Net Neutrality FCC Vote Today December 14, 2017

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by hmscott, Dec 14, 2017.

  1. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Last edited: May 16, 2018 at 9:57 PM
  2. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Prophet

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    The entertainment sector? Like Hollywood? Gives more to Republicans?

    BAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

    Oh wait, you’re serious? Then let me laugh some more.

    AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

    You net neutrality cultists are an absolute riot.


    http://time.com/4084807/hollywood-political-donors-hillary-clinton/

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  3. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Senate Approves Overturning FCC's Net Neutrality Repeal
    May 16, 201811:48 AM ET
    Heard on All Things Considered
    By BILL CHAPPELL, SUSAN DAVIS
    https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo...proves-overturning-fccs-net-neutrality-repeal
    [​IMG]
    "Senate Democrats say they have the votes to formally disapprove of the FCC's Internet policy that will take effect next month. Here, supporters of net neutrality protest the decision to repeal the Obama-era rule. Kyle Grillot/Reuters

    Updated at 4:22 p.m. ET
    The Senate approved a resolution Wednesday to nullify the Federal Communications Commission's net neutrality rollback, dealing a symbolic blow to the FCC's new rule that remains on track to take effect next month.

    The final vote was 52-47. As expected, Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, joined Democrats in voting to overturn the FCC's controversial decision. But two other Republicans — Sen. John Kennedy of Louisiana and Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska — also voted in favor of the resolution of disapproval.

    The outcome is unlikely to derail the FCC's repeal of Obama-era rules that restrict Internet service providers' ability to slow down or speed up users' access to specific websites and apps.

    The legislative victory is fleeting because the House does not intend to take similar action, but Democrats are planning to carry the political fight over Internet access into the 2018 midterms.

    "Today is a monumental day," said Sen. Edward Markey, D-Mass., during debate over the resolution. "Today we show the American people who sides with them, and who sides with the powerful special interests and corporate donors who are thriving under this administration."

    Critics of the FCC rollback say they're worried about consumers being forced to pay more for less consistent or slower service. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, part of the Republican majority, has said the Obama rule was "heavy-handed" and isn't needed.

    Markey described a coalition of Internet voters who bridge the usual philosophical party lines when it comes to government regulation. "The grandparents, the gamers, the gearheads, the geeks, the GIF-makers, the Generations X, Y, and Z. This movement to save net neutrality is made up of every walk of American life," he said.

    Republicans overwhelmingly support ending net neutrality because they want to shift regulatory power away from the federal government and toward the private market. Republicans also argue that Democrats are playing on unfounded fears that Internet service providers will jack up costs and anger their consumer base. "If the Democrats want to run on regulating the Internet, I think that's a losing strategy," said Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., who runs the Senate GOP's 2018 campaign operation and voted against the resolution.

    This issue doesn't cut along clean party lines, said Steven Kull, who runs the Program for Public Consultation at the University of Maryland and has studied public attitudes on net neutrality. The program's research has found that majorities of Americans support government-mandated net neutrality protections.

    "People are on the Internet a lot and it's a big part of their daily experience and the prospect that it will be changed in some fundamental way is disturbing to quite a lot of them," Kull said.

    Fear is a great motivator for voters. Senate Democrats believe their resolution that put every Democrat on record in support of net neutrality — and most Republicans on record against it — can turn what was once considered a wonk issue into a wedge issue this November. "People underestimate the passion of Internet voters, at their peril. They are mad, and they want to know what they can do, and this vote will make things crystal clear," he said.

    Republicans like Rep. Scott Taylor of Virginia think Democrats are wrong on the policy of net neutrality and that eliminating FCC rules will expand competition and consumer choice. However, he concedes that Democrats have done a better job of selling their message to voters and says there could be consequences if Republicans don't engage more directly with voters on an issue they care about.

    "It's important Republicans have a clear and concise message to tell them why net neutrality, while it sounds good, and maybe it's even well-intended, is not the right answer for them," Taylor said.

    Net neutrality doesn't make for catchy campaign slogans, but there are indicators that voters are clocking this issue. According to data provided by Google, net neutrality regularly ranks among top political searches in each state.

    In Pennsylvania and Nebraska, which held their primary elections on Tuesday, it ranked second in political searches behind health care. "This is one of those areas where Washington, D.C., sometimes gets in a bubble and doesn't recognize what's going on in the rest of the country," said Sen. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., who runs the Senate Democrats' 2018 campaign operation.

    Kull is more skeptical that net neutrality will be a potent voter motivator this year unless people start to see changes to their Internet costs, speed or access. Voters may know soon enough: The Obama-era net neutrality rules expire June 11."
     
  4. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Senate Votes to Restore Net Neutrality - IGN News
    IGN News
    Published on May 16, 2018
    The Senate has voted to restore the FCC's Net Neutrality rules, but the movement still needs to pass the House and get the President's signature. 24 States are working toward their own Net Neutrality protections for Internet consumers.
     
  5. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    How states can protect net neutrality if Congress won't
    CBS News
    Published on May 16, 2018
    The Senate voted Wednesday to repeal the Federal Communications Commission's dismantling of net neutrality regulations. PC Magazine software analyst Max Eddy spoke to CBSN about why he thinks this bill won't pass the House, and what individual states can do to protect net neutrality for their own residents.
     
  6. Fishon

    Fishon I Will Close You

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    Haha. Are you serious that you only read half of a sentence? Like Hollywood? No. Like the three companies I stated within the same sentence, which I should have said are in the ISP sector.

    I don't believe anyone is naive enough to believe NN is solely a us vs. the evil corps. fight. There are many large companies on both sides which stand to gain or lose on this issue. But what are you implying when you say 'you NN cultists are an absolute riot'? Are you in favor of the ISP's since they own it and can do whatever they please- a free market, don't regulate position? Please expound on your comment.
     
  7. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    ISPs and Ajit Pai are really sad about Senate’s vote for net neutrality
    After Senate vote to maintain net neutrality, broadband lobby steps up opposition.

    JON BRODKIN - 5/17/2018, 9:55 AM
    https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy...ly-sad-about-senates-vote-for-net-neutrality/
    [​IMG]
    MAY 16, 2018: Senate Minority Leader Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.), and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) at a press conference after a Senate vote to maintain net neutrality rules.

    "Broadband lobby groups and FCC Chairman Ajit Pai are upset about yesterday's US Senate vote to restore net neutrality rules and are calling on Republican lawmakers to kill the effort in the House.

    Yesterday's Senate vote "throws into reverse our shared goal of maintaining an open, thriving Internet," said USTelecom, which represents AT&T, Verizon, CenturyLink, and other telcos.

    USTelecom claimed to speak on behalf of Internet users, saying that "Consumers want permanent, comprehensive online protections, not half measures or election year posturing from our representatives in Congress."

    Cable lobby group NCTA also condemned the Senate vote—while trying to convince the public that its members support net neutrality. Both USTelecom and NCTA were part of a failed lawsuit that sought to kill net neutrality rules, but they got their wish when the Federal Communications Commissionvoted to repeal them in December 2017.

    Pai predicts failure in House
    The Senate yesterday voted 52-47 to reverse the FCC repeal of net neutrality rules. If the House and President Trump also approve the measure, ISPs would have to continue following rules that prohibit blocking, throttling, and paid prioritization. Pai's net neutrality repeal is slated to take effect on June 11, unless Congress stops it.

    Pai defended his net neutrality repeal, saying that having no net neutrality rules at all "will help promote digital opportunity" and "mak[e] high-speed Internet access available to every single American." Pai said he is "confident that [Democrats'] effort to reinstate heavy-handed government regulation of the Internet will fail" in the House.

    Pai's statement did not explain how eliminating rules against blocking or throttling Internet content would help expand Internet access. Pai has previously claimed that the net neutrality repeal is already spurring new broadband investment, but his evidence consisted mostly of deployments that were planned during the Obama administration or funded directly by the FCC before Pai was the chair.

    The Senate vote also drew condemnation from wireless lobby group CTIA, Charter Communications, and AT&T, among others.

    CTIA said that the FCC's repeal of net neutrality rules hasn't prevented Americans from accessing online content—but CTIA failed to note that the rules are still in effect. "[T]he predictions of naysayers failed to materialize" after the December repeal vote, CTIA wrote. "[O]ur wireless experience remains open and fast, and we can access the content of our choosing when and how we want."

    Charter argued that the net neutrality rules and common carrier regulation of broadband "treat the Internet like a government controlled utility, restrict innovation and deter broadband deployment to less populated communities."

    Democrats will try to force House vote
    While Democratic lawmakers pushed the net neutrality bill through the Senate, Republicans have a 236-193 majority in the House and may be able to kill the effort to preserve net neutrality. Democrats need a majority of representatives to sign a discharge petition in order to force a House vote.

    "With the majority leadership in the House opposed to this bill, the only way to bring it before the full House for a vote is through a discharge petition," Rep. Mike Doyle (D-Penn.), who is filing the petition, said yesterday. "I'm sure that every member of the House will want to know where their constituents stand on this issue."

    In the Senate, three Republican senators broke ranks in order to vote for net neutrality rules. House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) supported the FCC's net neutrality repeal and could try to prevent the Democrats' resolution from coming to a vote.

    "I encourage my colleagues in the House to listen to the American people, force a vote on... Doyle's resolution, and send it to the president's desk," Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr. (D-N.J.) said.

    Disclosure: The Advance/Newhouse Partnership, which owns 13 percent of Charter, is part of Advance Publications. Advance Publications owns Condé Nast, which owns Ars Technica."
     
  8. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    House Democrats are collecting signatures to force a vote on net neutrality
    By Russell Brandom @russellbrandom May 18, 2018, 4:22pm EDT
    https://www.theverge.com/2018/5/18/17352480/house-democrats-net-neutrality-vote

    "A coalition of House Democrats has begun proceedings to force a vote to restore net neutrality protections. The discharge petition, introduced by Rep. Mike Doyle (D-PA), allows the House to force a vote if half the representatives sign on, giving activists until the end of the session in January to collect the necessary signatures. They currently have 90, all from Democrats.

    The resolution would roll back FCC chairman Ajit Pai’s recent internet order under the Congressional Review Act, effectively restoring the 2015 rules against paid prioritization and throttling. The resolution passed the Senate earlier this week but faces steep odds in the House: to win the necessary votes, more than 20 Republican representatives will have to break with their party and support the repeal. Even if the resolution does make it through Congress, it will require President Trump’s signature to take effect, which is a difficult hurdle given his historical opposition to the 2015 rules.

    Still, activists believe net neutrality’s broad popularity could force House Republicans and even the president to change sides on the issue. Even if they don’t, many see the vote as a chance to force members of Congress to take sides ahead of a heated midterm.

    “There is nowhere to hide, and there are no excuses,” said Sen. Brian Schatz (D-HI) after the Senate vote. “You are either for a free and open internet or you are not.”"
     
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