Net Neutrality FCC Vote Today December 14, 2017

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  1. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Why the first state with a net neutrality law isn’t scared of lawsuits
    Washington lawmaker: FCC can’t preempt state laws “just because it says so."
    JON BRODKIN - 3/16/2018, 7:45 AM
    https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy...-lawmaker-tells-isps-were-ready-for-lawsuits/

    "Washington, the first US state to pass a net neutrality law after the repeal of federal rules, might have to get ready for a court battle.

    Washington's legislature and governor defied the Federal Communications Commission's claim that states cannot implement their own net neutrality rules, and they are likely to face a lawsuit from Internet service providers or their lobby groups. But the legislation's primary sponsor, State Rep. Drew Hansen (D-Bainbridge Island), is confident that the state will win in court.

    Hansen is also a trial lawyer and has litigated preemption questions, he told Ars in an interview this week.

    "The FCC doesn't have preemption authority just because it says so," Hansen said.

    FCC abandoned authority over broadband
    Hansen's net neutrality bill was opposed by wireless industry lobby group CTIA, which represents AT&T, Verizon Wireless, T-Mobile, Sprint, and other mobile carriers. The bill was also opposed by the Broadband Communications Association of Washington, which represents Comcast, Charter, Wave Broadband, and others.

    FURTHER READING

    Why states might win the net neutrality war against the FCCThe state law will prohibit home and mobile Internet providers from blocking or throttling lawful Internet traffic and from charging online services for prioritization. The state law is slated to take effect after the FCC finalizes its repeal of net neutrality rules.

    An ISP or trade group could sue the state in an attempt to nullify the state law.

    "I think practically it would be one of the telecommunications companies or trade associations that would file a lawsuit and raise preemption challenges," Hansen said.

    Litigants would point to the parts of the FCC's net neutrality repeal order that purport to preempt state net neutrality laws. But that isn't necessarily a slam dunk.

    FURTHER READING

    Defying Pai’s FCC, Washington state passes law protecting net neutrality

    As we noted in a previous article, the FCC said in the repeal order that it lacks authority to regulate Internet providers as common carriers. There's good reason to think the FCC is wrong about this, since a federal appeals court found in 2016 that the FCC does have that authority, though it doesn't have to use it if it prefers not to.

    But that's not the crucial point when it comes to preemption of state laws. What's important is that the FCC's Republican leadership abandoned its authority to strictly regulate broadband, while simultaneously claiming that it has the authority to prevent states from strictly regulating broadband. That's where the FCC argument fails, Hansen said.

    "Here is the oddity of the position that they're taking in the net neutrality repeal," Hansen said. "They're saying the Communications Act lacks any authority that would give them the ability to impose broad standards of conduct on the Internet but grants them broad sweeping authority to preempt state consumer protection laws related to the same area. It's not clear to me how this can be the case."

    Legal hurdle
    One possible problem for Washington is the "dormant commerce clause."

    This legal principle concerns "whether states can constitutionally reach beyond their borders for economic regulation when Congress is silent in its lawmaking role," Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) Legislative Counsel Ernesto Falcon told Ars recently:

    "When Congress has nothing really written in law, then it's a dormant commerce clause question where states are restricted in two ways," Falcon said. "1) They can't discriminate against out-of-state economic actors in favor of in-state actors and 2) They can't unduly burden interstate commercial activity and must have a strong state interest."

    Falcon thinks the dormant commerce clause will make state net neutrality laws vulnerable to legal attack unless states use indirect regulatory approaches, such as requiring recipients of state broadband subsidies or state contracts to abide by net neutrality.

    Hansen disagrees.

    "The test is whether something substantially impairs interstate commerce," he said. "The states all the time write consumer protection laws related to the Internet without dormant commerce clause problems. Just because the Internet is nationwide does not equate to 'the states cannot regulate conduct on the Internet.'"

    It's clear that ISPs know how to distinguish between Internet users in one state and users from another and would be able to impose different net neutrality regimes in each state if they chose to do so, he said.

    “The industry was opposed and the public was in favor.”

    Although the FCC argued that the interstate nature of the Internet should preclude state net neutrality rules, the repeal order never mentioned the dormant commerce clause.

    One state requiring net neutrality wouldn't conflict with other state laws, Hansen also argued. There aren't any state laws that require ISPs to block or throttle lawful Internet traffic, so the Washington net neutrality law isn't prohibiting anything that other states require, he said.

    “We do still live in a democracy”
    Washington's legislature held several hearings on the net neutrality legislation before voting it through. "The industry was opposed and the public was in favor," Hansen said. "And you know, we do still live in a democracy, so that still matters."

    ISPs and broadband lobby groups have complained that they don't want a "patchwork" of 50 state laws. But ISPs abide by different consumer protection laws in different states already, Hansen noted.

    "If ISPs are so concerned about a patchwork of state laws that possibly conflict, perhaps they should not have lobbied for the FCC to eliminate national laws," he said.

    Hansen's net neutrality bill was approved in the state House by a vote of 93-5 and in the Senate by a vote of 35-14. Both the state House and Senate are split nearly down the middle, with Democrats holding a slim advantage. Democrats have a 50-48 advantage over Republicans in the House and a 25-24 advantage in the Senate.

    "In Washington, we do have a long tradition of working across party lines for common-sense consumer protections whether on the Internet or elsewhere," Hansen said.

    Hansen worked with Republican state Rep. Norma Smith on the net neutrality legislation, he said. The bipartisan duo also worked together on a broadband privacy bill that would have replaced the US-wide privacy protections repealed by the federal government last year. That bill wasn't passed, but Hansen said he hopes to get it through in the next legislative session."
     
  2. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    These Maps Show All the Cities and States Now Defending Net Neutrality
    Spoiler alert: It's most of them.
    [​IMG]
    By Kevin Litman-Navarro on March 16, 2018
    Filed Under Fight for the Future, Internet Culture, Maps & Politics
    https://www.inverse.com/article/42443-net-neutrality-maps

    "In the three months since the FCC decided to repeal existing net neutrality protections, a sizable political coalition has worked to reinstate net neutrality through a variety of legal procedures. Both at the state and municipal level, open internet advocates and politicians have launched into action, ranging from lawsuits to executive orders to legislation in order to save the internet as we know it.

    Check out the maps below to see if — and how — your region is fighting for net neutrality.

    Net Neutrality Sparks a National Movement
    [​IMG]
    The map above shows the general scope of net neutrality activism nationwide. Every red state is engaged in some effort to protect net neutrality at either the state or the municipal level. As of March 16, there are only 16 states with no relevant action at the state level or in any city.

    Statewide Net Neutrality Protections
    [​IMG]
    As seen in the map above, 28 different states have proposed legislation to adopt net neutrality regulations.

    Only one state — Washington — has already passed a law in the state legislature protecting net neutrality statewide. Its legislation basically reinstates the Obama-era regulations repealed by the FCC, meaning that ISPs won’t be able to block content or establish fast and slow internet lanes once it goes into effect in June. Some believe that Washington’s legislation might provoke a lawsuit from the FCC, because the December repeal of net neutrality stipulated that city and state governments were prohibited from drafting their own rules. Because the FCC’s new plan isn’t set to go into effect until April 23, we might have to wait to see if the FCC pursues action against Washington.

    The other states that are considering varying degrees of net neutrality legislation are:
    • Alaska
    • California
    • Connecticut
    • Delaware
    • Georgia
    • Idaho
    • Illinois
    • Iowa
    • Kansas
    • Kentucky
    • Maryland
    • Michigan
    • Missouri
    • Nebraska
    • New Jersey
    • New Mexico
    • New York
    • Oregon (legislation is awaiting gubernatorial approval.)
    • Pennsylvania
    • Rhode Island
    • South Carolina
    • South Dakota
    • Tennessee
    • Virginia
    • Vermont
    • Wisconsin
    • West Virginia
    Executive Orders to Encourage Net Neutrality[​IMG]
    Governors in six states have issued executive orders to ensure that only ISPs that uphold net neutrality will receive government contract work. This action is not subject to any potential FCC lawsuit because it isn’t technically legislation. The states with executive orders intended to protect net neutrality are:
    • Delaware
    • Hawaii
    • Montana
    • New Jersey
    • New York
    • Vermont
    Let’s Just Sue the FCC and Be Legends[​IMG]
    State attorneys in the District of Columbia and 21 states have filed lawsuits against the FCC claiming that the new regulation violates the Constitution, among other things. A petition to the Washington D.C. Court of appeals highlights their concerns.

    State petitioners seek a determination by this Court that the [FCC] Order is arbitrary, capricious, and an abuse of discretion within the meaning of the Administrative Procedure Act; violates federal law, including, but not limited to, the Constitution, the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, and FCC regulations promulgated thereunder; conflicts with the notice-and‐comment rulemaking requirements of 5 U.S.C. § 553; and is otherwise contrary to law.

    In fact, every state with a Democratic Attorney General filed a lawsuit. These states include:
    • California
    • Connecticut
    • Delaware
    • Hawaii
    • Illinois
    • Iowa
    • Kentucky
    • Maine
    • Maryland
    • Massachussets
    • Minnesota
    • Mississippi
    • New Mexico
    • New York
    • North Carolina
    • Oregon
    • Pennsylvania
    • Rhode Island
    • Vermont
    • Virginia
    • Washington
    • Washington D.C.
    Mayors for Net Neutrality[​IMG]
    New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio recently announced the formation of Mayors For Net Neutrality. This new coalition is comprised of mayors committed to fighting for net neutrality by withholding municipal contracts from any ISPs that don’t conform to the old net neutrality regulations. Members so far include:
    • County Board of Supervisors Chair Zach Friend – Santa Cruz County, California
    • Mayor Steve Adler — Austin, Texas
    • Mayor Bill de Blasio — New York, New York
    • Mayor Don Boeder — Gaylord, Minnesota
    • Mayor Pauline Cutter — San Leandro, California
    • Mayor Mark Farrell — San Francisco, California
    • Mayor Tom Feldkamp — Bow Mar, Colorado
    • Mayor Jacob Frey — Minneapolis, Minnesota
    • Mayor Sly James — Kansas City, Missouri
    • Mayor Sam Liccardo — San Jose, California
    • Mayor Ron Nirenberg — San Antonio, Texas
    • Mayor Steve Schewel — Durham, North Carolina
    • Mayor Barney Seney — Putnam, Connecticut
    • Mayor Paul Soglin — Madison, Wisconsin
    • Mayor Ethan Strimling — Portland, Maine
    • Mayor Catherine E. Pugh — Baltimore, Maryland
    • Mayor Lucy Vinis — Eugene, Oregon
    • Mayor Ted Wheeler — Portland, Oregon
    What’s Next
    The net neutrality repeal is set to go into effect on April 23 in the absence of congressional action. Senate Democrats have mounted a campaign to strike down the FCC’s ruling through a Congressional Review Action (CRA), but the effort has stalled. Assuming that no CRA is passed, it will be up to state and local governments to adopt their own net neutrality regulations, and deal with any action that might come back at them from the Trump administration or the FCC.

    This story will be updated regularly. Last updated on March 16."
     
  3. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    ACLU urges cities to build public broadband to protect net neutrality
    BY HARPER NEIDIG - 03/29/18 10:00 AM EDT
    http://thehill.com/policy/technolog...uild-public-broadband-networks-to-protect-net

    "The ACLU is calling on cities across the country to build their own public municipal broadband networks to help preserve net neutrality after the Federal Communications Commission repealed the open internet rules.

    In a report released Thursday morning, the civil liberties group argued that in the absence of the FCC’s rules cities could give residents an alternative to private service providers who will soon no longer be required to treat all web traffic equally.

    “Internet service has become as essential as utilities like water and electricity, and local governments should treat it that way,” Jay Stanley, an ACLU policy analyst who authored the report, said in a statement.

    “If local leaders want to protect their constituents’ rights and expand quality internet access, then community broadband is an excellent way to do that,” Stanley added.

    The ACLU sent the report to more than 100 mayors across the country who had spoken out against the FCC’s decision to scrap the rules.

    The Republican-led FCC voted in December to repeal the Obama-era consumer protections that prohibited internet providers from blocking or throttling websites, or creating paid internet fast lanes. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai argued that the regulations were too onerous and that existing antitrust and consumer protection laws are enough to keep service providers in check.

    But the ACLU and other groups say that repealing the rules threatens online speech and the free flow of information online.

    Democratic governors and legislatures across the country have responded to the repeal by implementing their own state net neutrality protections. Supporters have applauded those moves but warn that they are susceptible to legal challenges given that the FCC preempted the states from filling the void with their own rules.

    The ACLU’s new report calls for cities to build internet networks that abide by net neutrality principles in order to ensure that users have an alternative if internet providers start abusing their powers over access.

    Such proposals are gaining traction in major cities like San Francisco, and have already seen some success in places like Chattanooga, Tenn. But the telecom industry has fought back against municipal broadband projects; twenty-two states have prohibited localities from building public networks, according to the report.

    Still, the ACLU argues that municipal networks are one of the few courses remaining for local leaders who believe in net neutrality.

    “If the commercial providers are determined to make money by violating the privacy and speech rights of their users, and if some policymakers in Washington are determined to clear the way for them to do that — then states, cities, towns, and counties should take matters into their own hands by creating publicly owned services that do honor those values and can help ensure an open internet,” the report reads."
     
  4. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    No, net neutrality is not “officially dead,” today.
    The FCC repeal has not yet gone into effect. The senate will vote soon on whether to block the repeal. Now’s the time to pay attention!
    https://medium.com/@fightfortheftr/no-net-neutrality-is-not-officially-dead-today-b6f133075c13

    "There have been a lot of inaccurate reports that the FCC’s repeal of net neutrality will officially go into effect today, April 23rd. That’s not true. It’s a bit more complicated than that.

    It’s understandable many journalists are confused by this. It’s legitimately confusing. The FCC order said it would go into effect 60 days after publication in the Federal Register, which would have been April 23rd. But, it still has to be approved by the Office of Management & Budget

    There was another FCC filing in the Federal Register that would imply the earliest the Office of Management & Budget could approve this (and it’s worth noting that approval is basically just a technicality) is actually April 27th, but its likely to happen some time after that, possibly even weeks after.

    The most important thing for EVERYONE to understand is that nothing catastrophic or dramatic is going to happen immediately when the FCC rules go into effect. Telecom shills will immediately start saying “See? The sky didn’t fall, we never needed Net Neutrality.” They’re lying.

    The ISPs aren’t going to immediately start blocking content or rolling out paid prioritization scams. They know Congress and the public are watching them. Rather, the death of net neutrality will be slow and insidious. You might not even notice it at first.

    And that’s the worst part. What will happen is over time ISP scams and abuses will become more commonplace and more accepted. They’ll roll out new schemes that appear good on their face but undermine the free market of ideas by allowing ISPs to pick winners and losers.

    Over time we’ll see less awesome startups. Less awesome videos. Less diverse online content. And we’ll see more content that our ISPs want us to see. The Internet will be watered down and manipulated. It will change forever in ways that harm our democracy. But it will take time.

    So don’t fall for ISP lobbyists talking points. They’re ALREADY claiming that net neutrality was never needed since the sky hasn’t fallen, and the rules haven’t even gone into effect. But also don’t panic. The Internet is not going to die next week. Keep calm and keep fighting. The Senate will vote in a matter of weeks on a Congressional Review Act (CRA) resolution to block the FCC’s repeal. Now is the moment to get engaged."
     
  5. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    California net neutrality bill that AT&T hates is coming to New York, too
    Bill is moving through Calif. Senate and will be submitted in NY legislature.
    JON BRODKIN - 5/1/2018, 1:54 PM
    https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy...ill-that-att-hates-is-coming-to-new-york-too/
    [​IMG]
    "A California bill that would impose the nation's strictest state net neutrality law is being replicated in the New York state legislature.

    In California, the bill was approved last month by two Senate committees despite protest from AT&T and cable lobbyists, and it needs to go through one more committee before getting a vote of the full state Senate. Today, a lawmaker in New York said he has teamed up with the California bill's author to introduce an equivalent bill in the New York legislature.

    The "bicoastal effort to restore the rights of an open and free Internet through net neutrality legislation" would cover nearly one-fifth of the American population if both states enact the proposed law, the California and New York state senators said in their announcement.

    The California and New York bills would replicate the US-wide bans on blocking, throttling, and paid prioritization that were implemented by the FCC in 2015, and they would go beyond the FCC rules with a ban on paid data-cap exemptions.

    The California bill was sponsored by Sen. Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco). In New York, State Senator Brad Hoylman (D-Manhattan) said that he is introducing a bill today that includes all the key consumer protections from Wiener's proposal.

    The FCC voted to repeal its rules in December and declared that states are preempted from passing their own net neutrality rules. ISPs are almost certain to sue states to block any such laws, but local lawmakers believe they have a good shot at succeeding in court.

    Washington and Oregon have already passed state net neutrality laws, but the California bill goes further than either of those laws. For analysis on possible litigation, see our previous article, "Why States Might Win the Net Neutrality War Against the FCC."

    Getting more states on board
    Wiener and Hoylman will try to convince lawmakers in more states to pass legislation similar to theirs, their announcement said. If successful, the strategy could address the broadband industry's complaint that ISPs shouldn't have to face a "patchwork" of different state laws.

    Net neutrality is essential for "the free exchange of ideas," Hoylman said. "When the federal government fails to guarantee these basic rights, it is necessary for states to intervene and provide a platform for free expression."

    New York Governor Andrew Cuomo previously signed an executive order to enforce net neutrality, though it only applies to ISPs that offer service to state government agencies. New York, California, and 20 other states are also suing the FCC to overturn the net neutrality repeal order.

    Meanwhile, Democrats in Congress are trying to restore the net neutrality rules nationwide. Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.) said yesterday that, on May 9, the Democrats will "file the petition to force a vote on the Senate floor to save net neutrality.""
     
  6. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    'Painful' To See Net Neutrality Rules Dismantled, Outgoing FCC Commissioner Says
    By EDITOR, Originally published on May 2, 2018 3:08 pm
    [​IMG]
    In this Feb. 26, 2015, FCC Commissioner Mignon Clyburn, takes her seat before the start of an FCC open hearing and vote on Net Neutrality in Washington, D.C. (Pablo Martinez Monsivais, file/AP)

    "The Federal Communications Commission is losing one of its two Democrats in the coming weeks. Mignon Clyburn (@MClyburnFCC) was appointed by President Obama in 2009, and she has been on the losing side of a number of battles in recent months at the Republican-controlled agency, including the FCC’s dismantling of net neutrality rules that Clyburn helped to craft.

    “It’s disturbing,” she tells Here & Now‘s Mina Kim. “It took us years, and we used this inclusive, painstaking process in order to achieve the balance that looked out and took into account consumers’ needs. And to see all of that being put at risk, it’s painful. It was unnecessary.”

    Interview Highlights
    On her decision to leave the FCC

    “Why now? Because I think the time is right for me. I’ve spent nearly nine years at the FCC. I’ve seen a lot of great policy decisions. I’ve been a part of enabling broadband connectivity all over this country, bringing awareness to those who are on the wrong side of the opportunities and technology and economic divide. And how a connected America … what that could mean for them. I have done all that I know how to do to bring a voice, to bring awareness to consumers’ needs. And so I concluded that my effectiveness would be more so realized on the outside as opposed to staying at the commission.”

    On Senate Democrats preparing to force a procedural vote on restoring net neutrality rules

    “They’re listening to the citizens back home. More than 80 percent of them are in support of strong net neutrality principles. They’re looking at those two states and more than 30 other states that are considering their own legislation. Six states have put executive orders in place. They say, ‘If you do business in our state, you will abide by those net neutrality principles.’ They’re listening to the will of the people because the federal government has punted. The federal government that, when my parents were coming up, it was a positive backstop when it came to insuring those opportunities and those freedoms. And state and local governments are the only backstops that people have now.”

    On FCC chairman Ajit Pai’s comments that loosening restrictions will spur broadband in low-income and rural areas

    “If he were to go to those communities and ask those individuals who their provider is, he would have heard that in at least half of those communities, there’s only one option. And in some communities, there are no real options. And again, if you really tell and dissect and tell people exactly what the future holds for them — that monopoly will be the gatekeeper, potentially, when it comes to their access over the internet. If he were to be transparent about what the future holds for them, I guarantee you he would not have gotten a great reception.”

    On phone rates for people in prisons

    “They have seen their rates — particularly when it comes to intrastate rates, those rates that people are charged inside of this state — they’ve seen them go up. We made some initial strides, positive strides, with interstates, meaning calls between states. But what happened when we made that commitment to rationalize those rates in between states, what those companies did was shift the costs to that more unregulated infrastructure when it comes to intrastate rates. So what we’re seeing is people are actually paying more to call loved ones inside of the states. And the FCC is silent, is sitting on its hands, and there is no agency that is stepping up to the plate.”

    On who will pick up where she left off at the FCC

    “I am hoping my successor will. There are millions that don’t have broadband at home. There are millions who don’t have a dial tone. I am hopeful that that individual will hear those voices and will be an advocate for change.

    “What was going to happen by the end of the year … I was going to have to leave. So, my time of service was up. But, look, I’m not going far. So while I won’t have a vote, I will still have a voice. And you will hear it.”

    Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/ "
     
  7. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Democrats launch net neutrality fight to energize midterm voters
    By JOHN HENDEL , 04/30/2018 12:55 PM EDT
    https://www.politico.com/story/2018/04/30/democrats-net-neutrality-midterm-voters-508425

    "Senate Democrats are preparing to force a floor vote next month on restoring net neutrality rules repealed by President Donald Trump's Federal Communications Commission, creating a public clash they hope will help them in the midterm elections.

    Democrats are planning to take the procedural step May 9 to compel the vote, a Senate Democratic aide told POLITICO. That could set up the vote as soon as the following week.

    Senate Democrats have 50 votes lined up — more than enough to force a vote under the Congressional Review Act, but one shy of the 51 required for passage. Sen. Susan Collins of Maine is the only Republican to have pledged support for the effort so far.

    Even with Senate passage, the Democrats’ proposal would be unlikely to get through the House or earn Trump’s signature. But their plans for a floor fight would still add visibility to an issue that Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer has suggested will resonate with younger, internet-savvy voters.

    “We’re in the homestretch in the fight to save net neutrality,” Schumer said in a statement. “Soon, the American people will know which side their member of Congress is on: fighting for big corporations and ISPs or defending small business owners, entrepreneurs, middle-class families and every-day consumers.”

    The congressional resolution is the latest showdown in a decade-long fight over net neutrality, the concept that internet service providers like Comcast and Verizon should treat all internet traffic equally as it passes through their networks. The FCC has repeatedly tried to enact net neutrality rules, only to be thwarted in court or by changes of leadership at the commission.

    FCC Republicans led by Chairman Ajit Pai repealed the latest, Obama-era net neutrality order in December, arguing the rules are burdensome and unnecessary to preserving an open internet. Democrats have 60 legislative days to force a vote to reverse the decision following publication of the FCC’s repeal in the Federal Register on Feb. 22.

    Democrats and pro-net neutrality groups have been searching for the elusive 51st vote for weeks, putting a special focus on Sen. John Kennedy (R-La.), who has said he’s undecided on the issue.

    “We’re only one vote away from securing a victory in the Senate,” Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.), who introduced the resolution to undo the FCC repeal, told reporters Thursday. “Momentum continues to build in every corner of the country.”

    Democrats are planning another net neutrality "day of action” to rally support on May 9, the Senate aide said."
     
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    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    AT&T paid $200,000 to Trump’s attorney, Michael Cohen, and the payments stop right after Trump’s FCC pick Ajit Pai repealed net neutrality
    https://medium.com/@fightfortheftr/...ayments-stop-right-after-trump-s-3356687f4827

    "TL;DR: AT&T is sketchy as hell and you should join the Red Alert for Net Neutrality starting tomorrow and contact your lawmakers!

    So, its entirely possible that there is a “very reasonable” explanation for this (in that way where giant corporations can have reasonable explanations for why they pay hundreds of thousands of dollars to sitting president’s personal attorneys), but…

    Stormy Daniels’ attorney, Michael Avenatti, alleges that AT&T paid $200,000 to Trump’s attorney, Michael Cohen through the same shell company he used to pay Stormy Daniels. The money came in four installments of $50,000, starting in early 2017 and ending in January 2018, right after Trump’s pick for FCC chair, Ajit Pai, rushed through the repeal of net neutrality, despite overwhelming outcry from across the political spectrum.

    AT&T confirms the payment, and explains it away saying they paid Cohen as a consultant to “gain insight” into the Trump White House.

    Not conclusive, but certainly fishy and worth looking into. In the meantime, the Senate is about to vote on a resolution to block the FCC repeal and restore net neutrality, so contact your lawmakers now, and join the Red Alert protests starting tomorrow."

    https://www.reddit.com/r/KeepOurNetFree/
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2018
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    The Fight to Save Net Neutrality is Not Over
    Senator Bernie Sanders
    Published on May 11, 2018
    The end of net neutrality would be a disaster for our country and the free flow of ideas. But this fight is not over. Here's what's at stake and how we can save net neutrality.
     
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    NET NEUTRALITY *RED ALERT*
    The Young Turks
    Published on May 10, 2018
    Cenk Uygur, the host of The Young Turks, interviews Senator Ed Markey on an upcoming vote on net neutrality.
    To save the internet go to:https://www.battleforthenet.com/redal...


    [​IMG]
    It's 2018. If they don't vote for net neutrality this spring, we can vote them out in November.
    The FCC just ignored the public and killed net neutrality. But in 2018, Congress will have a simple up or down vote on whether to overturn the FCC or betray 83% of American voters, in a close election year. If they don't vote for net neutrality, we won't vote for them. They'll listen, or lose.
    https://votefornetneutrality.com/

    Other Youtube coverage:
    Red Alert for Net Neutrality

    Red Alert for Net Neutrality!

    The FCC voted to kill net neutrality and let ISPs like Comcast and Verizon ruin the Internet with throttling, censorship, and new fees. But the Senate is about to vote on a resolution to overrule them and save the Internet using the Congressional Review Act (CRA). We only need one more vote to win. Write your lawmakers now!
    https://www.battleforthenet.com/
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2018
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