Net Neutrality FCC Vote Today December 14, 2017

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by hmscott, Dec 14, 2017.

  1. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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  2. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Awesome story, gotta read it - spoiler - it looks like a happy ending - NY is fed up with Charter's BS and is kicking them out of the state. :)

    Spectrum internet is getting kicked out of New York
    See ya
    By Ashley Carman@ashleyrcarman Jul 27, 2018, 3:01pm EDT
    https://www.theverge.com/2018/7/27/17622846/spectrum-charter-cable-internet-new-york-kicked-out

    "New York is officially kicking internet and cable provider Spectrum, aka Charter,out of the state after the company failed to deliver on its fast internet promises. The state required Spectrum to roll out high-speed internet across underserved rural areas when it merged with Time Warner Cable in 2016."
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    More fun stuff to read about it on that link...

    Screw Net Neutrality, let's all let New York clean up the ISP's nationwide!! :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2018
  3. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Ajit Pai admits FCC lied about “DDoS,” blames it on Obama administration
    Former CIO "provided inaccurate information" about comment outage, Pai says.
    JON BRODKIN - 8/7/2018, 6:08 AM
    https://arstechnica.com/information...about-ddos-blames-it-on-obama-administration/

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  4. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Prophet

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    Please attempt to square this circle for me.

    Dj9WN_rU8AE5zIh.jpg Dj9WPg3UwAEsKep.jpg
     
  5. Fishon

    Fishon I Will Close You

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    As private companies, social networks are not required to adhere to the First Amendment. They set their own rules and retain the right to moderate content, routinely screening it for instances of gratuitous violence, harassment, profanity and other offensive material.

    Also (and we'll see what will happen in the lawsuit), his statements appear to have resulted in harm. By stating the parents and children were mere actors, and Sandyhook is all but a hoax, this has caused the parents to be harassed to the point of one having to move seven times.

    Free speech is his constitutional right. No one can stop him from speaking. But, apparently, he doesn't understand that free speech has consequences.
     
  6. Gabrielgvs

    Gabrielgvs Notebook Consultant

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    As a staunch supporter of the corrective power of free markets, I'm not really concerned over whatever Facebook decides to do, for example. I believe however, that the criticism they are receiving has a lot more to do with consistency than anything else. I'm go to guess (because I don't really know and don't Facebook) that there exists content similar in nature by organizations such as Antifa, who do not get censored. This is fine with me. However, what is problematic is lack of transparency. It's dishonest and misleading to market your platform (even implicitly) as a non-interested entity if that's just not the case (see:google). Market and brand your firm such that your political biases and agendas are clear and then let the market chips fall.
     
  7. Fishon

    Fishon I Will Close You

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    I could say in a general way, I feel Facebook and their workers are more liberal than conservative, therefore they must be leaning toward banning more on the right than left. But going a bit of research I'm not seeing it. I did a little Googling and couldn't really come up with anything at all comparable, and I can't find any conservative websites giving any examples of this. I firmly believe if there were some good examples out there, the right would be all over this pointing them out. https://www.politifact.com/punditfa...-host-only-conservatives-get-banned-facebook/ This guy makes the claim, and for what it's worth, the website refutes it. Here's an interesting article on why people feel there is a liberal bias to Facebook. https://civicscience.com/is-facebook-changing-the-political-landscape-forever/ Some have said they believe this banning has to do with the recent lawsuits filed against him by the parents, and if they win, the possibly of them being able to go after these social media companies. To be fair, he didn't call out for anyone to become violent, but there is clear defamation towards the parents and their children. Again, I can't find anything out there on the left that is comparable.

    While I stated these are private companies not beholden to the First Amendment, and agree with being a supporter of free markets to provide choices when the market dictates. However, these are monopolies, pure and simple. My boy gets his work schedule via Facebook, and public schools put out info via the service. It's really no longer a choice. Not saying it should be government regulated, but boy do they have a lot of power to censure, I agree.
     
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  8. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Prophet

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  9. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    FCC Chair to testify for lying about agency cyberattack
    Ajit Pai Testimony Starts at 14:00
    Lots of filler, then they sneak in the "cyberattack" question @ 56:45...
    Washington Post
    Streamed live 14 hours ago
    Ajit Pai claimed the Federal Communications Commission's servers went down due to a cyberattack during the FCC's repeal hearing of net neutrality.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2018
  10. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    ISPs say they can’t expand broadband unless gov’t gives them more money
    Industry asks for handouts, arguing that broadband is essential—like a utility.
    JON BRODKIN - 8/16/2018, 6:00 AM
    https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy...t-only-to-get-more-money-from-the-government/

    "Broadband providers have spent years lobbying against utility-style regulations that protect consumers from high prices and bad service.

    But now, broadband lobby groups are arguing that Internet service is similar to utilities such as electricity, gas distribution, roads, and water and sewer networks.

    In the providers' view, the essential nature of broadband doesn't require more regulation to protect consumers. Instead, they argue that broadband's utility-like status is reason for the government to give ISPs more money.

    That's the argument made by trade groups USTelecom and NTCA—The Rural Broadband Association. USTelecom represents telcos including AT&T, Verizon, and CenturyLink, while NTCA represents nearly 850 small ISPs.

    "Like electricity, broadband is essential to every American," USTelecom CEO Jonathan Spalter and NTCA CEO Shirley Bloomfield wrote Monday in an op-ed for The Topeka Capital-Journal.

    "Yet US broadband infrastructure has been financed largely by the private sector without assurance that such costs can be recovered through increased consumer rates."

    ISPs want benefits but not responsibilities
    While ISPs want the benefits of being treated like utilities—such as pole attachment rights and access to public rights-of-way—they oppose traditional utility-style obligations such as regulated prices and deployment to all Americans.

    The industry's main arguments against net neutrality and other common carrier regulations were that broadband shouldn't be treated as a utility and that the broadband market is too competitive to justify strict regulations.

    "Utility regulation over broadband can only inhibit incentives for network investment," AT&T warned in November 2017.
    ..."

    It gets worse (better?), check out the rest of the article...

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