NCASE M1 v5 Build

Discussion in 'Desktop Hardware' started by TBoneSan, Jul 16, 2017.

  1. TBoneSan

    TBoneSan Laptop Fiend

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    For those of you that might be interested.
    I recently did a build in the NCASE M1. It was an absolute heap of fun and I'm really happy with the results.The case is absolutely awesome - I take my hat off to the designers as the fit, finish and forethought is impressive.
    Yes I candied out with some RGB strips and made use of the motherboard RGB pins. I actually blocked off the light coming from the MB itself because it was overkill. I've tried to still keep things somewhat understated..

    Full Gallery here - http://imgur.com/gallery/AFjxJ
    Appologies for not embedding this, the Imgur code seems to not be working in this forum

    [​IMG]

    SPECS:

    SYSTEM
    Intel 7700k @ 5.0Ghz
    EVGA 1080ti FE
    ROG Strix Z270i Gaming
    G.Skill 16GB (2x8GB) 3600 @ 4000Mhz

    STORAGE
    1x Samsung 950 Pro 256 nvme
    2 x Sandisk x300 1tb
    1 x Crucial 1tb m.2 (inside 2.5" case)
    1 x Samsung 4tb 15mm 2.5" HDD

    OTHER
    Corsair H100i v2
    Corsair SF600 SFX
    2 x Noctua 120mm
    2 x Cougar Vortex PWM 120
    Phanteks RGB strip
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2017
  2. DukeCLR

    DukeCLR Notebook Deity

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    That is a sweet build, nice job.
     
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  3. kosti

    kosti Notebook Virtuoso

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    Very Nice indeed. Love that case.
     
  4. Robbo99999

    Robbo99999 Notebook Prophet

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    That's a cute build and packing some serious power! Amazing how small the case is with everything in there. I took a look at your pics in your gallery, does it get hot inside the case for the motherboard, because it looked like there was no space for air flow - looked like all space taken by the components and the leftover cabling, etc? I'm sure your CPU stays cool due to water cooling & the air being pulled through the radiator from outside the case, and it looks like your GPU can stay cool as you have intake fans pointed directly at the GPU, but what about motherboard temps, 'cause case airflow looks a little dodgy?

    The good thing about that small build, you can have it on the table looking good & not taking up too much room - I have to have mine under the desk, although from the outset I set out with the function over form premise.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2017
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  5. TBoneSan

    TBoneSan Laptop Fiend

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    Cheers bro. Yeah the cabling unfortunately is about as good as I can get it (visually). It's hard to see in the pictures which are rather unglamorous (and yes dodgy) from a aesthetic cabling perspective, but the fans have about 1-1.5" of unrestricted clearance except for the AIO tubing and that 1 Sata cable drooping down from over the top. I tried to prioritize this for turbulence and acoustics sake as well.

    It's good you recognized MB temps as a possibly a problematic area. Before I put this together I was concerned that the MB might not get enough cooling - partially why I put the fan on the inside in pull. Fortunately the temps are surprisingly good on the MB. I've not seen them venture above the 50s and are usually in the high 30s low 40s. I was also worried since there is no exhaust fan but I'm happy to report it doesn't need it.
    I'm also suprised that the 1080ti holds boost at 1847 with only 49% fan speed.
    I thought I'd be looking at getting a Artic Accelero Xtreme III but it seems unnecessary. I put metal on the GPU too so that might have had something to do with it.

    Let me know if you want me to run and stress/ temp tests for science sake :)
     
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  6. Robbo99999

    Robbo99999 Notebook Prophet

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    Your motherboard temperature is probably indicative of the air temperature within the case, but the good thing is that your CPU & GPU don't rely on air case temperature air for their intakes, so that's all good for them - and your motherboard temps are not dangerous, so that's good. My motherboard temperature is 34 degC as I type this, and the highest I've ever seen it during gaming is 45 degC, but the difference is I have loads of space in the case & it's more important for me because my GPU relies on that air inside the case for cooling (the CPU can suck in a good portion of air through the ventilation holes in the top of the case).

    I don't think you should change your GPU cooling away from the stock blower design, because you want to vent most of that heat out of the case. Oh right, you used liquid ultra metal paste for the GPU? It would have been interesting to have seen a before & after testing with stock paste vs liquid metal. I repasted my GTX 1070 with Kryonaut when I modded the back plate to aid in cooling. I do have quite a bit of Liquid Ultra left over from my CPU delid, so that could be something I'd consider using on my GPU, but I think I remember some @Mr. Fox tests where he found that liquid ultra didn't improve GPU cooling efficiency vs non-conductive pastes? His tests are laptop based, I wonder if liquid ultra on GPU would show bigger performance benefit? Have you tried overclocking your GPU, would be interesting to see where you could end up? Oh, and for your liquid ultra on your GPU, what precautions did you take around the GPU core to protect some of those parts from any leakage of liquid ultra?
     
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  7. TBoneSan

    TBoneSan Laptop Fiend

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    @Robbo99999 yeah bro, I wish I was more scientific with measuring the GPU improvements. I wasn't too bothered because I've also found over the years Liquid Metal to not make any meaningful difference on the GPU. If I've ever had any gains with it, it's been too inconsequential to bother recommending. I've heard people on YouTube claim they reduce temps by 10 degrees with Pasqal, then the other goofs who spread on the core and forget to spread on the Heatsink claim they only get 1 degree reductions. In all fairness it's probably somewhere in between.
    I want to say that GPU fan speed was around 70% before and around 49% now, which is what I've noticed, but I can't say that that with any accuracy. I'll start testing what kind of overclock I can get soon. I'm going to set my fan limit to around 70% - anything beyond that enters hairdryer territory on the blower cards.I'd be happy if I can get 2000 Ghz.
    Applying the metal, all I did was cover the little metal parts (capacitors?) around the GPU core with heat resistance tape. I'd say it's worth doing if even just for kicks. There's nothing to loose and the card barely has to be disassembled to repaste.
     
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  8. Robbo99999

    Robbo99999 Notebook Prophet

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    Yeah, you don't want it sounding like a hair dryer, so good call on the 70% fan limit. Yeah, it's a fairly simple operation repasting the card, and I've got some Kapton tape to cover parts of the GPU. So it's better to put liquid metal on the heatsink as well as the chip? Do you put the thinnest layer possible on the heatsink, I'm thinking you would spread it as thin as possible on the heatsink? Is there a different technique or anything to know about applying liquid metal to the heatsink that's different to applying it to the chip? I've applied liquid metal to a CPU chip before (my CPU during Delid - hardest part was getting the small ball of paste to detach from the syringe!), but never applied it to a metal surface, so want to try & avoid surprises! Not sure if I'm gonna put liquid metal on my GPU, but I'm considering it for now. And you say you saw about a 20% reduction in fan speed going from standard paste to liquid metal, that's a pretty big difference?

    Will be interesting to hear how you get on with your overclock, and maybe some Firestrike comparisons.

    EDIT: I think the biggest thing that might prevent me from putting liquid metal (CLU) on my GPU is the ease of repasting. I've never had to remove CLU and I've heard accounts of it staining heat sinks & then needed to be polished off. I'm also wondering if it would need to be polished off if repasting later with the same CLU. And then if I choose to go back to Kryonaut for any reason, then I'm thinking heatsink would need to be polished off for max performance. CLU on the heatsink is feeling a little permanent?
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2017
  9. Rengsey R. H. Jr.

    Rengsey R. H. Jr. I Never Slept

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    What benchmark 3dmark11 performance score are you getting with this setup?
     
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  10. Robbo99999

    Robbo99999 Notebook Prophet

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    Hi TBoneSan, what happened, you've not blown up something with your overclocking attempts have you! ;-) Well in all seriousness I hope you haven't, how did it go?
     
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