My test of Win8 CP

Discussion in 'Windows OS and Software' started by Pirx, Mar 3, 2012.

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  1. Hungry Man

    Hungry Man Notebook Virtuoso

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    I'm on an awful connection right now. I edited my post - it just took forever. I'd, of course, meant to put that in originally.
     
  2. TheAtreidesHawk

    TheAtreidesHawk Notebook Deity

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    It just feels very weird and awkward...at best.

    At worst I feel like Windows 8 is just gonna drive me insane. Simple things that I used to be able to do in Win7 feel like they take an eternity or impossible to do in Windows 8.
     
  3. Aeyix

    Aeyix Notebook Evangelist

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    There are a lot of new features in Windows 8 that I'm loving. But, I just can't get passed the lack of a Start Button for the Start Screen. The switch to the Start Screen being in the bottom left corner, 'app' & program switching being in the top left corner, and charms in the right side are fairly annoying to me. If there was a way to keep the same Windows 7 styled interfaces with the new Windows 8 features, I'd buy it. But as of now. I don't see myself getting Windows 8 anytime soon purely because of the Start Screen. It isn't that bad, and I think on a tablet or touch interface PC it would be great. But for a power user such as myself using hotkeys and mouse or touchpad, the Metro UI start screen just isn't as easy to navigate as it should be with keyboard or mouse. And, actually, it takes longer to navigate certain things or do certain functions than what the start button allows me. For this reason alone, I don't care for it.

    Change is good, and often necessary. But this complete UI overhaul is not great for mouse&keyboard interfaces in my opinion. I've used Windows 98 SE, ME, XP, Vista, 7, Ubuntu, LinuxMint, and whatever the Mac OS was back in 2000-2002 and their UIs have always been similar in style (the only UI of all of them I hate is Ubuntu with Unity). Otherwise they all work and simple for me to use. The Start Screen is clearly innovation and a radical change from anything we've seen before. And for me, it just doesn't work.

    I have many Microsoft software devices. The one's already using Metro would be my Xbox 360 and Windows Phone 7 which I love and have no issues with the Metro UI on. However, on my laptop, I just don't care for it and this alone is enough for me to pass on Windows 8. Going from XP to Vista wasn't that big of a leap, the addition of the Aero Desktop was nice. The addition of better driver support and the Taskbar has made Windows 7 my favorite of anything. I've only been using Win 7 since August so I feel as if I could go a lot longer with it.
     
  4. halladayrules

    halladayrules Notebook Guru

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    I have dubbed it the Windows 8 shutdown challenge.

    I dual booted Windows 8 on my laptop and challenged my friends and family to shutdown the machine in under 2 minutes. 8 out of 10 failed.
     
  5. Hungry Man

    Hungry Man Notebook Virtuoso

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    It's almost as if a new UI has a learning curve.

    EDIT: Also, a tip to see all apps.

    Metro start menu -> right click area -> All Apps.

    That easy.
     
  6. TANWare

    TANWare Just This Side of Senile, I think. Super Moderator

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    I just installed as a dual boot, still want to give it a chance and have noticed a few things.

    Since no longer upgraded I am on a true install at full boot.

    1.) ram usage is way down. It now can run on 2GB easily x64
    2.) single threads are handled differently.
    3.) no more power down issues.

    There is no more with an app setting affinity from the Task Manager. This goes to item 2 above. I'll use SuperPI 1.5 as my example here. I should note since Win7 was already optimized for iCore individual threads this may not apply, it only applies to CQD as there are two physical cores.

    This is running at 3.2 GHz on my Q9200 and SuperPI at 2m.

    Win7;
    1.) no affinity set = 42s
    2.) Affinity core 0,1 = 36s
    3.) Affinity core 0 = 36s

    Win8;
    1.) Affinity not avail = 36s

    Now in task manager there may be a clue. Here is what is observed again running SuperPI at 2m looking at all four individual cores.

    Win7;
    Each of the fours cores seems to run a shared load approximating 25% for each core. This is fairly steady through the run.

    Win8;
    The load for each core seems to interleave at 100%. you no longer have each core running along side one another on the same task just one at a time.

    My theory then falls to this, now this will not be realized or barely if at all noticed in a C2D. The biggest performance hit in the CQD is the fact that when a thread is split and run simultaneously the CPU has to split memory loading, and off loading, to the two cores. This duplication of the memory essentially slows the CPU down where a significant performance hit happens to non affinity set threads.

    Windows 8 seems to have eliminated this by taking the affinity and just moving it from core to core. It also seems to better keep the tasks at core 0,1 and then 2,3 as well but I have yet to fully test that out.....................
     

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  7. jotm

    jotm Notebook Evangelist

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    @TANWare, that's pretty interesting - so Windows 8 basically uses each core until it's 100% loaded, then switches to the 2nd, 3rd and so on. That should indeed make things faster since single threaded apps are shuffled much less between cores. Win7 slows everything down because it has to load all cores evenly all the time...
     
  8. TANWare

    TANWare Just This Side of Senile, I think. Super Moderator

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    It doesn't look to load the cores but interleaves the load. only one core at a time hitting the L1, L2 and main memory. Makes for a huge difference in the CQD.

    I ran 3dmark06 with the CPU @ 2.66 GHz. On Win 7 it was 3818 CPU marks and on Win 8 it was 4212 cpu marks at 3.2 GHz Windows 7 gives 4505 CPU marks and Windows 8 4927............

    I finally installed system tools to correct clock my GPU for windows 8. The GPU scores were not majorly different. maybe slightly higher in Windows 7 but not something that can be definately looked at with any significance.

    So it appears a preliminary result is the new thread handling gives out about a 10% or better increase in performance for the CQD................

    Edit; I used to be a big detractor for CQD's as with XP, Vista and windows 7 the thread handling took a huge per clock performance hit over the C2D, this OS seems to have solved that issue quite a bit. It would be wonderfull if it made it too Win7 SP2.............
     
  9. funky monk

    funky monk Notebook Deity

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    Wait, so we can't select cores manually anymore?

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Pirx

    Pirx Notebook Virtuoso

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    By the way, here is a very well considered critique of Windows 8, along with what I feel is a fairly good enumeration of the main drivers of Windows' evolution: Windows 8: A Giant Misstep Forward

    Well worth reading, I think. Feel free to comment.
     
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