My test of Win8 CP

Discussion in 'Windows OS and Software' started by Pirx, Mar 3, 2012.

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  1. cassar

    cassar Notebook Evangelist

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    first hour of install on desktop i was lost i didn't know if i want it or not after spending few hours on it i find it joyful very easy and a lot faster than windows 7 in fact im going to make my main OS on desktop, laptop and future tablet when the final version released i really like it a lot
     
  2. niharjhatn

    niharjhatn Notebook Evangelist

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    As some one who has resisted change, I too found the linux ubuntu distro switch from gnome 2 to unity hard to stomach... but after spending some time with it, I eventually found it almost unbearable to use anything else.

    Windows 8 is riding a very fine line though. Some features are pretty awesome - e.g. LOVE the search - exactly how I use unity, search for everything! :D but dislike the convoluted mouse movements. It is riding a fine line between being a hindrance and a different way of doing things.

    I daresay metro may be less "forced" in the final release. If apps etc are implemented correctly, however, I see no real reason why many of the more "home" users (think outdated parents :D) will not enjoy windows 8.

    The pseudo-hibernate shutdown/startup (if implemented correctly) would be neat though - my win 7 startup time on an i7 (1st gen) has skyrocketed, almost twice as long compared to an old core 2 duo 2007 macbook.
     
  3. TANWare

    TANWare Just This Side of Senile, I think. Super Moderator

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    I found myself on the dektop most of the time. I tieid the metro apps out but with mixed results. I could not do a straight shut down as there was a thread error and it just restarted me.

    I use RocketDoc so this saved me from loosing the start button. It is what I use all the time anyway. Why if you are working a desktop do you want to constantly have to switch over to metro to launch a new app and be switched back to the desktop?

    I can see where as a social machine, IM'ng, web email, social sites and even MM stuff Metro could be great over time. For productivity all I can say is YUCK. Win8 needs some major changes to bring it back to Win7's level of use for productivity and then further to go to make it worth an upgrade.

    Metro is a memory HOG. those running apps take up some ram. Where with win7 I rarely see 2.5 GB ever get use up and usually run at 2GB metro had me running 3.2GB like nothing just a few apps. Now with 8GB this is not an issue but those with just 4 should watch out.

    I want to like it, I really do. I even tried it twice and if things change a third time. For now I see where as an entertainment machine and social communication device this may make it. Problem is we already have extremely portable communication and MM devices out there.

    I should note IE10 was awesome and some of the Metro apps were nice like weather, music and camera. For all its productivity issues the few cute functional metro apps do not give Win8 a passing grade.

    As another side note; Most want eye candy! This is why we spend so much for powerful nachines and demand high resolution. Win8 to me is a major step backwards here. The biggest issue is this will be forced on all new systems eventually, what a shame (maybe time to relearn linux or hackentosh?)...................
     
  4. superman3486

    superman3486 Notebook Consultant

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    installed W8 on my elitebook and the only thing it did for me was hated my laptop even more lol, I couldn't stand the metro interface and especially the stupid lock screen / login screen. I reverted back to my W7 pro install after a few hours of playing around with that junk UI, this OS is made for tablets/touchscreen computing.

    I felt all the power user interface was gone. W8 is also target for grandma or grandpa that dont know how to navigate all that well.

    The only thing I look forward to is W7 Sp2!
     
  5. Mitlov

    Mitlov Shiny

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    Well, under the current system, your Start menu gets more and more populated, so you have to scroll and scroll to find the programs you want. For people who have seventy programs installed instead of seventeen, it's going to be difficult either way. Once I re-arranged the programs into sensible groups based on how I used them (as opposed to their publisher), with the most-used groups and most productivity-oriented groups furthest to the left, I found it really easy to tap Start, click a program, and go. Much faster than the start menu in my opinion.

    You're right, moving a tile into the right place in your Metro UI every time you install a program is a bit of work. Not a lot though; they move easy enough. It's really just one click-and-drag every time you install a new program.
     
  6. killkenny1

    killkenny1 Too weird to live, too rare to die.

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    Just remember to do it ASAP after installing the program(s). Or it will be a real PITA if you try to organize everything at once after a while.
     
  7. SemiExpert

    SemiExpert Notebook Consultant

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    This is the most puzzling aspect of Windows 8. There are reports of a possible Windows 8 "power regression" causing major drops in battery life on notebooks in comparison to Windows 7, reports of excessive hard drive activity, and excessive RAM usage. I think we all know that most current ARM devices are shipping with no more than 1 GB of RAM, and at best, upcoming ARM devices will only be offering 2GB when Windows 8 launches.

    How does any of this make sense for a mobile, touchscreen oriented operating system? Is Microsoft really serious about Windows 8?

    Actually, I find that I pin the two of three most commonly used applications ot the task bar and simply use desktop shortcuts for less frequently used programs. It's quick and simple, and the folder view start menu in Windows 7 is reasonably compact.
     
  8. MidnightSun

    MidnightSun Emodicon

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    When W7 was first released, I got noticeably less battery life in it than with Vista. I'd pin that on the lack of optimized W8 drivers at the moment.
     
  9. Pirx

    Pirx Notebook Virtuoso

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    Oh, so that's all? Awesome. You know that you can do this with a single click on the Taskbar from the desktop, right? Or, use the same keystroke and click on the Start Menu. So, what is it again that Metro does for me here?

    No, it doesn't. First of all, keep in mind that you have single-click access to a significant number of items on your desktop already. I have about twenty items on my Taskbar, quite a few of which have jumplists as well. Frequently used folders are, of course, already present as jumplists (either automatically, or pinned, or both) from the Explorer shortcut on the Taskbar. I am also using a dock on the left side, so I have single-click access to roughly 30 items right from my desktop. With the two clicks that are needed for the Metro nonsense, I can easily get access to a few hundred items in Taskbar and dock if that is what I decide I need or want. So, how's that Metro screen treating you with, say, 150 tiles on there?

    Now, at this point I haven't even touched the Start Menu once. Of course, that will also offer me two-click access to a significant number of items. I counted 27 in my start menu, but I could easily extend it to hold 40-50. So now we're at almost 200 items I have two-click access to. Still with me on your Metro screen?

    Most importantly, however, pretty much the only reason I ever go to the start menu is those obscure little utilities, or perhaps the Control Panel, that I need very rarely. But if I need them, it is very easy to find those items by going through the well-structured hierarchy of the Start Menu. I just checked, and I happen to have a total of over 1000 items (not a typo) in my start menu. Not everyone will have that many, but a few hundred is not unusual at all. Some applications install 10, 15 start menu items for themselves. How do you think that Metro screen will treat you with 1000 tiles?

    Sure, you can remove some stuff, and then use Search to find a shortcut. So, let's say I'd like to look at the Help file for some obscure little app. I type "Help", up pop a couple dozen choices. Good luck... By the time I have managed to find what I need I may have forgotten what I was doing on my desktop, which has disappeared, for no good reason, while I am trying to find that Help link.

    See, there's two main issues here:

    Number one, the Metro screen does not truly allow for a hierarchical organization (which, by the way, both iOS and Android do provide), which severely limits what can be accomplished with it.

    Number two, the switch to the Metro screen takes you out of your current work context, and is needlessly disruptive because of that. Heck, all I want is to start a program like I have done hundreds of times before. There's no need for me to look at and potentially be distracted by all sorts of crap on a pretty screen ("Oh, look, Apple stock just went up 20% after the Win8 CP was released", "Wow, Santorum said what, again?", etc., etc.).

    No, you don't. It's very easy to implement a hierarchy in the Start Menu in such a way that you'll never have to scroll, ever. This is in stark contrast to the Metro screen, which does not give you that option, at all. Sure, if you only have maybe one or two dozen items you care about, it kind of works, but it fails completely if there's more.

    It's going to be difficult in Metro, but there's no issue with the start menu.

    That's an illusion. It's not objectively faster at all. Remember, for the few items you are talking about here, a single-click on the Taskbar is all you need. On the Start Menu, it's two clicks (or key+click), exactly the same as in Metro. The difference with the Start Menu is, it stays out of the way entirely when it's not needed, and when I need to go to it, it stays out of the way as much as possible, without needlessly interrupting visual continuity.

    At this point I haven't even started talking about the abomination of having two wildly different design languages randomly intermixed, namely the Aero-Glass theme of the desktop, versus the Mickey-Mouse graphics of Metro. Microsoft, and others, had invested millions into taking advantage of the graphics capabilities of modern hardware, in order to harness them for better productivity rather than just eye candy. With Metro all of a sudden all of that is thrown out the window (pun intended). That decision made a minimal amount of sense when you had to deal with the limited performance of last-generation phone hardware. Even with the latest generation phones, let alone tablets, laptops, and desktops, this makes no sense at all.
     
  10. Pirx

    Pirx Notebook Virtuoso

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    By the way, I fully agree with this. There's plenty of things to like about Windows 8, but the UI isn't one of them.
     
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