MSI Keyboard on Clevo P170EM

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by jorgehumberto, Mar 6, 2019.

  1. BlameTheEx

    BlameTheEx Notebook Geek

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    @senso Um no. It doesn't work that way. Think of a keyboard as a separate powered component with its own processor. There is no direct connection between individual keys and the laptop. Instead they all connect to the keyboards processor which transmits a byte for each keystroke. So in a way they are ALL compatible. They all output bytes. Its just that the meaning of any byte number depends on the keyboard. That because what a particular key does depends on the language. So the only difference between two keyboards of the same model but different languages is the printing on the keys and the entries in the translation table.

    It's a very basic system that has lasted many years. That and standardisation makes it very cheap. And it works perfectly so nobody is going to mess with it.
     
  2. senso

    senso Notebook Evangelist

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    Nope..

    Take one apart if you want, a laptop keyboard is just a column/row matrix that is decoded by the EC, there is no electronics in a laptop keyboard, at all, and they are all different because there is no standard.
     
  3. BlameTheEx

    BlameTheEx Notebook Geek

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    https://computer.howstuffworks.com/keyboard2.htm

    There you go.

    You, I think, were under the impression that each key pressed 2 switches to give a location on a matrix. Not so. Only one switch and LOTS of evidence on the net for it. Each key has a unique return path on the circuit board that backs the keys.

    Video showing single switch and no matrix:


    If the signals sent were not consolidated by a processor of sorts then the flat cable linking keyboard to laptop would need somewhere in the order of 100 or more separate lines. One for each key plus any lights, earths, at least one power. Plenty of pictures on the net showing far less than that.

    Keyboard connector picture:
    http://www.laptoprepair101.com/fix-broken-keyboard-connector-on-laptop-motherboard/
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2019
  4. jorgehumberto

    jorgehumberto Notebook Enthusiast

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    @BlameTheEx

    OK, that was awesome. That means that in theory I could swap out the circuit board from one keyboard to the other one and get it working? Of course easier said than done, i once tried it and the circuit board was not as flexible as the one in the video and fell apart...

    but it is good to know that it can be done, I might try it with the bad keyboards I have at home just for fun....

    Cheers
    Jorge
     
  5. BlameTheEx

    BlameTheEx Notebook Geek

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    @jorgehumberto

    No sadly it doesn't.

    There is still the matter of the flat cable inside leading from the laptop. If not model specific there are bound to be different versions. Extra lines dependent on the number of LED's and such.

    You lucked out to get as far as you did.

    If you play around you are bound to short something out and then you have a dead laptop.
     
  6. jorgehumberto

    jorgehumberto Notebook Enthusiast

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    @BlameTheEx

    Well, in my case, the LED and keyboard circuit have different flat cables and both are compatible with the laptop connectors. At least the backligth works nicely :)

    Many thanks for the explanations!

    Cheers
    Jorge
     
  7. senso

    senso Notebook Evangelist

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    That "circuit" is the EC in a laptop!

    A desktop keyboard as the circuit because it then talks either PS/2 or USB, even today some laptops expose the keyboard as a PS/2 interface between the EC and the chipset...

    But, ok, if you dont believe that a laptop keyboard is made in a row column matrix(like every other keyboard on the planet), be happy with that..
     
  8. jorgehumberto

    jorgehumberto Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hi @senso


    Ok, so what you mean is that an external laptop has a circuit interface between the keyboard matrix and the motherboard/EC, while a laptop keyboard works exactly the same, but there is no such interface and the matrix interfaces directly with the EC?

    Cheers
    Jorge
     
  9. BlameTheEx

    BlameTheEx Notebook Geek

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    I had the decency to not just assume you was wrong and I was right. I went and checked.
    Sometimes when I check I find I was the idiot. Then I admit it and life goes on.
    Check my posts and you will find it true.

    Not this time.
    Have the decency to read my explanation and check the evidence I posted.
     
  10. senso

    senso Notebook Evangelist

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    I worked for Asus, MSI and Lenovo repair center for 4 years doing component level repairs..
    I have worked with hundreds of SKU's, there is NOT a single laptop with any chip doing matrix decoding in the keyboard itself..
     
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