MSI GT73VR 7RF Titan Pro-425 Review By Phoenix

Discussion in 'MSI Reviews & Owners' Lounges' started by Ultra Male, Feb 9, 2017.

  1. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    You still have yet to answer my question. I asked if you have a skylake or kaby lake. 6820Hk or 7820HK. That's important.

    can you please download AIDA64 trial version, and do a 5 minute "System stability test", and then post the screenshot, with "HWinfo64" running in the background please? Make sure the CPU VID, CPU temps, and the CPU "package power" (watts) is shown in the window. Thank you.
     
  2. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKS = That sucks! Dont wast your $$ on FILTH

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    He talk about default 4100. I'm quite sure Msi offered the predecessor 6820hk@4.0GHz:rolleyes: And I don't even have a Msibook, bruh:D
     
  3. EasyCome

    EasyCome Notebook Enthusiast

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    That's the 7820HK, since this thread is about MSI GT73VR 7RF Titan Pro, I thought it went without saying, that I had the same notebook as the OP, and, Papusan mentioned it correctly that the default 4.1Ghz corresponds to the '17 model. :) Sorry, I wasn't clear enough.
     
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  4. EasyCome

    EasyCome Notebook Enthusiast

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    Anyone tried manual voltage for different MHz speeds?
     
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  5. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    Manual voltage will not work properly without an unlocked Bios.
    Setting 1.17v manual voltage will pour about 1.3v (this will be about the maximum, based approximately on 80 amps), depending on load, into that poor CPU at heavy load (the less load, the less voltage boost).

    First: here is what happens if you set 1.145v at 4500 mhz with MSI's auto settings you have no access to.

    Notice that the full idle VID is showing up as 1.243v, while the load VID is showing up as 1.184v. This is completely inaccurate. In fact the idle VID is probably close to 1.184v but the full load VID is close to 1.270v. This will become obvious when you see the third picture.

    THESE PICTURES ARE PRIME95 WITH AVX DISABLED ( CPUSupportsAVX=0 and CPUSupportsFMA3=0 in local.txt. If AVX were enabled in either test 1 or 3, the laptop would instantly turn off at start of prime95.

    1) 1.145v, 4500 mhz, IA AC DC loadline=MSI Auto settings (Intel reference value=2.10 mOhms).
    Please compare the temps from picture 1 with picture 3 for a wow factor.

    1145mv_IAACDCLOADLINE_0.jpg


    2) 1.178v, 4500 mhz, IA AC DC loadline=1 (0.01 mOhms) set with unlocked Bios.
    1178mv_iaacdcloadline_1.jpg

    3) 4700 mhz, 1.275v, IA AC DC loadline=1 (0.01 mOhms). note: the 12k test had just finished. I did a hwinfo window move fail. So same prime settiings.

    Notice that the temps with higher set vcore and higher mhz is the same as picture 1? That should have you scratching your head big time.
    1275mv_iaacdcloadline_1.jpg


    Yeah.
    Even Phoenix is scratching his head at that one.
    And @Papusan is vomiting mad at cancer firmwares :)

    Temps in test 1, with 1.145v at 4500 mhz, with MSI default IA AC DC loadline (2.10 mOhms), are IDENTICAL to test 3, with 1.275v, at 4700 mhz, with IA AC DC loadline=1 (0.01 mOhms).
    And since frequency also increases current, it's very obvious that the "true" voltages (which we cannot see because there is NO live VCORE SENSOR ON THESE LAPTOPS, only some Clevos have VCORE sensors. VID is NOT live VCORE!!) at 4500 mhz picture#1 *had* to be at least slightly higher than the true vcore in picture#3, to get same temps but compensate for the mhz difference.

    If you don't have the unlocked Bios, and want to use static voltages, you have to deal with strange voltage boosting like that, and the higher the amps, the more the VID boost, so you have no idea what your poor cpu is getting.

    Svet on the official MSI forums can unlock your bios for a donation (usually $20 Eur) or you can take the risk and read paloseco's guide in the main MSI section and try to unlock it yourself so you can access that setting.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2018
  6. EasyCome

    EasyCome Notebook Enthusiast

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    Yeah, I see. I was going to ask about Prime95 settings, but you beat me. My findings show that with 400vr limit and 100 voltage offset the thermal throttling occurs even at 3800mhz during gameplay in Vermintide2. This game is CPU heavy, and shows well the limitations of the notebook cooling limitations. The TIM is gelid extreme. Actually, I haven't tried monitoring the default CPU setting, maybe the throttling occurs even at default voltages at 3900mhz.

    Also, how much something like this (http://www.coolermaster.com/cooling/notepal-series/notepal-xl/) might help with temps? Are these things a gimmick or might actually shove off 2-5 degrees?
     
  7. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    You should not be thermal throttling on this at all.
    100 voltage offset?
    is that NEGATIVE or POSITIVE?
    May I ask you where and what program/utility you entered this voltage offset at?

    Is there any chance you can post a screenshot?
    Download Cinebench R15, and HWinfo64 please. Install both.

    cinebench:
    https://www.maxon.net/en/products/cinebench/
    HWinfo64:
    https://www.hwinfo.com/download.php

    Do 3 CPU loops of cinebench R15 consecutively, without pausing the test.
    Post the screenshot after the last test, with the HWinfo64 window showing also.
    Make sure CPU VID, temps, package power (Watts) are all visible.

    If it's not too much trouble, if you can have the second and third HWInfo windows visible as well (basically, when you scroll down in HWinfo (there is a way to do this)) that has the power limit and voltage/thermal limit flag with yes and no, showing, that would also help a little.
     
  8. EasyCome

    EasyCome Notebook Enthusiast

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    The offset was entered in BIOS, it is positive, I suppose.
    I should not be throttling at all you mean on the CM stand or with the current settings?
     
  9. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    The offset in Bios is ALWAYS positive!
    To enter a NEGATIVE offset in Bios, you need to go to the "Overclocking Performance Menu" which you have no access to right now.

    Can you please take those screenshots for me with those 2 programs i asked about ? I want to see just how much you were torturing that poor CPU with that +100mv offset :)

    I need to see this because I need to see your CPU's default VID. (which I can see just by subtracting -100mv from your offset and THEN trying to use voodoo magic to compensate for the IA AC DC 2.10 mOhms VID boost (translation: good luck).
     
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  10. EasyCome

    EasyCome Notebook Enthusiast

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    Okay, I will. So I suppose I need to reset the +100mv offset back to 0 in the bios?
     
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