*** MSI 16L13 (Eurocom Tornado F5)/EVOC 16L-G-1080 15.6" Owner's Lounge ***

Discussion in 'MSI Reviews & Owners' Lounges' started by Diversion, Oct 14, 2016.

  1. Rahego

    Rahego Notebook Consultant

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    Do you use XMP profile in BIOS? If setting correct XMP profile wont help - you should write to SVET and ask him about this ram. It's possible that first BIOS might not support this kind of speeds.
     
  2. Nguyen Hoang Tu

    Nguyen Hoang Tu Newbie

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    Hi everyone.
    I have a few questions
    I'm using Eurocom F5 with gtx970m. Now i want to upgrade to gtx 1060 or 1070 but don't know Buy what kind of it and where.
    Can you show me what kind of it and where to buy it.
    And i using CPU i7 6700, Can i upgrade to i7 8th and how to setup?
    If who selling used graphic for Eurocom F5, can you sell for me?
    And i saw in thread everyone upgrade to 144hz screen, so can i buy what kind to upgrade my laptop?
    Thanks everyone.
     
  3. FrozenLord

    FrozenLord Notebook Consultant

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    Hey there,

    today I'd like to offer you instructions for a ghetto mod for our laptop :)

    Short backstory:
    My F5 (1080GTX, 6700K) has been struggling with high-ish GPU temperatures for some time.
    After decent tweaking, I only ever managed to get it to cool down somwhere between 110W and 120W (going by HWInfo64) of GPU power.
    Anytime I would average higher than 120W, it would steadily heat up to the dreaded 90°C and throttle.
    To remedy this, I tried:
    > undervolting the GPU (I am currently at 862.5mV and ~ 1.72 GHz in Afterburner)
    > repaste several times (I did try with IC Diamond 7, Phobya HeGrease Extreme, Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut)
    > limit my frames to 60 FPS (via Rivatuner Statistics Server)
    > drill fan holes in my bottom cover (I have posted an image about that in this thread)
    > replace the GPU's thermal pads (I did try Arctic Cooling's normal pads at first and K5 Pro afterwards, the second being a liquid thermal pad which basically guarantees that it is not too thick and thereby pushing up the heatsink)
    > slightly raising my laptop from the surface it is standing on (I am using small decouplers meant for speakers - they are made from black rubber and lift the laptop by about 1.5cm)
    > distancing the GPU heatsink's arm from the CPU heatsink (which did not really affect temperatures at all)
    > adding a 1.5mm thermal pad between the GPU heatsink's arm and the CPU heatsink (which did help a little bit)
    > modded EC firmware to change the fan curve and go up to MSI's maximum of 150% of the fan's RPM

    All those ideas did help somewhat, but only ever brought me to where I am not able to average higher than about 120W.
    Or put differently: the stock VBIOS (as well as the optimized one that has been posted in the beginning of this thread) allow for 150W of power, which results in me missing out on 30W of GPU
    And just to add it: I do know about laptop coolers (which I don't want to rely on for portability reasons) as well as liquid metal (which seems too risky to me)

    After some deliberation about how to improve the cooling, I realized that the GPU's heatsink might not make perfect contact.
    When I repasted afterwards, I made sure to check the remaining thermal paste.
    And while the layer on the GPU was not too thick, the paste had dried at the edges, suggesting a skewed fit.
    Considering that I had not achieved better results with the repastes, I concluded that it might be the heatsink (or its fixing) that is the problem.
    I did give bending the arms a few seconds of thought, but one of them is directly hitting the heatpipe behind it, which practically prevents it from bending.

    The solution I came up with is to add a blank copper plate on top of the heatsink, which gets screwed to the GPU, and using a thermal pad of 1.0mm thickness to use as buffer.
    By drilling holes in the copper plate, one is able to replace the flimsy heatsink arms with a sturdy plate that is pushing down on the heatsink, thereby increasing the pressure on the GPU.
    I did use a copper plate of 1.0mm thickness that was cut to a size of 90mm by 70mm.
    The heatsink's screws seem to be positioned as a square of 45mm edge length (at least that is what I used for drilling).
    Copper can be easily drilled through - I have used a cheap cordless screwdriver (or electric drill, not sure about the translation) with a drill of 2.1mm diameter meant for metal.
    The GPU's threading is M2 and my setup did go nicely with screws of about 14.5mm in length (I was not sure when ordering and had to shorten them manually) and countersunk heads.
    However, it will be a little bit tricky to thread the screws through the heatsink's arms and into the GPU heatsink's threading.
    Unfortunately, I can't offer any specific advice on screwing down the plate as I have no idea how to do it correctly.
    When I screwed it down, I basically went with my gut feeling, paying special attention to the resistance of the screws turning and stopped once I deemed the resistance high enough.
    This way, I tried to balance the four screws to have about the same resistance.

    Should you think about doing this mod, please be aware that the combination of 1mm of thermal pad plus the 1mm of copper plate plus the protruding screw head is already touching the bottom cover.
    While I am still able to close it perfectly, I am not sure whether the same would be true for 1.5mm or even 2.0mm of copper.
    Thermal.jpg After.jpg

    For completeness sake, this is what my poor F5 looks like now:
    Overall.jpg

    Overall, after installing this mod I have not seen temperatures climb above 78°C yet.
    Running the Firestrike Stress Test (without FPS limit) results in this:
    Results.jpg

    Word of warning: I have installed the copper plate in my laptop 2 days ago and have used it for gaming and benchmarking for several hours since then.
    While it did not show any adverse signs yet, there is of course no guarantee that it will continue working flawlessly.
    Should it break down any time soon, I will of course add the information to this post - until then, feel free to assume that I am still sporting this mod and am still happy with it :)

    Status as of 23rd of February 2020: still going strong, temperatures basically unchanged (I got greedy and switched to 1.809 GHz @ 0.85V, my max temp is still 79°C)
    Status as of 23rd of March 2020: still unchanged, i.e. no problems and same temp :)
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2020
  4. qwerty8224

    qwerty8224 Notebook Guru

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    @FrozenLord
    can make a plate more to cover the heat pipes CPU ?
     
  5. Rahego

    Rahego Notebook Consultant

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    @FrozenLord rly interesting stuff. Thank you for sharing.

    So what u basically did was putting more pressure - which means better fit. Can u post pics with some benchmarks + hwinfo? On ur screen i cant see W and usage.

    PS. amazing is that this mod can be used on most of the laptops and its rly cheap. I will try it on my P870
     
    Huniken likes this.
  6. FrozenLord

    FrozenLord Notebook Consultant

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    Yes, I would guess so.
    However, as I did not cut the copper sheets myself but ordered them online, I wanted to play it safe and go with a size for which I am confident that it would work.
    Looking at how I placed the copper sheet, I would assume that you could make it stretch further in all directions.
    Stretching towards the back of the laptop is of course going to be the first one to hit a limit, as the heatpipes on my device (don't know whether that's normal or slightly bent) are moving closer to the bottom lid at that point.
    It's a similar story with the CPU heatpipes as they are not necessarily level with the GPU's heatsink.
    Therefore, I would advise to check your device regarding how level the different areas are and checking where you would be able to make contact with a perfectly flat copper plate.

    You're very welcome.

    I am not 100% sure where the gain is coming from exactly.
    It might be that the pressure on the GPU was just not enough to get a decent fit.
    However, going by the picture, I would also assume that the pressure should have been fine but that the heatsink is skewed.
    If you look at the top left and right corner, the thermal paste seems to have dried.
    Paste on GPU.jpg
    And yes, I am not saving on thermal paste, as I really don't enjoy taking apart the heatsink and don't want to risk using too little.
    I tend to use way to much, knowing that excess amounts will just be pushed out of the way (and will pile up next to the GPU).
    The white stuff all around is K5 Pro, which when exposed to heat over some time changes from the semi-liquid goo to a kind of rubbery texture.

    Additionally, the mod does add copper (weight and surface) to the cooling system which might help a little bit as well.
    And the mod does offer a kind of link between the heatpipes and might result in them being used more efficiently.
    Maybe one of those heatpipes is not making (good) contact with the heatsink and therefore not transferring heat away in the intended way.

    And just for completeness sake, these are my EC settings:
    EC Table.png

    Going into the measurement side, I did go through the Fire Strike Ultra Stress Test - and failed, with 92.8%.
    3D Mark Fire Strike Ultra Stress Test.jpg
    While I am not sure why it failed, it does not seem to be GPU related as the GPU was fully loaded during the whole test.

    And just to recheck, I did the Fire Strike (non-ultra) Stress Test again - it passed with 98.4%.
    3D Mark Fire Strike Stress Test.jpg

    I have attached the HWInfo64 monitoring logs for both runs as zipped CSV files, both of which are unchanged besides having the serial numbers removed.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jan 17, 2020
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  7. Semmy

    Semmy Notebook Consultant

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    On these laptops, the GPU heat sink is mounted without springs as on a CPU. Therefore, it can be slightly bent up. That will give him more downforce. I did the same on my msi gt62, the heat sink contact of the GPU is pretty good.
    In addition, you do not need so much thermal paste. Just a little will be enough. Here is my fingerprint on gtx 1060, this is quite enough

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2020
  8. FrozenLord

    FrozenLord Notebook Consultant

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    I beg to differ.
    At first, I did try to bend the arms.
    However, the arm on the top right in the picture is directly below the heatpipe and - while trying to bend it - will collide with it.
    For that reason, I did not try to go further into this, as the top arms of my GPU's heatsink were already showing too little pressure / the bottom arms were pressing too hard.
    That problem has (so far) been solved by the 4 screws and a copper plate.

    Regarding the amount of thermal paste on the GPU, I do agree, as mentioned above ;-)
     
  9. Semmy

    Semmy Notebook Consultant

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    Then you need to align these legs as much as possible. And try to bend two legs diagonally. And the other 2 leave on the same level

    [​IMG]
     
  10. yrekabakery

    yrekabakery Notebook Virtuoso

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    You could also try putting paper clips under the arms to increase pressure. That's what some of us have done on the Clevo P7 series.
     
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