Moving from Windows to Mac OS - Pro's and Con's

Discussion in 'What Notebook Should I Buy?' started by aspectratio1, Sep 26, 2012.

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  1. aspectratio1

    aspectratio1 Notebook Enthusiast

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    Right now I am looking at the Macbook Air 13" and the Samsung Series 9 13". The only question I have is with the MAC OS.

    All my work and home PCs are Windows. I have Windows Adobe software and Windows MS Office.

    My Work server is a linux file server. I also have a NAS Server at home.

    I carry with me a portable hard drive which sync's the entire server on my windows PC.

    Can anyone see a problem I may have if I buy a MBAir and working with my current setup?
    Last year someone brought their MBP laptop to work and they had trouble staying connected to our Linux Server. The server kept getting disconnected. I don't want to have that trouble.
     
  2. Karamazovmm

    Karamazovmm Overthinking? Always!

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    I cant see any problem with that. if they fixed whatever the server was misconfigured them its a non issue.

    the only thing is that you are either going to run your windows programs on windows or you are going to have to purchase the ms office for mac, I dont know what adobe software you have nor your license.
     
  3. Bronsky

    Bronsky Wait and Hope.

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    If you lived on a desert island that only had an Apple Store and FedEx or UPS did not deliver to your island, I would get the Apple. As grounded as you are in Windows, I would think it is not worth the effort to make the switch to OSX. You can do it and use bootcamp for your existing software without too much difficulty. But, is it worth all the effort? It is not a terrible OS, but, honestly, nothing to write home about. It has its good points, such as the multifinger scrolling but it has its issues as well.
     
  4. Jarhead

    Jarhead 恋の♡アカサタナ

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    The biggest question is: Are you comfortable with the OS?

    While most stuff done today is OS agnostic, you seem pretty dug into Windows as Bronsky pointed out. With that said, OSX will definitely be able to handle what you want from it (assuming you buy OSX versions of Office and Adobe). However, I'd suggest that you play around with OSX for some period of time before considering buying an Apple computer; maybe you have a friend that's willing to lend you their computer for an extended time? Try doing your work and play on OSX first for a few hours, see what you think about the difference OS paradigms. Another option would be to install OSX on one of your current computer (Hackintosh), in case you cannot find a loaner OSX machine.

    Typically, I recommend that Windows-entrenched users stay in Windows, OSX-entrenched users stay with OSX, etc.
     
  5. aspectratio1

    aspectratio1 Notebook Enthusiast

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    The only reason I am considering MAC OS is:
    Many friends/colleagues have rated mac os
    Majority of IT experts I have met use mac os
    As i look after my company's IT infastructure and many friends pc's also. I do spend a lot of time fixing problems and majority of the time I wipe windows and do a fresh install. Apparently with mac os this doesn't happen.
    Also I have met people with old macs and they seem to work well even now beating some new windows pc performance.

    If I was to get a mac I would have to buy new software licences for MS Office. Apparently I might be able to ask adobe to exchange windows licence for a mac one.
     
  6. Jarhead

    Jarhead 恋の♡アカサタナ

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    That, my friend, is a misconception. Anyone can muck up their computers, regardless of OS. Conversely to your post, I can say with confidence that my friends never have issues with Windows, and ones with OSX are typically lost with trying to find things on the computer (back when I was in high school a year and a half ago, we had an iMac lab. Everyone just ended up BootCamping into Windows). And I own an eMachines T6412 desktop with XP that my family bought in 2005 and that still works just as well as when it was new.

    Computer performance is directly proportional to how much time a user is willing to perform maintenance; similar to how you can have a Chrysler running strong for many years with a driver that maintains it vs. a Honda Civic that breaks down after two or three years because the user has no concept of an oil change, tire rotation, filters, etc.

    I don't know why your friends use OSX, but IT is pretty OS agnostic as far as I see, so they can easily use Windows or Linux if wanted. I don't know the details about Adobe and exchanging licenses, but I see no point in switching if all you're doing is Adobe/Office, especially if you end up having to pay for a new copy of Office for Mac.

    If you want a long-lasting laptop (physically-speaking), you need to be looking at business-class laptops (Dell Latitude/Precision, Lenovo Thinkpad X/T/W, HP Probook/Elitebook) instead of consumer laptops (ranging from the cheap-o stuff you see in BestBuy/Walmart, to Apple, to Clevo-based laptops). You can look around in the respective business laptop forums here and see users still using old HP Compaq nx-series systems, Thinkpad Txx systems, or Latitude D630s and such.

    Whatever laptop you buy, so long as you take care of it, it'll last you. You can't just look at brand and determine quality for solely that; you must factor in how well you physically treat the laptop, and what sort of maintenance you're willing to perform (either Windows or OSX).
     
  7. KCETech1

    KCETech1 Notebook Prophet

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    OSX on its own tends to not like many linux file servers and has SMB dropout . Drobo etc have nightmares in the forums over it, you can spend hours doing workarounds in some cases.

    Adobe CS now favors windows 7 & 8

    If your a power user reinstalling OSX is not an uncommon experience

    as for speed, stability and other recommendations Jarhead said it very well
     
  8. KernalPanic

    KernalPanic White Knight

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    Using macOS or windows at home is mostly a matter of personal preference.

    Using macOS at work really is a matter of support. If your IT team doesn't have the resources to learn macOS, then YOU are your own support. I recommend asking your IT department about their support policy for macOS.

    For instance, if the Linux file server works fine for all Windows and *nix machines, your IT team is likely going to conclude that it is your macOS that is misconfigured thus YOU are going to get to fix it.

    I severely disagree about most IT experts using macOS. Almost all of our department uses Windows or *nix. Other than me, no one will touch a mac to save their life. This has been the same story for every IT department I have ever worked for for the past 17 years.

    As for performance, at least in web development apps, the PC and Mac are pretty much even as far as overall productivity of the users. It's more about what people are comfy with than anything else. The hardware is pretty much all the same now. (Apple tends to adopt technology faster than the mainstream PC manufacturers though.) The concept that an old mac outperforms a new PC is usually just Mac fanaticism.

    I suggest contacting your IT department at work and trying macOS yourself. The main reason to change is how comfy YOU are with the OS. For some people, macOS matches their brain's programming and thus everything is just so much easier. For others, macOS is an exercise in frustration. Don't take everyone else's word for it. There are just too many fanatics on both sides. :)
     
  9. Karamazovmm

    Karamazovmm Overthinking? Always!

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    best advice. IT dept arent OS agnostics, they are by far prevalent to *nix flavors and to support the end user which in 99% of the cases would be using windows. In my last job I was my support, and the support for the rest of the folks that used OSX machines in there. Mainly because our technician was an ****, he used OSX extensively (he owned a mb and mba) still couldnt for the life of his son do something to help us
     
  10. MattLangley

    MattLangley Notebook Enthusiast

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    With all the great windows ultrabooks out now of varying prices, designs, and even offering features superior to the macbook air I really see no reason why anyone would get an air unless they are firmly entrenched in Mac OS X.
     
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