Modding the $600.00 Inspiron 5402

Discussion in 'Dell' started by Not-meee, Nov 30, 2020.

  1. Not-meee

    Not-meee Notebook Geek

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    Ok, if you are an AMD fan boy please keep your mouth shut

    Here is the major list of what I ordered.
    The parts that are with an * are to be replaced with the items within ( ).

    Inspiron 14 5000 Series ( 5402 )
    Dell Cinema Color ( 74% effective colour reproduction )
    Silver Palmrest With Fingerprint Reader
    Stereo speakers professionally tuned with Waves MaxxAudio(R) Pro
    English Palmrest
    System driver for Windows
    Wireless Driver for 9462/AX201
    65 Watt AC Adapter
    Silver Backlit Keyboard
    4-Cell Battery, 53WHr
    Intel(R) Wi-Fi 6 2x2 (Gig+) and Bluetooth 5.1 (2.4gbps wifi)
    14" FHD (1920 x 1080) Anti-glare LED Backlight WVA Display (300nits)
    *512GB M.2 PCIe NVMe SSD ( Option - Samsung 970 EVO Plus 512GB & 980 Pro 512GB )
    *8GB, 1x8GB, DDR4, 3200MHz ( Option - 2x8GB DDR4-3200 )
    Intel(R) Iris(R) Xe Graphics with shared graphics memory ( Allocate up to 16GB )
    Windows 10 Home (64bit) English
    11th Generation Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-1135G7 Processor (8MB Cache, up to 4.2 GHz)
    3x N.2 PCI-E 3.0 ( 2 slots will accept either 2230 or 2280 card lengths )

    2x USB 3.2
    HDMI 1.4a
    USB 3.0 compatibility through Thunderbolt 3 USB-C
    The Samsung 980 Pro 500 SSD card was a Monday sale item on Amazon, $120.00.
    The Samsung 970 EVO Plus 500 SSD card was purchased on Samsung store.

    NOTE: I had searched high and low for various specs, about half are in the service pdf, for this laptop. The other bits are from other manufacturers that have designs based around the platform, and are within the same price structure. I will temporarily add another 8GB stick to allow dual port ram configuration to kick in. Dell has screwed the pooch by only a single 4GB, and or 8GB in the build configs. Which limits ram to be single port. Also it seems the second M.2 port is best for cooling. I will test speeds of the 980 Pro on both ports. Seeing if heat makes a difference. Dell specifically states Intel Optane card must go in the second M.2 port. Assuming space tollarance, in fitment or by lack of cooling, at the first M.2 port, which seems cramped. Won't know until my laptop is delivered.

    All else everything beats the AMD Ryzen 5 & 7 optioned 5000 series, even if the two items I am replacing are swapped into it. Plus the AMD mobile options for the start of the year only address up to 32GB. While 11th Generation Intel i5 and i7 address up to 64GB. So if you do video editing 64 GB with 16GB allocated to Intel video through shared memory is impossible for AMD. I see no budget friendly AMD laptop worth owning when Intel takes the cake.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2020
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  2. kojack

    kojack Notebook Virtuoso

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    I have it's older 2 in 1 brother. It's an awesome notebook. I put a kingston 1tb ssd in mine with 16gb of ballistix ram. I am going with 64gb of ram soon however, for video editing work. I love the 5000 series computers from dell because they give a great compromise of performance to cost. I am sure you will enjoy yours.
     
  3. Not-meee

    Not-meee Notebook Geek

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    Thanks! Glad you like your older 2in1. My main concern or reason to post this thread is on the lack of tech info on this particular model. In some ways many manufacturers making tiger lake products are hiding away important features that make the budget friendly laptop as good, if not better, than laptops twice their cost. Gone are the days of customizing a new build with Dell ordering. Some of the cost could have been greatly lowered, if dell would have allowed a minimum order of 256GB SSD, and two 4GB ram modules. Right now I pushed my $600 new laptop into the $750 price range. Which some will say I could have found something better. Honestly I would have to modify the build anyway because manufacturers will limit some areas to lower end performance. So far only a small handful of reviewers have dug down into the Tiger Lake chipsets, in truly showing their potential. Mostly because Intel is a head of the game, when you go with all Intel components. The India version was first to offer Nvidia discrete video option. Which a lot have chosen, because they like gaming. Unfortunately it sucks power and barely is a match in gaming respect to the newer Intel chipsets. Next year check out the new 2in1, and compare... Intel has upped the game on speed, light wieght, and gaming performance to rival AMD. The main reason why I chose to keep with Intel, is because Netflix, and PCI-E 4.0, and the fact that AMD chipsets does not make good for laptops. Haven't found an AMD laptop I am happy with since 2000. Probably never will. In all honesty at the time of ordering, the Intel option covered a lot of wee areas that did not need touched. Example, wifi 6, which until now was given to some AMD optioned 5000 series builds. I noticed as of recent some now have that option. But as shown in my updated list of features and tech details, you can now see much more clearly how Tiger Lake beats the AMD optioned mid range offerings.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2020
  4. Not-meee

    Not-meee Notebook Geek

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    As an added note... I see many manufacturers that offer a choice between AMD and Intel, use the same information in limited details, unless there is key differences with video spec and CPU. Being lazy not to be specific, as to what you actually get. Plus technical write up may specify a standard that is more compatible for upgrades, for the time of writing. Example no LDDR4X-4266 SODIMM existed on the market, so why bring up any compatibility? Another point is the chipsets used may not have had data sheets at the time of the write up. Setting a particular standard to guarantee without knowing of any hardware revision requirements. I have seen many devices state one thing and end up being more capable than what was stated. So if you think I am dreaming, well I may be wrong on some accounts, but years of knowing better, there is a good reason not to take the basic details and some technical details in the service documents as facts.

    I dug deeper into Thunderbolt and because of the dual 4K display spec, the Intel chipset should be Thunderbolt 4. While AMD uses Thunderbolt 3, mostly because Intel issued it as royalty free. So chalk one more up on manufacturers hiding details, proving AMD is paying big money now to push their old tech as better than Intel's improved new tech. I will update my specs to reflect what should be seen in the systems configuration by using Windows based hardware inspection tools.

    So far, the hidden specs that beat AMD, on Tiger Lake mid range systems are as follows.

    PCI-E 4.0
    Thinderbolt 4
    USB 4.0 compatibility
    64 GB max memory
    16GB max video memory

    Both AMD and Intel use LDDR4X-4266 Ram. That is the only hidden feature shared between them.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2020
  5. kojack

    kojack Notebook Virtuoso

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    I take ALL claims using synthetic benchmarks and manufacturers with a massive grain of salt. I have used machines that, on synthetic benchmarks cleaned clocks, be absolute garbage in the real world and vice versa.
     
  6. Not-meee

    Not-meee Notebook Geek

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    Yep, it's just bragging rights. Most numbers are hardly noticable in some cases, in figuring differences. It's all about implementation of your hardware. AMD has too many bottle necks on mid level systems. Intel standards are tight knit with chipsets. AMD has always allowed cross compatibility. Hard not to when Intel has so much tied within their chipsets. Back in the early 90s years, I would blow away system builders with stuff they never seen. The first dual GPU graphics adapter, Nakamichi 6 CD changer, and NT4.0 on a raid0 for my home built system that ran on 50Mhz bus. While Pentiums ran at 33. The killer CPU at the time was called a NexGen. It was head to head against Cirex and Intel, the only difference is that it did not have the floating point subsystem of the Intel chip. IBM ended up buying NexGen. The last NexGen I saw was in mid 90 in the last of the PS model line. It had a blue glass Diamond over the center. Out side of the Rare P90 (Intel was destroying them after exchange) with bad co-processor floating point system. It may be a sought after collectors item for hardware geeks like my old 90's Diamond dual Wytek GPU graphics card, it was before ATI had made their first gamers card.
     
  7. kojack

    kojack Notebook Virtuoso

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    Now you're speaking my language. the golden age of PC modding!
     
  8. Not-meee

    Not-meee Notebook Geek

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    Ha, the first ever mod I did was for a defence contracted part of TRW, in 86. I installed a math co-processor on a 286 system. It had a cemented heat sink and it's own clock driver. The first removable hard drive I came across was with Ford Aero Space. While installing an Intel above board. What it does is makes an old system newer. In this case converting a 286 system into a 386 by popping in a card into the bus. The engineer had slammed in a hard disk, that used a 32 pin D shell connector for SCSI mounted on a custom board. There was no offerings like that on consumer level. Though the Richo removable (a mini Bernoulli) 10MB disk was portable, and could be made into a 20MB disk by using an RLL interface when formating.

    Life was good back then, seen some interesting setups and was a hot shot installer. Always dealing with latest and greatest before general public. I think the coolest setup in 86 was a Wyse Paper White display. It had its own priority video card. The test image was a white Tiger head in black back ground. The hairs were well defind. The best display ever for its time. Soon came out was the Mac pro which killed all Intel based video offerings. Though Omiga was soon after. Talk about macintosh. I got tired with them buggers. Always having to clean the contacts from installers finger prints. Loved installing the Big Picture. It made the wee 10" screen into 30 inches, using a piggy back socket on the main board. You had to fish the external display connection through the security door on the back side.
     
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  9. kojack

    kojack Notebook Virtuoso

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    I could never get into mac. My friend had one back in around 1992, I think it was a quadra tower, The only cool thing it did was the voice output. Type something and it will read it back to you. I am sure my PC at the time could have software at the time to do the same thing, but Hey....I had sk8 or die, so that beat the silly talking computer.
     
  10. kojack

    kojack Notebook Virtuoso

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    Oh, Keep us informed on how that new "cheapy" dell is rocking too!
     
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