Mobile Pascal TDP Tweaker Update and Feedback Thread

Discussion in 'Gaming (Software and Graphics Cards)' started by Coolane, Jun 20, 2017.

  1. Rinkutux

    Rinkutux Notebook Enthusiast

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  2. seanwee

    seanwee Notebook Deity

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  3. Rinkutux

    Rinkutux Notebook Enthusiast

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  4. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    I would solder 15 mOhm or 20 mOhm ones on top. Although personally, you're working on a laptop so I would want this to be reversible easily without something going wrong.
    You can also alternatively, just use MG Chemicals Silver conductive paint, which works like a ~15 mOhm shunt. You have TWO ways to use the conductive paint: (and use a toothpick with it).

    1) to "attach" the new shunt on top of the original (I would use a 15 or 20 mOhm shunt). For this you want as little paint as possible AND ideally, you want the original shunt's edges to be completely flush with the center. This makes stacking work well without soldering. Just apply a VERY small amount of the silver paint to the edges of each shunt, spread it around, then stack the new shunt on top. Then let it dry 15 minutes. Check that it's secured after it dries. If it's secured, follow up with a little liquid electrical tape (easily removeable with alcohol).

    2) If the original shunt has 'depressed' edges that are lower than the middle black part, it's best just to paint the entire original shunt, rather than trying to stack, due to the extra gap that would make you use more paint to bridge the gap. In this case, you're best off painting the entire original shunt and bridging the two edges completely, only with paint, and not stacking at all.

    Just make sure you 'scrape' the edges of the shunts (the silver part) with a small flat bladed screwdriver first, to remove any conformal coating--you want as little resistance as possible. Then use the paint I listed and a toothpick and make sure the edges of the new shunts contact the edges of the originals.
    Some shunts are completely flat. Some have the edges slightly lower than the middle. You may have a slight resistance increase from that (maybe ~10 mOhms) if the original shunts are not fully flat.

    This is what I did on my RTX 3090.

    https://www.amazon.com/MG-Chemicals-Silver-Print-Conductive/dp/B01MCXW1Y1/

    And a toothpick. And some liquid electrical tape if stacking.

    Don't listen to the "YOU MUST solder or you are a homeless bum worthless beginner not worthy of overclocking" crowd. This method works fine and has been tested by two people.
     
    klGE66, Papusan, seanwee and 2 others like this.
  5. Rinkutux

    Rinkutux Notebook Enthusiast

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    That's very interesting. I'd avoid soldering if I can since my solder skills aren't very on point. Does this method also work with liquid metal ? I have some at home right now. I also have a silver conductive pen, would drawing a stripe between each sides of the shunt work ? Otherwise I'll try to get silver conductive paint.
    Few questions :
    On the first method, when you say "spread it around", do you mean covering the whole shunt ?
    On the second, painting the entire original shunt means painting only the black part ? And then joining each side with paint ?

    Also, do you have a link for a good 15 or 20 mOhm shunt that would work ?

    Thank you !

    Edit : Seems the silver paint you linked is only available in US and won't ship in Eu. Do you have some alternative ? I can't find any sadly
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2020
  6. seanwee

    seanwee Notebook Deity

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    First time I've heard of this method, thanks for sharing.
     
  7. Rinkutux

    Rinkutux Notebook Enthusiast

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    Alright I wanted to look closely to the shunts but in the end it doesn't seem to be "silver" edges for contact. New pics joined. So where are the contacts to solder/paint another shunt on top of them ? Should I solder/paint it from the base ?
     

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    Last edited: Nov 11, 2020
  8. senso

    senso Notebook Deity

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    Liquid metal alloys with the solder and makes it very brittle and soldering anything back again will be a PITA, dont use liquid metal on the shunts unless for a quick bench run...

    You need to use some pieces of cooper, or just replace those shunts with new lower value resistors.
     
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  9. Rinkutux

    Rinkutux Notebook Enthusiast

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  10. senso

    senso Notebook Deity

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    Its a rotated footprint, so only the susumu ones are the correct footprint, the Yageo one is the regular footprint and wont work on your laptop.
     
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