Minimum Haswell CPU clockspeed for 3k 60fps gaming

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Arthedes, May 18, 2015.

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Whats your Haswell CPU clockspeed in GHz for gaming?

  1. higher? please consider posting below.

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. 4.3-4.5

    10.0%
  3. 4.0-4.2

    10.0%
  4. 3.9-4.0

    25.0%
  5. 3.7-3.8

    10.0%
  6. 3.5-3.6

    20.0%
  7. 3.3-3.4

    20.0%
  8. 3.0-3.2

    15.0%
  9. 2.5-3.0

    15.0%
  10. lower? please consider posting below.

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
Multiple votes are allowed.
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  1. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOK's Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

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    LoL... Yes its cold home but not -40C... My wife love to have fire in the fireplace home so it's hot anyway :( we don't need aircondition home if you understand. I run normally my 4930mx ok 24/7 on 4.3ghz so I haven't tested with higher clock speed. I run more Wprime 1024 and Cinebench benchmark tests because I like the test run a longer time and compare with Hq processors :p... You know this is not a BGA processor with turbo boost that can run only 28 sec before the clock speed go down. I have tested only with 4.3 and get a score 5.351 in Wprime 32 and 167.560 in Wprime 1024. Many laptop processors(also bga crap) can run with an o.k Score in short benchmark test but not if the test go over a longer time.

    @Dufus have you noticed that many of the i7-4940mx processors have more problems with an ok overclock than :Dlder 4930mx ? I and Mr Fox think maybe they are poorer binned. What is your conclusion on that?
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2015
  2. Meaker@Sager

    Meaker@Sager Company Representative

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    High CPU clock speeds are needed for high refresh rate gaming rather than high resolution gaming. For 60 fps 3ghz should do fine.
     
    TomJGX likes this.
  3. karasahin

    karasahin Notebook Consultant

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    I don't see why it is so funny to you, it is not a BGA after all...
     
  4. Arthedes

    Arthedes Notebook Evangelist

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    Would the CPU run at a lower clock speed if it is not needed? For example, in game A you would get 40 fps with 3.5 ghz and also 40 fps when clocked at 2.5 ghz, would it run at 2.5 ghz all the time or stay at 3.5 ghz?

    I havent noticed this really.

    EDIT: I just ran AC:U in a busy area on 3k and I get 35 fps with either 3.0ghz and 3.4 ghz on 4 cores. This indicates that in this case the GPU is bottlenecking the situation. However, I find it strange that the CPU would run at a higher clock speed and a higher temperature when the framerate would stay the same. With 3.0ghz the cpu hits 85C and with 3.4ghz the CPU hits the thermal cap of 95C.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2015
  5. Arthedes

    Arthedes Notebook Evangelist

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    I thought CPU bottleneck only occurs when one or more cores is 100% loaded. However, in Borderlands 2, when running at 2.6GHz I get less FPS than when running at 3.4 GHZ (even though at 3.4 it will start thermal throttling after a few minutes), even when the cores are not fully loaded (I know this because I run msi afterburner, showing the load of all my 8 individual cores, and not one of them is at 100%, more like 40%)

    How do you know your cpu is bottlenecking or not?
     
  6. octiceps

    octiceps Nimrod

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    Turn off Hyper-Threading then check load
     
  7. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOK's Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

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    It's not possible to compare pitiful Bga processors that throttle in thin laptops and socket processors. No Bga processors = No thin laptops with pitiful cooling:D. With a bios that is functioning properly so is a i7-47xxmq processor the best choice anyway. I do not bully socketed processors (the best choice). There are only Hq aka BGA processors who is known as garbage... See what is written in my my Custom Title under my Avtar.
     
  8. Arthedes

    Arthedes Notebook Evangelist

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    Why?
     
  9. D2 Ultima

    D2 Ultima Livestreaming Master

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    No, it'd likely clock up quite a bit more. It usually clocks up more than necessary, probably to compensate for CPU load spikes.

    Higher clockspeeds (and voltage) automatically mean higher temperatures™ even if the load is the same (not 50% CPU vs 50% CPU, but 50% CPU at 1.5GHz and 25% CPU at 3GHz, etc). If you are worried about temps and you find that game X is GPU-bottlenecked™ then you might as well lower the clockspeed via Throttlestop or something.

    No, this is not the case. Bottlenecking can be a real annoying thing to discover, and regardless of what JayZTwoCents™ says, is present almost all the time, in some form or other. It USUALLY is a GPU bottleneck of sorts, but even with an absolute GPU bottleneck, raising CPU speed can still sometimes improve FPS. CPU bottlenecking however can be hard to determine, for various reasons. Here's some ways in which you might be seeing "extra" power available, but overclocking/underclocking greatly affects the game still:
    1 - Games don't like to use "100%" of a single core when hyperthreading is enabled. This usually tops out at ~95% if it's heavily stressed, but to your eyes, more power is available.
    2 - Games sometimes are designed for x# of cores. If they see more, they can split the load, and your CPU will appear to be quite un-stressed, but it's actually using all that it is coded to use, and thus clockspeed bumps get a nice boost to FPS.
    3 - Windows 8. Some games or programs have a distinct limit of the CPU power they're allowed to use. Windows 8 has screwed up by making "100% CPU" mean somewhere between 75% and 80% CPU. For example: HERE is me rendering with Vegas at Win 8's 100% CPU. And HERE is me using TS8's benchmark, which actually uses 100% CPU. So sometimes Windows 8'll think it's at 100% and a game will stop using the CPU or something, even though there's much more power available. HOPEFULLY Windows 10 fixes that, or you can use Windows 7 if you aren't interested in the benefits that Win 8 or Win 10 bring.
    4 - Games might just be single-thread heavy. Mass Effect 3 kind of pissed me off like that. I had set it to lock to 125fps and it had trouble maintaining that because 3.5GHz on a single core with all the graphics goodies I turned on via NVI wasn't fast enough (see previous statement about 4.3GHz or faster CPU being wanted by me =D). This one however, should be pretty easy to tell.
    5 - Games could be made by Bohemia Interactive, and for some reason have a minimal load on both CPU and GPU and still run like a sloth with broken legs. For reasons yet unknown, overclocking seems to work.

    With hyperthreading off, as I touched on earlier, you can see the full, proper load that the game is placing on your CPU. The hyperthread cores are extra CPU performance, yes, but with them active, loads will never look like they hit 100%. Except for Final Fantasy XIII that game somehow manages to hit 99% on a single core and 0% on the hyperthread.
     
  10. octiceps

    octiceps Nimrod

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    Because unless a game utilizes multi-threading effectively (hint: not UE3 DX9 games like BL2 which are basically single-threaded), you are CPU-bound at 50% load on a Hyper-Threaded CPU. That's why you don't see a single thread getting maxed out even though you are clearly CPU-bound. Disable Hyper-Threading and you'll get a real picture of your CPU utilization.
     
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