Maingear Vector 2 i7 10750H, RTX 2060 Max-P, 16 GB RAM, 1 TB SSD - $999 @ MicroCenter

Discussion in 'Notebook and Tech Bargains' started by saturnotaku, Dec 4, 2020.

  1. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Product Link

    It's a Tongfang chassis, so the keyboard layout and webcam placement are, IMO, less than ideal, but you'll be hard pressed to find a better deal on a laptop with a standard 1 TB SSD and a full-power RTX 2060. I believe this model also has NVIDIA Advanced Optimus.
     
  2. Raidriar

    Raidriar ლ(ಠ益ಠლ)

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    Wrong thread oops
     
  3. alexhawker

    alexhawker Spent Gladiator

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    Aluminum isn't even that great of a material for this use, Apple has just caused so many people to fetishize it. In the land of metals, aluminum is soft (I know someone who calls it "shiny wood") - you can scratch it with a fingernail.
     
  4. Raidriar

    Raidriar ლ(ಠ益ಠლ)

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    I disagree. Aluminum, for me at least, is a premium material and I love it. Nothing irritates me more than hearing creaking plastic when picking up a plastic laptop or pressing down own a plastic palm rest. Aluminum doubles as a heatsink too, so you can stack some thermal pads on NVME SSD, PCH, MOSFETs, etc to whisk away the heat from those components.
     
  5. alexhawker

    alexhawker Spent Gladiator

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    I agree, aluminum performs better than plastic, but it's hardly the "best" choice. A magnesium alloy frame is stiffer and lighter, and the body panels can be whatever you like, carbon fiber, aluminum etc. CNCing from large chunks of aluminum is a very expensive manufacturing process, as are the finishing processes required (acid dips, glass bead blasting, clear anodizing). Using a stronger frame lets you start with thinner sheets to produce body panels, which is cheaper and more efficient, and allows you to use other materials as well.

    People perceive CNC machined aluminum as the only/best premium option because they've been trained to believe that, and have been charged premium prices for it.
     
    huntnyc, Aivxtla and saturnotaku like this.

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