Mac Pro with $400 wheels maxed out = $52,599

Discussion in 'Apple and Mac OS X' started by hmscott, Dec 11, 2019.

  1. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Apple could turn that around on a dime. And, take the #1 spot, and could have for years - it's not easy, but it's possible.

    Now that the iphone is in "maintanence mode, hopefully Apple will kick MacOS back into gear and deliver affordable USEFUL hardware that performs up to the potential of the parts they use.

    Picking Intel for the Mac Pro was a big mistake - again Apple takes far too long to decide, and by then the meat of the moment turns bad - 6 years ago Apple could have rode Intel high for at least 3 years and made a market that could cost through the storms Intel is suffering. But, now to premiere Intel right when AMD is ascending and Intel is plunging, Apple may have got a loser once again - at least it's not as bad as the Trashcan Mac, hopefully, sigh.

    Apple needs to build alternate boards for AMD ThreadRipper into that frame and take a turn for the better.
     
  2. kojack

    kojack Notebook Virtuoso

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    No, they can't. Apple knows this, that's why its unicorn farts and rainbows. People who actually know about computers won't buy a mac to save their lives, and the minions don't care about performance as long as its ridiculously overpriced and and running crapOS.

    Case in point is comparing my 579 dollar dell insprion to my sons 1599 dollar macbook air. his is a 2015 and mines a 2016. My dell out performs his macbook, has a better screen, is a 2 in 1 with touchscreen, 1tb drive instead of 128, i have 16gb of ram compared to his 4gb. he has 2 hours better battery life. If I mishandle my dell, it wont dent or scratch. his is peppered with little dents from lugging it around campus, mine has been to camp sites, playgrounds parks and hotels, as well as airports ferries and more and it looks brand new.
     
  3. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Yeah, I know and I say otherwise, so there. :)

    Apple's still got an OS and hardware development that can do the right thing and deliver good hardware - and by good I mean useful and able to not thermal throttle and compete with Windows PC's - running MacOS - it's gonna take some work and some time but I think they can do it.

    Don't sell Apple short. Apple's been distracted by the cash cow's of the iPod, iPhone, iPad - etc, but at some point Apple's going to realize that's not enough.

    I'm excited to see what Apple delivers long term...

    I've seen people talk like you about how it's too late for Apple for 30 years, and Apple's MacOS still isn't dead. :)

    All Apple needs to do is decide to be price competitive - and AMD can help with that for Apple MacOS the same as with Windows / Linux.
     
  4. kojack

    kojack Notebook Virtuoso

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    Apple realizes that ipod/phone/pad are not enough, but they are not going to use mac, they are using services. MacOS still isn't dead, but it's still not growing after 30 years either. Its just......there. Like linux. Neither will challenge windows for top spot. As for Apple competing with Windows based PCs, that will happen when Apple prices their devices to a comparable Windows based pc. Until then, which will be never because they know they can charge their minions WAY more than their Windows based competition, the Mac will always hover right where it's to now.
     
  5. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    It's got Pop!_OS (Debian -> Ubuntu -> Pop!_OS derived Linux) in there too :)

    We Ditched Mac Pro for THIS...[Pop!_OS]
    Jan 20, 2020
    Snazzy Labs
    The 2019 Mac Pro has been lauded by many as the end-all-be-all of video editing workstations. But that's only if you have big $$$. We put Linux on our AMD Ryzen 3950X PC and see how it holds up. Many tech YouTubers use Final Cut Pro X and Adobe Premiere Pro to edit their videos, but Derek, the cinematographer here at Snazzy Labs uses Blackmagic Davinci Resolve. Unlike the other two popular NLEs, Resolve is available for Mac, Windows, and Linux but was originally developed for Linux to use in a professional studio/post-processing environment. We took our PC rocking a 3950X CPU, a GTX 1080 (ya, we know, we're waiting on the new 2080 Ti Super), and put this thing to the test. Not only does it run Linux, but it does so very well. Running the Debian/Ubuntu-based Pop!_OS, this thing is ready to rumble.


    Pop_OS! 19.04 vs Ubuntu 19.04: what are the differences ?
    May 22, 2019
    The Linux Experiment
    Pop_OS!, System 76's own Linux distro, has gained quite a lot of attention lately. One question that comes back often is: how does it compare with Ubuntu, on which it's based ? Let's take a look at the differences between the two !
    Installation
    Ubuntu still rocks its Ubiquity installer. It offers a few options, such as partitioning the drive, enabling encryption, turning the wifi on wifi to download and install updates right during the installation, as well as installing proprietary, non-free software such as codecs, or even the stable nvidia drivers best suited to your hardware.
    PopOS installer is a whole new one. developed in conjunction with the elementary OS team. The Live ISO of Pop OS boots directly on the installer, but you can of course still use the system through GNOME. Pop_OS asks you for the language, the keyboard layout, and then offers a few options to either erase the whole disk and install PopOS, or to tweak the partition layout. Partitioning is actually done through Gparted, while Ubuntu's installer has its own integrated tool. Once you selected the disk you want to install on, you'll get the choice to encrypt the drive, with encryption being made default.
    User account creation is handled after the machine reboots.
    Another main difference is that Pop_OS ships 2 ISOs: one for Intel and AMD cards, and another for Nvidia cards, which includes the latest nvidia drivers by default, so you have on less step to enable them after install.
    Also interesting to note is the fact that Pop_OS will create a recovery partition, allowing you to reinstall, or simply refresh your existing install, while keeping all your user files. This is a great feature I wish other distros would incorporate.
    Look and feel
    Pop_OS and Ubuntu look very different, although both use GNOME. with a more yellowish tint, charcoal title bars While Ubuntu adds a dock by default, Pop_OS does not, opting for a purer GNOME experience. Both extensively theme the desktop, with Ubuntu using its nice Yaru theme and Suru icons, with orange highlights and black elements, and POP_OS using its own theme with a yellowish accent color, and charcoal title bars. Pop_OS also uses very vivid icons, with a cyan blue for the folders, and other icons being closer to what GNOME 3.32 offers.
    Pop_OS also adds the ability to use a slim mode, to shrink title bars a bit, and enable a dark mode by default, which can offset the very bright colors and make it a bit less tiring for your eyes.
    Software
    Pop_OS ships with Firefox as its web browser, just like Ubuntu, but replaces thunderbird with Geary, a lighter, simpler email client that fits a lot more nicely with a GNOME desktop. It includes LibreOffice, as well as most of the GNOME default apps: calendar, terminal, settings, document viewer, image viewer,etc...
    Ubuntu ships with a bit more stuff than Pop_OS, though, such as Cheese, a few games like Mines, Mahjoingg or Solitaire,
    or rhythmbox.
    As a result, pop_OS is a bit lighter after installation than Ubuntu, using 7gb of hard drive space, while Ubuntu uses 9GB
    App Stores
    Here is a big difference between distros: Ubuntu uses the GNOME Software application, which is the standard on a lot of distros. It handles app installations, but not libraries. It can open individual .deb packages though, and handle their installation.
    Pop_OS ships with the Pop Shop, which is based on elementary OS's AppCenter. While it does not include the elementary apps, unfortunately, it still retains the same general look and feel and organization.
    Neither distros ship with flatpak support enabled, but both support PPAs. Ubuntu does ship with snap support enabled while Pop_OS does not.
    Since the PopShop does not handle deb packages, Pop_OS ships with Eddy, a simple elementary OS application, to handle these kind of files.
    Repositories
    App selection is pretty much the same here, since Pop_OS's repos are based on Ubuntu's. Pop_OS enables all of Ubuntu's repos by default.
    It also adds its own repositories, in the form of an apt proprietary repo, including steam, Spotify, or VSCode, and a PPA.
    Ubuntu, while it does enable the same repos by default, has its own way of shipping additional software, namely through the snap store, included directly in GNOME Software. You'll find a bunch of applications there that aren't in Pop_OS's repos, such as Plex, OBS, discord, or Zenkit.
    Performance
    In terms of measured performance, Ubuntu did use up a bunch more RAM by default, probably because of its larger application suite, using 2.3 GB of my 16GB of RAM.
    Pop OS used a little less than 2GB when idle, but it did seem more fluid when interacting with GNOME shell, especially under load.
    Animations felt faster and more responsive, and opening apps also seemed snappier.
    It light be because PopOS ships with less stuff installed, but the experience felt smoother.


    In defense of the $1000 monitor stand, a "performance" piece...

    Apple Fanboy Defends $1,000 Monitor Stand
    Jan 11, 2020
    Snazzy Labs
    You guys just don't get it. This thing transcends function. It's art. No, it's more than that... Apple released its $5,000 ProDisplay XDR in December 2019 bragging about its capabilities compared to reference monitors used in Hollywood coloring houses that go for well over $50,000. While many remained skeptical, most praised the monitor as a heck of a deal. What didn't do so well, however, was the $1,000 Pro Stand for ProDisplay XDR. So... is it really worth $1,000? This parody character sure seems to think so... Joking aside, it's honestly not a very good monitor stand and we'll talk about why in our final review of the ProDisplay XDR coming soon.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2020
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  6. kojack

    kojack Notebook Virtuoso

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    Wow, half way through that first video I had to stop. The apple fanboy juices were flowing big time in the constant ripping on windows. LOVE IT.
     
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  7. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    I'm certainly not gonna suggest a Hackintosh is a good reliable work tool - if you want to run Mac OS buy a Macintosh made by Apple, pay the man!

    If you don't mind the whole package of disappointment possible, then Snazzy has a good review of what it takes to configure one with compatible hardware - pre-built in this case.

    Make a Mac Pro for Under $2,000!
    Jan 24, 2020
    Snazzy Labs
    Snazzy Labs shows the latest all-AMD Corsair Vengeance 6182 Gaming PC running macOS Catalina using OpenCore. You can make your own too!
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2020
  8. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    It's becoming a thing now, making Mac Pro's Better than Apple, cheaper too.

    Don't give Apple your MONEY - Mac Pro Upgrade Adventure
    Linus Tech Tips
    The Mac Pro is an EXPENSIVE computer, but you don’t have to pay the Apple Tax to get the power you need – Follow along with us and save some money by upgrading it yourself!
     
  9. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Another better than Mac Pro build comparison, this time using AMD Ryzen ThreadRipper 3790x:

    $15,000 Mac Pro vs $5,000 Threadripper - Sorry Apple..
    Feb 7, 2020
    Max Tech
    Is it true that an AMD Threadripper PC Build can outperform the 2019 Mac Pro at a much lower price? Let's find out in this Ultimate Comparison!

     
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  10. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKs Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

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