M6800 Owners' Thread

Discussion in 'Dell Latitude, Vostro, and Precision' started by billxt95, Nov 1, 2013.

  1. Aaron44126

    Aaron44126 Notebook Virtuoso

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    Can't be "diagnosed" without details of the bluescreen error message. If you don't recall, download BlueScreenView which should be able to show you the history.
     
  2. CristiM1974

    CristiM1974 Newbie

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    For some reason I can't upload pictures here.
     
  3. derei

    derei Notebook Geek

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    Hy, is there any "modded" CPU Heatsink for M6800? Some version with improved heat spreading, or is just the "stock model" available to use?
    Cheers!
     
  4. D.Dastardly

    D.Dastardly Notebook Geek

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    Migrated from Windows 7, or fresh install? UEFI or legacy?

    There is a driver causing the errors, I get them once a week.
     
  5. rlk

    rlk Notebook Consultant

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    You may want to run memtest86; you'll need a small flash drive to burn it onto, because it runs as its own OS. That does a good job testing your memory. If you get any failures, first try reseating your DIMMs; if that doesn't work, take out all but one so you can run memtest86 against each DIMM in turn. That will help you identify whether you have a bad DIMM or something else is going on.
     
  6. KhronX

    KhronX Notebook Guru

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    I don't suppose disabling "automatic restart" so you can write down whatever error codes / culprits displayed, has been tried yet, has it?
    I would think that'd at least offer a (clearer) starting point (clearer than shooting in the dark with stuff like memtest86, anyway).
     
  7. rlk

    rlk Notebook Consultant

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    memtest86 is cheap (free except for the USB stick) and easy to try. And memory is easy and (relatively) cheap to replace.

    If memory is bad -- and my experience is that that's a particularly common failure point, in part since most other things are soldered in place and the CPU is clamped much more tightly in place (or soldered down, on Skylake+ systems, which doesn't apply here) -- it can masquerade as just about anything. If you're lucky, it will cause OS panics as is happening here; if you're unlucky, you might get silent data corruption. If it is causing panics, they may or may not be reproducible and may or may not be consistently the same failure point, depending upon whether particular memory cells are bad or if there's some other problem. Unless you have ECC memory, you won't get an explicit memory failure error.

    memtest86 is quite effective, if you allow it to run one or two full passes. It tries really, really hard to stress memory.

    My rule of thumb is that with any flaky errors the very first thing I try is memtest86.
     
  8. KhronX

    KhronX Notebook Guru

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    I'm not saying memtest86 isn't a useful tool, but if there's, say, one particular wonky driver that's the root-cause of those BSoD's, you can stress / test the memory until the cows come home, to no avail :)
     
  9. rlk

    rlk Notebook Consultant

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    That's true enough, but by the same token, a memory error could mimic a driver failure, if the error happens to be somewhere that the driver's always loaded. Running a full pass of memtest86 gives you a pretty good assurance of whether the problem's there or elsewhere.
     
  10. Aaron44126

    Aaron44126 Notebook Virtuoso

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    There is a tool called "Bluescreenview" which will let you see this information after-the-fact. It will show a log of the BSODs and highlight files with active code running when the BSOD occurred. If there is a similarity between them, you can track down what driver the file belongs to and you have your culprit.

    http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/blue_screen_view.html
     
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