M18x R1/R2 - Creative Use for the Empty Mini-PCI Slot (WIHD socket on systems without WIHD)

Discussion in 'Alienware 18 and M18x' started by Mr. Fox, Jan 11, 2013.

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  1. jlyons264

    jlyons264 Notebook Evangelist

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    soldered on cpus isn't something new. There has been very few computers that there was a user upgrade-able cou on the motherboard.

    edit: btw it isn't just laptops...

    Intel 'preparing' to put an end to user-replaceable CPUs | ZDNet

    http://www.extremetech.com/computin...end-of-socketed-cpus-the-end-of-upgradable-pc
     
  2. steviejones133

    steviejones133 Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Couldn't agree more with the above - post #102. It's certainly heading towards making user upgrades a thing of the past. Just another example of big business using it's muscle to make life harder for the end user, and cream off even more profit at every given opportunity. In a way, it is kind of like what Dell have done with this new 'tiered configuration' structure - sure, you can have 780m SLI, but in order to do so, you MUST have some of the crap we want to throw in on top of that so we make even more profit.
     
  3. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    Yeah, I've seen all that. I realize it's not new, but having no other option available would be something new. Should that happen, it would really suck.

    The silver lining is that it might help keep the value of used systems higher. I suspect Intel will still have an enthusiast option available. It might be limited to Extreme CPUs, but that would still be better than nothing. There is always the chance that such a foolish business decision would result in a loss of sales to enthusiasts and a public outcry against it, and they might ultimately rethink their approach if that happens. We have seen that happen with other things. The new XBOX is an example of an about-face on what was planned. The negative reception to their plans for big-brother control of things was severe and got Micro$oft's attention.

    I don't know that they're smart enough to even recognize it, but this kind of stupid move would represent an opportunity for AMD to steal some of Intel's business. Hopefully, they have some big shots that are intelligent enough to not follow Intel's lead on that nonsense.

    I am all for businesses making massive profits. Especially companies like Dell, Microsoft and Apple, which started off as home-run businesses and grew to behemoth enterprises. All are excellent examples of the way things ought to be. We have already seen bad examples of what happens when companies can't afford to spend money on R&D, strong incentive wages and delivery of excellent customer service. They start outsourcing and off-shoring, and offering fewer products. The more money they can make (and keep) the better. They become stronger, and that is better for their employees and customers (improving benefits, wages and job security, and employees that care about customers). They can only charge as much as the market will bear. Consumer financial restraints and competition is what keeps prices in check. Being profit-driven is a business virtue that is taking a bad rap in a messed up world that thinks having a Robin Hood government is acceptable. However, I am not in favor of anything that smacks of customer control, forced obsolescence, limited purchasing options, and consumer rip-offs (paying more for less). That is extremely anti-customer. In my view, moving to soldered CPUs is extremely anti-customer. It will probably lead to more garbage that can't be upgraded ending up in land fills, too.
     
  4. woodzstack

    woodzstack Alezka Computers , Official Clevo reseller.

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    not top talk against you, but based on volume of stuff made and wasted etc.. by making everything soldered on, they could simply only make what is being bhought in some cases/ i.e order it and wait for production, but also it wastes less product by having parts that are removable and such.. also things that get built to be the replacements usually end up somewhere too.. if we couldn't salvage parts here and there we'd probably not buy as many upgrades and waste less over all... but, we're the group of enthuisiasts that wish to do the crazy things to our pc, so obviously we're the smaller niche that wishes to keep things customizable..

    but ultimately, we are the ones causing more trash/larger heaps... we maybe keep the same motherboard longer, but we go through many more parts that more then compensate IMO...
     
  5. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    I'm thinking more in terms of disposable computers that are cheaper to replace than fix, or cannot be upgraded. A moderately priced laptop that is a year or two old, still in good condition and performs well enough, but needs a motherboard that costs way more than what it is worth because it includes a CPU is more likely to get round-filed. Even some of the more expensive garbage being cranked out and peddled under a guise of being something special (including some of the new MBP) have the CPU and memory soldered to the motherboard. This is a joke and it's shameful. I pity the poor suckers that buy that kind of junk and don't even realize it until it's too late. The manufacturers do not go out of their way to disclose unfavorable details like that. If they did, they probably wouldn't be able to sell their products to a fair number customers, enthusiast or otherwise.

    I think a lot of noobs would avoid buying a computer if it was clearly labeled "Service parts for this system are prohibitively costly. Internal components that are typically serviceable are not removable. As a result, component upgrades are physically impossible or not feasible." Sure, there would still be some ignorant folks or value shoppers that go for it and possibly regret it later. But, then they would have only their self to blame rather than the company that shafted them.
     
  6. woodzstack

    woodzstack Alezka Computers , Official Clevo reseller.

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    Valid points.

    Sorry I got this thread out of context to the mpci-e fun...

    Q: can the slot be bootable ?
    if so, what was bootable (seems others are interested/would value this information)

    Based on experience...

    Q: what cards/options were used to good effect ?
    Q: what sort of cards / options (like WiFi dongles) did not work well/performed poorly for whatever reason ?
     
  7. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    I could not get the internal slot to boot and to the best my knowledge nobody else was able to. It seems like power does not go to the DMC (mini-PCI) slot until POST completes, which could account for why it is not bootable. I never tested that with a power meter, so it is somewhat anecdotal. But, I tried more than once to boot multiple bootable USB devices without any success.

    I used the USB port with a micro USB flash drive. I tried using the Logitech unified micro receiver for my G700 and the radio connection was frequently dropped. Others have use a different USB micro-dongle for a wireless mouse without any problems reported. I tried using my Intel Ultimate-N 6300 in that slot and the card is recognized and drivers installed. It could see, but it refused to connect to any wireless network while installed in the DMC slot. Moving it back to the appropriate slot, it instantly connected to my default WiFi connection.

    I haven't tried other types of cards in that DMC slot.
     
  8. TBoneSan

    TBoneSan Laptop Fiend

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    I'm still pondering over what I can put into this slot. I really think the wireless mouse receiver is a good way to go but I can imagine drop outs would be frequent with my current budget wireless.
     
  9. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    Try it... I know others say they have used it with a wireless mouse and had no issues. Maybe you won't with your budget mouse. It might be some kind of radio interference in some cases that does not occur for everyone. The USB card is so inexpensive that there is no great loss if it doesn't work well for that purpose. You can also stick a flash memory or something else in the USB port if the wireless mouse doesn't work well enough. The empty slot isn't serving any purpose, so you have nothing to lose.
     
  10. TBoneSan

    TBoneSan Laptop Fiend

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    You're right, there's nothing to loose. I've finally decided ill rip out my ODD too for a HDD raid 0 so I think ill do the upgrade all together.
    I think this R2 will finally be brimming with hardware then.. :twitchy:
     
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