Looking for a reliable Wireless Gaming Mouse

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by droidfury, Sep 2, 2014.

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  1. droidfury

    droidfury Notebook Consultant

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    I am currently in a market for a reliable gaming mouse.

    I've come down to these 2 http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-G700s-Rechargeable-Gaming-Mouse/dp/B00BFOEY3Y/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1409666925&sr=8-1&keywords=logitech+g700s and Amazon.com: Bloody R8A wireless gaming mouse: Computers & Accessories.

    I have read some reviews and but still I can't decide due to the result that I have seen were only personal preferences and uses. So I want to know some other professional inputs here. If also there are other options available for me, please do share them. Although I don't really prefer a razer brand due to their prices, if you can share some advantages that will make it worth it then I might consider it. Thank you in advance. :)
     
  2. Mobius 1

    Mobius 1 Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    I'm not so sure of the bloody's wireless implementation (I have the wired model). But you can give it a try, the mouse's build quality is nice and the sensor is pretty decent with native 400dpi steps and 2m/s max tracking speed. My only problem is the mouse glide being unsuited for soft mousepads.


    The safest option is the G602 from Logitech, though the shape and weight is not that compact :/
     
  3. radji

    radji Farewell, Solenya...

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    Razer Mamba or Razer Orochi (I have the Orochi).

    Mamba is meant more for a desktop or mostly stationary laptop.

    Orochi is meant more for an on the go gamer.
     
  4. Mobius 1

    Mobius 1 Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Mamba / Orochi: PTE sensor, extremely sensitive to dust and vibrations, Z-axis tracking issue, and dynamic DPI scaling at slow swipes.

    Keep in mind that the Orochi doesn't support more than 125hz polling via bluetooth, it's nothing more than an office mouse once you use the bluetooth mode.
     
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  5. radji

    radji Farewell, Solenya...

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    Dust, yes. Most optical mice will get a bit buggy when the sensor gets dusty. More so with a higher DPI sensor.

    Vibrations...? I have taken this mouse on a plane with me and not seen any detrimental effect. And its usual spot is on the laptop board on the bed next to me. Even with all my rolling around, I've not seen any adverse effects to vibrations large or small.

    I was warned about this. Haven't seen a twitch yet.

    I don't think the Orochi supports dynamic DPI in bluetooth. Only in wired mode.

    A high polling rate isn't always necessary during gaming. Besides, all mice using USB 2.0 poll at 125hz by default, so that would make all USB mice office mice.

    Mouse Polling Rate: Important or bunk? - Ars Technica OpenForum

    Evaluating Mice: DPI And Polling Rate - Four Keyboards And Four Mice For LAN Party Gamers, Rounded-Up
     
  6. Mobius 1

    Mobius 1 Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    PTE's tracking is ruined by a single speck of dust in the lens / surface. Usually it spazzes out (older ones). Optical can still be OK when having a small amount of dust in the sensor or the mousepad.

    Vibrations such as speakers, subwoofers, etc can cause jitter in the mouse input signal (evident in paint), the early Razer mouses with PTE also suffer from minor Z-axis issue when clicking the mouse over a soft mousepad (usually mousepads sink a little when you click a mouse over it).

    Z-axis occurs when you LIFT the mouse off the surface, causing a downward and to the right motion not seen in most optical or laser sensor. This is extremely detrimental to low DPI players who have to lift the mouse often from the surface to reposition.

    The 2nd set of optical sensor (most presumably a low cost A3050) is used only for lift distance calculation and will cut off the PTE sensor if the A3050 reaches it's max LOD. This can cause extra input lag because the mouse MCU has to process signal from TWO different sensor at one time.

    Dynamic DPI scaling was implemented to reduce the effect of vibration and soft mousepad, it REDUCES the DPi when you don't move the mouse or when you swipe it slowly. It's harmful to your aim, it creates massive negative accel and causes you to be inconsistent.

    Most of PTE's flaw (except the Z-axis tracking issue) can be fixed with a hard mousepad out of plastic or metal material. This is because hard mousepad has a much more uniform surface and doesn't really bend down or sink because of pressure. The problem with these kind of mousepad is that they are expensive and relatively small compared to cloth mousepads. Low sensitivity FPS players do not like hard pads because they don't provide any kind of friction when you swipe across it (dynamic friction), and that it doesn't feel as nice to your skin compared to cloth mousepad.


    Now you might be thinking: Why not raise your DPi and sensitivity so you don't raise as much and can use a hard pad better.

    Changing your sensitivity requires you to relearn the muscle memory gained when using your previous sensitivity, how much you need to swipe to rotate this much etc. In fast paced games like CS, muscle memory is very important to perform quick corner checks and snap to targets without needing to match your crosshair visually (you remember how much distance it is required to swipe to that target).

    Lower sensitivity is also much more beneficial to accuracy, you can adjust your aim better. Using high sensitivity requires you to aim with your wrists (which is less accurate and is more stressful on your motoric controls.




    125/500hz is noticeably more choppy when moving the mouse, your EYES might not see it, but when aiming in game it gets annoying and the tracking feels very weird. Low hz can also cause lower tracking speed evident with the Microsoft Intellimouse-MLT04 series (1.6m/s on 1000hz, 1.0m/s less on 125hz): PHOTOS: Mouse 125Hz vs 500Hz vs 1000Hz | Blur Busters (with G-SYNC and G9x mouse)


    Don't just assume that bad things don't happen if you don't see them, it will cause you to miss more often and the mouse will feel less "connected" to your hand.

    Mouse normally polls around 125hz, yes, but that's the MINIMUM level you can set in a gaming mouse, not the max. Most mouse supports 1000 and 500hz as standard. This can be changed with the drivers that comes with it (or some mouses they have a physical button on the chassis)

    The only exeception on mouses that you should not poll at 1000hz is the Zowie with 3090 sensor and some Microsoft Intellimouse-MLT04 (most can be stable at 1000hz, some isn't)





    Also, uninstall Razer synapse after you're done configuring the mouse. Synapse is a cancer to mouse tracking and seriously messes with the maximum tracking speed. It takes the highest DPi out of the sensor and software interpolates it to a lower level. For example the max DPi is 800 and you set it to 400 in Synapse, it will drop every 2nd count from the sensor via software filter and you end up with 1/2 the tracking speed + added input delay because of software processing.




    But hey, don't let me stop you from using PTE sensor and all it's flaws. Just my 2cents.

    Edit: and don't forget that since PTE stands for Philips Twin Eye, one of two laser sensor can die prematurely leading to a problem called axis death (mouse does not track X or Y direction)
     
  7. radji

    radji Farewell, Solenya...

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    ^^^:eek2:

    Wow. Little itchy aren't ya?

    I still recommend the Orochi.
     
  8. droidfury

    droidfury Notebook Consultant

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    @radji and Mobius 1

    Thank you guys for the inputs that you've shared. I know I ask for a professional inputs for this one but I didn't expect the kind of answers that you've given. I guess your responses were too "professional" , LOL. Anyway about the mice that you have suggested, first the orochi, I have read the review about it and I'm kind of skeptical to buy it because of its wireless issue (bluetooth disconnecting issue). Also It does not come with a nano receiver. I have read good things about the G602 but I do you think G700s would be better because it is rechargeable? I have looked for some other choices, the mamba and naga epic but their prices were too much for their performance. I am basing this on what I have read on other forums. I would also like to ditch the A4tech R8A in my choices since it doesn't have a replaceable battery. Basically, what I am looking for is something with a great or at least decent battery life and does perform well too. Although, backlit features on razer and some other brands are a plus but I can live without it. If you have still have other suggestions please do share them. Thank You
     
  9. Mobius 1

    Mobius 1 Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Roccat Pyra wireless, not sure how'd you like this one (pretty small). Sensor is the same as the R8A, but has a custom 0.5x magnification lens that doubles the perfect control speed (but as a negative effect it limits the "real" DPi to 1600).
    PMW3305DK sensor, good precision but has angle snapping (angle snapping | Mark's Devblog), RED LED illumination.



    G700s has A9800 laser sensor, this is an extremely bad sensor if you play anything that needs precision cursor movement. There is about 0-5% randomly occuring positive acceleration (on cloth mousepad), which means for every swipe it will be perfect or overshoot anywhere from 0.001-5%. It also has an added smoothing (which adds to the input lag) which is essential to crank the sensor up to 8200DPi. Plus it's extremely heavy. You can remedy this slightly by using a hard pad, but not completely. Overall the cursor feels very floaty, laggy and imprecise (testing with A9800 based Bloody TL8).

    Any mouse that advertises "laser" and 8200 (A9500) or 5600 (A9500) has the above symptoms.




    I can't really say about Bluetooth in the Orochi, but from my experience with a bluetooth mouse (Apple magic), I'd just stay away. There's so much problems such as random disconnects, mouse stopped syncing with PC, etc etc.


    So either the Pyra wireless or the G602 would be my only recommendation.

    Edit: pyra has rechargeable battery, not sure if removable.
     
  10. droidfury

    droidfury Notebook Consultant

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    Thanks man, I think I will opt for the G602 then.
     
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