Looking for a colorimeter

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by Shivi Vats, Apr 10, 2017.

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  1. Support.2@XOTIC PC

    Support.2@XOTIC PC Company Representative

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    Couldn't find it, may have sold it. :(
     
  2. Shivi Vats

    Shivi Vats Notebook Enthusiast

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    Ah, that's sad.
    Thanks for your help anyways!
     
  3. Peon

    Peon Notebook Virtuoso

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    First of all, X-Rite's i1 Display Pro is generally considered superior to Datacolor's Sypders. But ultimately, you might be better off with the Spyder 5:

    As kent1146 alluded to, the pucks themselves are pretty much all $5 cheap plastic Made in China devices regardless of what you get. What you're really paying for is the software.

    And therein lies the complications. Unlike, say, a keyboard or a USB stick, where your Windows XP-era devices still work with your new Windows 10 laptop, these colorimeter packages are targeted towards professionals/enterprises who have deep pockets.

    Did a new version of Windows just come out? Well, Datacolor and X-Rite probably aren't going to release updated drivers for the new OS - they're just going to sell you a new package.

    Or did you upgrade from a standard gamut to a wide gamut display? Well, I hope you purchased a sufficiently high end package to cover that, otherwise you'll have to pay for a new package. And of course, there's always the risk that your next monitor will have some kind of technology that simply doesn't exist today - for instance, everyone had to buy a new colorimeter when LED backlighting first replaced CCFL about a decade ago.

    There *is* open source software out there that's compatible with multiple pucks, but I've heard it's not very good.

    As you can see, there's a lot of planned obsolescence at work here, so you might be best off just buying the package which minimally meets your requirements today, and buy a new package further down the road if those requirements change.
     
  4. Shivi Vats

    Shivi Vats Notebook Enthusiast

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    The thing is, I'm spending way over my budget of $2-2.2k for my new laptop (and some accessories) and I need the equipment to be as cost efficient as possible, so that I can save the most money. As long as a colorimeter will be more cost efficient down the line than a professional display calibration for my laptop, I'm fine with it.
    But thanks anyways, because I didn't know all this stuff that you just mentioned. Now I know that I'll have to go buy new colorimeters down the line, but that's fine with me.
     
  5. Peon

    Peon Notebook Virtuoso

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    Actually, what's your motivation for calibrating your screen? It probably won't improve your general computing experience by very much if at all, so if your budget is limited, upgrading your laptop to a better/higher-quality screen will provide a much more visually pleasing experience.

    Of course, it's a completely different story if you're being paid for professional imaging/graphics work, in which case most professional display calibrations are pretty bad and you should go all out and profile with a spectrophotometer after calibration to double check the colorimeter's own accuracy - remember, these are cheap $5 devices, their manufacture has *wide* tolerances for quality.

    Now, I hope I haven't been too negative, but as you can probably tell, I'm pretty frustrated by the whole color industry myself.
     
  6. Shivi Vats

    Shivi Vats Notebook Enthusiast

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    OK this is brand new knowledge to me.
    In a lot of reviews I have read that laptop displays dont come with a good color quality from factory(like 65% SRGB color gamut) and after calibration can get upto 96% SRGB.
    Isn't that a significant difference(like a 50% increase)?
    I have never owned such a high-end laptop and it is the first time I've researched about color gamuts and a variety of other things, so I just thought that a color calibration would be necessary.
    I'm sorry to sound like a noob in this department.
    And no, I'm not being paid to do any graphics work, or any kind of work that requires extremely crisp colors. Just want a good display, that's all.
     
  7. tijo

    tijo Sacred Blame

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    You will only be capable of calibrating the up to what it is capable of doing. Calibration will give you better color accuracy, but it will not improve by much if you have a low end display to begin with. You have some displays that are only capable of covering 60% sRGB no matter the calibration because that the physical limit of the hardware.

    What peon means is that if you have a crappy display to begin with, you are better off spending money on getting a laptop with a higher quality display. Even uncalibrated, it will look much better that a low end display. Get good hardware before you even think of getting a colorimeter.

    As an example, the displays on my XPS 15 and M6700 look good even uncalibrated. They have that distinctive blue hue associated with LED backlights when not calibrated, but even then, they look pretty darn good. The XPS calibrates close to full aRGB, the M6700 covers 98%sRGB. My Elitebook has a meh display that is in the 55% sRGB range, regardless of calibration, the colors will not look as vibrant and a bit washed. There is nothing I can do about it because the display can't go past the physical limits of the hardware.

    Be careful, they may not all have the same hardware. I know that the Spyder 4 Basic doesn't have the exact same hardware than the Pro and Elite. The Pro 4 and Elite 4 however share the exact same hardware and only the software differs. Back when I looked into it, the Basic seemed to have some pretty limited options while I saw no reason to go for the Elite over the Pro.

    Where I found my Spider to be most useful is in getting my multiple monitor setups to look consistent between multiple monitors. It's a "minor annoyance" to move a window between displays only to see the colors shift, but it can be pretty distracting.
     
  8. Shivi Vats

    Shivi Vats Notebook Enthusiast

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    Thank you for the info!
    I'll get the laptop first and then decide if a colorimeter is worth getting.
    I think this is the right way to go now.


    Thanks to everyone that has helped me with this! @kent1146 @Mobius 1 @Tanner@XoticPC @Peon @tijo
     
  9. Support.2@XOTIC PC

    Support.2@XOTIC PC Company Representative

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    The 17" 4K MSI models typically have a high Adobe RGB, as do many of the ASUS models.
     
  10. Shivi Vats

    Shivi Vats Notebook Enthusiast

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    I already have my mind set on a P650HS-G, though! Have almost finalized the purchase too!
     
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