Liquid Metal and 33+ tape

Discussion in 'Notebook Cosmetic Modifications and Custom Builds' started by B0B, Jun 3, 2019.

  1. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    On a laptop or a vertically mounted desktop motherboard/GPU, you should still use run-off protection of some sort, as the viscosity is the same as other liquid metal. It is not a paste consistency. It is easier to spread simply because it seems to adhere to the surface(s) much better. You don't have to scrub or massage it into the surface a lot to make it stick. It applies more like paint. I'm not sure why that is, but I am certainly not going to complain about that, LOL.

    If you remember, the old Liquid Ultra use to go on that way, then Coollaboratory changed something. Now Liquid Ultra and, to a lesser extent, Conductonaut have something different in their formula that almost seems to repel the surface you are trying to apply it to. This goes on and sticks nicely, like the old Liquid Ultra used to.

    Run-off protection...
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2020
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  2. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKs Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

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    Coollaboratory made a new liquid metal last year with more paste-like texture for easier application.
    Coollaboratory Liquid Extreme

    I'm sure they screwed up their own recipe/formula to be more equal Conductonaut (Conductonaut beat them in a couple of tests). Then a few year later make a new formula equal old Liquid ultra and brand it with the "Extreme" surname to be able to charge more (+5%) for the barely higher 3 W/mK or the easier application. None should change their own winning horse (for Coollaboratory, screw up the old working Liquid Ultra recipe)
    upload_2020-1-24_3-1-19.png
    I don't trust Coollaboratory anymore. And none should trust the W/mK numbers floating around from the different brands.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2020
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  3. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    I agree. I stopped buying Coollaboratory products several years ago. They violated the cardinal rule. "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." It seems to be a popular concept to ruin excellence instead of leaving it alone. Superior products don't stay superior when you start screwing with them. Stupidity is abundant. We are completely surrounded by retards in the tech world.
     
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  4. BrightSmith

    BrightSmith Notebook Evangelist

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    @Mr. Fox after a few months did the straws hold? Planning on repasting myself tomorrow and I wanted to try your method.

    Can't easily find of 33+ or Kapton here, would TESA tape also work: https://www.tesa.com/en/consumer/tesa-insulating-tape-electrical-pvc-tape.html
     
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  5. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    That kind of tape might be too thick. You'd have to try it and find out.

    I haven't taken the MECH-15 apart to inspect the Kapton straws. I've taken it on numerous trips and start another one tomorrow. I have no reason to suspect it is not working as intended.

    That said, there is nothing wrong with using foam, as long as it is thin and compressible enough. The foam insert from a cheap 120mm fan filter like the one shown below should work well.
    upload_2020-2-21_10-1-36.png
     
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  6. BrightSmith

    BrightSmith Notebook Evangelist

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    The tape is indeed quite thick, but it works, at least for the moment.
     
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  7. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    Great. Looks like it wasn't "too thick" so you should be good to go. If it was going to be an issue it would have been obvious from the start. I don't think you have any need to worry based on the nice temps you are seeing.
     
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  8. jotm

    jotm Notebook Evangelist

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    Is that heat resistant? They melt and burn easily in my experience...

    I reckon you really don't want that to happen under the heatsink D:
     
  9. BrightSmith

    BrightSmith Notebook Evangelist

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    Tesa isolating tape is heat and even flame resistant. But let's be clear if you apply LM en your temps >90 degrees You're Doing It Wrong ;-)
     
  10. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    OK, I took it apart today and the straws had held up fine. The heat sink was stuck in place pretty well--more than I anticipated--and had to be carefully pried off (to avoid bending it). I found none of the liquid metal had spilled out anywhere and the Kapton tape straws had done exactly what I intended for them to do.

    I put it back together using foam dams cut from the air filter element (shown in previous post) and that works nicely. I ran a Time Spy Stress Test (full 20 passes) and the temps leveled out at 80°C max on CPU and GPU. That was with no GPU undervolt. The CPU and GPU were within about 2°C of one another, with the CPU and GPU constantly trading spaces at being the hotter/colder part.

    I took the motherboard out to investigate why the top panel between the display hinges gets so stinking hot all of the time and the only thing I can see to explain it is the CPU, GPU and GPU memory, and the VRMs for both (all of which generate heat) are just too near the chassis to not make it hot, and no air movement to evacuate the heat trapped in that very narrow air space. The other reason it gets hot is that it is metal. Plastic would get equally hot, but wouldn't feel so hot to the touch as metal. Plastic and metal have their pros and cons, but metal still wins in my book.

    That hot chassis thing kind of sucks, but the alternative is that the heat stays on the silicon and that is definitely not a good option. Better for the chassis to take the heat than leave it on the chips. To facilitate using the chassis as a heat sink, I added thermal pads to serve as the conduit. That DEFINITELY works. The chassis gets A WHOLE LOT hotter now and the CPU and GPU both run cooler now, LOL. 0.5mm pads (just some old used ones I had in my junk box) fit perfectly. I placed the pads directly on foil cover on the opposite side of the CPU die, GPU die and GPU memory.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    @B0B
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2020
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