Linux Tips and Tweaks and Other Help

Discussion in 'Linux Compatibility and Software' started by Mr. Fox, Jul 15, 2020.

  1. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    I greatly prefer the Windows-like desktop environment of Linux Mint with Cinnamon and even installed Cinnamon in Pop_OS so I could tolerate using it. I do not care for the Unity desktop environment.
     
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  2. TheDantee

    TheDantee Notebook Evangelist

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    Have you tried MATE or KDE they are similar to windows also XFCE is nice and lightweight u just have to move some things around to make it more windows like... I tried KDE in PopOS not as smooth as the default GNOME was though.

    Sent from my SM-N975F using Tapatalk
     
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  3. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    Yes, I have tried both. They're ok and definitely better than Unity. Definitely lightweight in comparison, but not as aesthetically pleasing to me. One of the things I despise about Windows 10 is the light-colored UI with no transparency. Cinnamon has most of the pleasant aesthetics that I appreciate about Windows 7 and are missing in Windows 10.
     
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  4. TheDantee

    TheDantee Notebook Evangelist

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    That's the beauty of Linux many options to choose from!

    Sent from my SM-N975F using Tapatalk
     
  5. jclausius

    jclausius Notebook Virtuoso

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    And the switch in Ubuntu to use Gnome Desktop (away from Unity) is even more horrendous. I've been working on getting a guy at work to switch from Win 10 (due to the great info we've documented in the "Windows Software" thread. He's been using Ubuntu 20.04 for about a month now, and is really struggling. Doesn't like this little thing or that (especially with how the file system UI is presented and its behavior with operations). When time allows I'm going to have him save any data in his Home directory, and we're going to switch him to Mint. I think it will suit him better as he's been a long time Windows user.
     
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  6. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    That is really smart. Mint should make the transition much easier. I really like Windows, but there are too many things about Windows 10 that suck for it to be considered a good product. It is inferior in numerous ways, but familiarity is extremely difficult to compete with, even for anyone with an active interest in transitioning from Windows to Linux.

    What I am referring to has very little to do with technical competency and everything to do with normal human nature and plain old-fashioned common sense. And, I am not really referring to resistance to change. I actually like change and embrace it. It makes life more interesting. Resistance to change seems to be something Linux fans are challenged with as much, perhaps more, than the Windows 10 Kool-Aid drinkers. What I do not like (and most people do not) are inconvenience and unnecessary complications. Those things can easily overshadow the benefit of change. If implemented correctly, change doesn't have to be inconvenient or carry too many complications.

    The list of things I like about Linux would be a fairly long one, and I would be preaching to the choir in a Linux thread. I really like Linux a lot and my plan is for it to eventually replace Windows 10. In spite of that, there are a few things about Linux that make transitioning more challenging, even for the exceptionally tech-savvy. For me the challenging things are:
    • The functionality of the OS is more easily broken due to user error, incompatibilities or package dependencies.
    • Inability to run all of the Windows software I am used to and wish to continue using.
    • No functional equivalent for all of the Windows software I am used to and wish to continue using.
    • Not thrilled with the aesthetic differences. This is a bigger deal than some people think. It ranks very high in importance to me, and coincidentally, it's one of the things I hate about Windows 10, and hated even more about Windows 8.X. The typical Linux UI colors, visual themes, fonts, icons and cursors are frequently very ugly and have an antiquated look and feel to them.
    • Inconsistencies between distros, terminal commands, repository-specific nuances, etc. can be terribly inconvenient and often result in wasted time looking for information to do something simple. When it involves something I won't do frequently, the knowledge may not be retained for future use no matter how simple the task might be.
    • Far more difficult to find technical information, documentation and support due to the comparatively minuscule experienced user base. What is available, while often comprehensive and technically excellent, is limited to what the Linux experts care about most. This is also a limiting factor in the availability and variety of software for Linux. Linux software developers are fewer in number, many are volunteers and they are not going to burn a bunch of calories on things that are not important to them. I wouldn't either if I were in their shoes, so I am not being critical with this observation and merely pointing out the obvious by stating the fact of the matter.
    Setting aside things related to the general suckiness of Apple hardware, a lot of the above could be applied to the prospect of transitioning from Windows to Mac OS X or vice-versa. Micro$lop and crApple both know this and they milk it for all it's worth. They get away with a lot of crap and nonsense because of it. At some point, the convenience of maintaining status quo as a creature of habit is no longer enough to justify tolerating it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2020
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  7. TheDantee

    TheDantee Notebook Evangelist

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    1 - I agree that things can get broken easily by installing packages but I feel the Ubuntu Based Distros handle this pretty decently they don't break as easily as say Gentoo or Arch but I'm sure it is still possible to break the OS. I think the solution is not to have some Distros where there are things u just can't delete restricting file system access to the user but instead to notify the user what they are doing before it happens. Sorry I can't comment much on how other distros (as only used most other distros under a month as a daily) handle package installs but for me on Arch when I go to install a package it lets me know the conflicts and what packages will be uninstalled before I actually go through with installing that package. Of course, since this is Arch there is no warning saying hey! this is an important package, but if there were a distro to say Are you really sure you want to delete this package this is crucial and is needed for "blank" function... I think that would help a lot of people learning Linux know what packages are necessities.

    2 - This is due to lack of Linux support why would I develop software for 3% of the OS UserBase? I've even seen it as bad as some game devs saying straight up just install windows like the rest of the population. The more people on the OS Asking for support the more inclined devs will be to develop for it.. but its a two-sided thing people don't want to use something without there familiar apps. There are many great replacements for the average user GIMP, Krita replace Photoshop on an Average level and LibreOffice does what I need it to, instead of Autodesk Maya we get Blender which I agree is definitely not even close to the same but I install a Maya control config and can sort of learn my way around made it much easier to use Blender. We still have Sublime Text VSCODE Brackets etc for Programming IDEs. Overall I say your not giving up much if your willing to try new things and give them a fair chance.

    3 - What software are you looking for exactly? Benchmarking tools? We have prime95 you can download right from there site on Arch its called mprime, we also have handbrake. As for alternatives you have Phoronix Suite which does many different tests, we also have all of the unigine benchmarks. http://lbs.sourceforge.net/ here's a link you can find more benchmarks here.

    4 - You can freely change the entire Icon Pack, the Cursor, Font, and Font Sizes. I find the colors to be fine you can add background blur to apps with Kvantum for KDE and LXQt I know there's something for Gnome to but this makes it more Windows Aero like. You can even change the border color of apps to match your overall theme. Linux also offers .ICC Monitor Profile Control if that's what your looking for.

    5 - Yes the inconsistency between distros bothers me to I actually used mint first but just lightly before Diving headfirst into Arch and failing many many times post-install with deleting the wrong packages and stuff but after using it so long I'm kinda stuck here I don't like the way other Distros commands are nor do I have the willingness to really learn them just to try out there Distro. I think it would be nice to see 1 uniform command line structure and I may upset people in saying that but it would make swapping Distros easier to try new things, However, I feel that Linux should have many flavors of Linux Distros just take Ubuntu, for example, lots of people like the Simplicity of it so they take the back and Improve it in there own way and Boom! You have Mint, PopOS, Zorin OS, Elementary OS, etc. all changing just a few things for the people who may not like Stock Ubuntu just as they don't.

    6 - I actually have to disagree with you on this one the Arch Forums have been great and anything not Arch specific like a KVM for example I've been able to find information for without an issue lots of in-depth GitHub writeups out there if you look for a few minutes. However, I do understand that most people who run into an issue there first instinct is not to look up the error. But I know the Ubuntu Forums should be really good for finding solutions also so I don't understand what it is you haven't been able to find. A lot of people volunteer there time is correct and that's a great Community! Does Windows have that heck no! All you get on Windows is Youtube videos to sketchy download links that try to give you viruses some community that is, and I know there are a few good people out there with answers but they get silenced under the many.

    I would also like to add to my Previous point even though it wasn't asked I feel it's important, Linux downloads virtually everything through the Repo Stores (If your on Arch Literally Everything... lol) this makes things so much safer to newbies looking for the software no sketchy download links no complete this survey to unlock this software none of that crap just right off the secure store. That is, in my opinion, one of my favorite things about Linux. Again I can't comment much on how much software is on the other stores but as noted on Arch everything is there not just apps drivers even verified tools like libvirt for your KVM not even an app just some commands for a KVM. I find this being the safest way to download software in an internet filled with ads and scammers posting fake links or modified versions of the software. I would like to see the Arch AUR bring over the feature from Elementary OS where they give you the option to donate to the developer that would be a nice way to know the developer is getting your money and make it easy to donate as well for those who don't spam links like most developers, like the ones mentioned earlier just volunteering there time out of the goodness of there heart.

    I think most people should do a Full Switch of there OS after testing Linux for a month or so you can get pretty much all the games working but EAC and some other Anti Cheat games working but EAC is currently the main WIP at the moment things are constantly getting improved, Im sure many of you have heard of this site but I'll post the link anyway it's safe to sign in (if you don't trust me that's fine you can still look up any game you're looking for without signing in) and shows your entire library of what works and doesn't for some people what fixes they needed to apply to get said game working, etc this allows everyone to play just by a few people volunteering there time to fix issues. Its also a very convenient way to literally every steam game that may need a fix or a Steam Command line option to run instead of scouring the web, as you mentioned in your 6th point. anyway here's the link for anyone interested - https://www.protondb.com/

    EDIT - Mods if Links are an issue please inform me and I will remove them no sense in deleting the entire post.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2020
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  8. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    I agree with about 99% of what you said.

    Agreed... mostly. The lack of Linux support (third-party) is a major reason for the lack of Linux adoption. My contempt for Micro$lop is why I am now using LibreOffice and eM Client (Outlook replacement) instead of Micro$lop Office. GIMP is a close replacement for Photoshop. Not quite as easy to use, probably because I have used Photoshop for roughly 15 years. I also hate Adobe. I am working on transitioning, but it is exactly that... work. It requires learning and effort. That is also a major reason for lack of Linux adoption. Most people are lazy. And, software and driver developers are in it for money. It's their livelihood. If they're not going to make money doing it, they are not going to do it. And, if they don't do it anyway, then they're never going to make money on it because the adoption of Linux, if they don't do it, will make it to where Linux software and driver development is a waste of their time that provides no meaningful income. Kind of a vicious circle. I can understand the reasons for it.
    Oh, don't even get me started here, LOL. Linux benchmarking tools are utterly worthless to me. I need everything in this list for Linux to be usable for benchmarking. https://hwbot.org/benchmarks/ and as it stands now, Linux has nothing on the list. This also relates indirectly to the comments above. Lack of support for Linux means a lack of adoption. Most people are not going to give up something they enjoy just because Micro$lop sucks.
    Yes, I agree. It is possible and I have done it because the default UI is unacceptable to me. It's not something most people that are looking for a Windows 10 alternative are going to figure out. They'll look at it and say no thank you. Again, it required time and energy on my part because I am serious about wanting to ditch Windows 10. Otherwise, I never would have bothered to figure it out.
    Case in point... my X299 Dark Soundblaster Recon3Di 5.1 audio only works in stereo. The additional channels and subwoofer don't function in Linux. I have spent hours looking for a fix and asked for help from Linux experts. Things that some were certain would work, didn't. It appears to be a lack of Linux driver support from Creative. Again, not necessarily the fault of Linux as much as lack of third-party Linux support, but the end result is the same for me as an end-user. The reason(s) doesn't really matter. It just doesn't work. Having a nice community is great and all that, but that didn't make it work and I won't get back any of the time I wasted trying to get it to work. But, that's life in the big city. Not a deal-breaker for me, although it definitely would be for some folks that are passionate about having 5.1 support instead of plain old basic no-frills stereo output.



    We agree on essentially all of it. My post approaches it from the angle of what matters to me and what the impediments are I am encountering in my quest to replace Windows 10 with Linux. I am still determined to do it (apart from HWBOT benching, which is simply not possible). Most people are not as determined as you and I. Most people are lazy and are only going to do something if it is easy. I think that makes us better than them, but I can certainly see where they are coming from. Switching from Windows to Linux is a big deal, and if you expect it to turn out the same then you're approaching it with a flawed perspective that may lead to disappointment. For me it is a matter of coming to grips with what I am willing to sacrifice to make the switch. It will involve doing without some things I'd prefer not to do without. And, I will probably continue to dual-boot after the full switch so I don't have to do without some things.

    Bottom line for me is Linux is better than Windows 10, but it's not perfect... as much as I would like it to be. Neither is Windows 10. They both have pros and cons, but Linux is awesome enough that I want it to replace Windows 10 for almost everything I do with a PC.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2020
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  9. jeffreyC

    jeffreyC Notebook Enthusiast

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    When you save the data make sure that you get rid of the config files.
    Configs from incompatible versions in other distros create problems that will drive you crazy trying to figure out what is causing them.
     
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  10. TheDantee

    TheDantee Notebook Evangelist

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    Yeah I know some people use Linux for work and releasing and maintaining a Linux version would be hard for some devs but we have a great community here... maybe Open Source the Software and some people may volunteer they time to make a Linux port? KVM is currently the best way to run Windows apps without a performance hit its around 1% impact no Wine no DXVK overhead BS. For benchmarking though that 1% could mean a higher score I get that. It's an endless circle back and forth hopefully enough people get sick of Microsoft Sh*t and switch over full time so these companies see Linux as a worthwhile platform to develop for, with gaming through Wine becoming more refined its a good step forward, but its not enough. I think it's worth the development as it's great to be able to convert DirectX to Vulkan but I don't see it as an end goal solution more like a bandaid solution while more of the Enthusiast transfer to Linux full time who don't mind applying a tweak or fix here or there to get a game working. Then I think we will start to see more devs launching Native Linux Game support meaning plug and play support like Windows just click play and it works then I think we will see more switch to Linux as it will be as easy to use as Windows. It reminds me of years back when Nvidia and Intel started dominating AMD and everyone was just sitting there still buying Nvidia and Intel saying "I wish AMD would release some competitive hardware" yet they don't support their current line. Without a backend of support, how can R&D be done? People just expect things it seems.

    Yes, I'm aware a lot is lacking. I can definitely agree with you there but without people wanting these tools the companies will not release the tools for Linux using a Vulkan encoder as of course DirectX does work without DXVK.

    Is this the same Chip that's used in the EVGA Nu card? I think I saw a driver for that before. I found this with a Quick Search - https://www.reddit.com/r/SoundBlast...ad/sound_blaster_r3dr3dizzxrae5_linux_driver/ also this Z97 Board though https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=236364 sounds more like its the actual card, not the motherboard chip version but worth a shot I guess. Again that's, why more Distros should exist for people looking for the nice UI there are so many OOB Options for Linux but only the same main ones, are constantly recommended, unfortunately.

    It shouldn't though there needs to be a Distro that goes out of its way to add a Simplistic UI for the many who wants things to be easy, don't know much about computers, and just works! Everyone's needs from an OS are different there's so much to cover slowly getting there. More bugs reported more people wanting support for things the better in the long run. I suggest looking into setting up a KVM it's not gonna be great for benching if your serious which I'm sure you are but it's worth looking at, this is actually the current method to get Hackintosh working on TRX40 and people are using it in a professional space for Adobe and stuff, so it shows the performance impact is very minimal the benchmarks from my 3990X I posted the other day are also from a KVM, I hate rebooting to use 1 thing KVM is much easier for me at least.
     
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