Lenovo Thinkpad X120e User Review

Discussion in 'Lenovo' started by MidnightSun, Mar 26, 2011.

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  1. akwok

    akwok Notebook Enthusiast

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    Your WEI seems to be a bit off in the "Gaming Graphics" category -- did you install the latest Catalyst drivers off of AMD.com?

    My X120e scores are as follows (4GB ram, X25-M G2 SSD):

    3.8: Processor
    5.6: Memory
    4.1: Graphics
    5.6: Gaming Graphics
    7.5: Primary Hard Disk
     
  2. MidnightSun

    MidnightSun Emodicon

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    I do, CCC 2.1 updated 02/15/11. Funnily enough, I just reran WEI and got the following numbers, which are more in line with yours:

    Processor: 3.8
    Memory (RAM): 5.6
    Graphics: 4.1
    Gaming Graphics: 5.7
    Primary Hard Disk: 7.5

    If anything, it's a testament to how fickle WEI can be :rolleyes:
     
  3. Benchmade 42

    Benchmade 42 Titanium

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    The dual core e350 scores 3.8 on cpu, I wonder what the score on single core e240.
     
  4. MidnightSun

    MidnightSun Emodicon

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    Thanks, I hope so too! The price is what really did it for me, as I would not have paid $450+ for the X120e, as much as I like it. As a secondary computer, I didn't want it to break the bank.

    I'd imagine it'd be a fair bit lower, seeing as it's a single-core 1.5GHz processor (one core deactivated) whereas the E-350 is a dual-core 1.6GHz processor. Impossible to predict without actually benching it in WEI, though, since WEI isn't really linear.

    The E-350 just seems like a no-brainer upgrade, as both the E-240 and E-350 are rated at a TDP of 18W and seem to have very similar battery life in reviews, and the price difference is a not-too-bad $30.
     
  5. miner

    miner Notebook Nobel Laureate

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  6. onthesc

    onthesc Notebook Enthusiast

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    nice review!

    i am going to put in a ssd in it as well. i was wondering if there is any difference in doing a clean install or installing off the recovery image. Since Lenovo's image does come with their Enhanced Experience 2.0, but might include more junk. But it will take care of most of the driver problems easier right?
     
  7. junglerumble

    junglerumble Notebook Consultant

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    I to want to put ssd too. Hope it's easy. Gonna try to find the cheapest I can get. 120gb ssd would be perfect.
     
  8. MidnightSun

    MidnightSun Emodicon

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    Lenovo's EE is supposed to, basically, cut down on startup time. There are some differences performance-wise, but it's very minimal. I believe someone on SD who bought two X120e laptops with identical specs put a clean install of W7 Ultimate on one and left the stock Lenovo EE 2.0 W7 HP install on the other, and they booted within seconds of each other.

    Personally, I would rather go with a clean install. Drivers aren't too difficult for the X120e (or for that matter, most Thinkpads) with Lenovo's reliable driver support. Probably the easiest way is to manually install the WiFi driver, then use TV System Update to grab most of the applicable software/drivers you want, and finish up the things it misses.

    A great W7 clean install guide can be found here.

    The hardware replacement is simple. Remove the three screws securing the base, remove one screw securing the HDD caddy, then slide the caddy and remove. Swap the caddy from the HDD to your new SSD, then replace (make sure to slide the caddy all the way until it completely connects tightly with the SATA connector) and screw all the screws back.

    I'd suggest giving the Intel X25-M G2 120GB SSD a look--it's the larger-size version of the X25-M G2 80GB SSD that's in my T500, which has given me stellar performance and great reliability (install and forget).
     
  9. lineS of flight

    lineS of flight Notebook Virtuoso

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    @Midnight Sun...nice review....thanks! Quick question: I noted that you said that the recovery disks can be made on CDs, DVDs and on a USB. I am most interested in the latter. Any idea as to how much space was use up to create and hold the recovery disks? I'd prefer to use the USB option to store at least one copy of the recovery disks. Also, can I copy the recovery disks from the USB onto DVDs for parallel storage? Thanks.
     
  10. lbhuang42

    lbhuang42 Notebook Enthusiast

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    I've got a pretty barebones X120E, with E-240 and 5400 RPM drive. My WEI numbers:

    Processor: 2.5
    Memory: 4.5
    Graphics: 4.2
    Gaming: 5.7
    Hard disk: 6.9
     
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