Lenovo ThinkPad P73, really worth it?

Discussion in 'Lenovo' started by SMGJohn, Nov 10, 2019.

  1. SMGJohn

    SMGJohn Notebook Evangelist

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    Just to get it out of the way, I love ThinkPads but there is always something to criticise, such as their audio, performance or just the pricing on the higher end models.

    I want to reach out to ThinkPad P73 owners and their opinion on whether this machine is really worth the premium price or if its overrated.

    I recently bought the ThinkPad P73 with the i7-9750 and Quadro RTX 3000
    However I am still trying to decide whether to keep it or to return it as I have not even opened the box yet I still have a few days to decide, the reason I read a few reviews stating lacklustre cooling and overall just a few issues with the CPU and GPU during intensive use getting power starved limiting the CPU to 30W TDP when the GPU is at 100% utilisation.

    Here are the most in-depth reviews I could find:
    https://www.ultrabookreview.com/33057-lenovo-thinkpad-p73-review/
    https://next.lab501.ro/notebook/review-lenovo-thinkpad-p73-core-i9-9880h-quadro-rtx-4000

    The RTX 3000 in the P73 seems to be non-Max-Q and is the Max-P version.
    https://www.notebookcheck.net/NVIDIA-Quadro-RTX-3000-Laptop-Graphics-Card.423876.0.html
    https://www.videocardbenchmark.net/gpu.php?gpu=Quadro+RTX+3000&id=4119
    https://www.notebookcheck.net/GeFor...-RTX-3000-Laptop_7323_7364_9854.247598.0.html

    From early benchmarks it seems a GTX 1070 smashes the Quadro RTX 3000 quite a lot in gaming and its only professional tasks the Quadro seems to somehow creep ahead and in OpenGL they seem pretty close, for such an expensive card that supposedly is between 2060 and 2070 it performs amazingly poorly and Notebookcheck tested the RTX 3000 in the P73 so it could very much be the ThinkPad P73 at fault here holding the 3000 back substantially as it does get quite toasty easily reaching 80 to 90 degrees under load.

    Again, I like to know what the P73 owners think.
     
  2. michaelbeijer

    michaelbeijer Newbie

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    There seems to be a real lack of reviews on this laptop. I was considering getting one for work, but am now a bit worried. Am now leaning towards getting a Precision 7730 or 7740 instead.

    Michael
     
  3. DrDre

    DrDre Newbie

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    I can share you my experience with P50 and P51. I know it is not exactly same structure with P7X series, but might still help you or anyone in making decision. My P50 is with Xeon 1535 64GB ram while the P51 with i7 16GB ram. Both with quadro m2000m. Performance wise for 3D simulation (Creo, Ansys, NX) and photo editing (lightroom, photoshop,illustrator) are way smoother and faster on my P50.
    Another big difference between these two is my P51 run hotter than my P50 under heavy load (about 10 to 20 degree Celsius). Might be the very reason that my P51's motherboard got burnt and stop functioning all together. Gaming wise, these laptops have to work very hard to run games such as Starcraft 2 at high setting. Heck, even Transistor can overheat these laptops. My MSI GE62 with 970 works way better than these two on gaming. So in my opinion, get Xeon Quadro combo if you really need it, or might as well stay away from this P series altogether.
     
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  4. nukke

    nukke Notebook Enthusiast

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    The RTX 3000 (non Max-Q) is worse in every way compared to a typical mobile GTX 1070 (non Max-Q). It only makes sense it'll get destroyed in every benchmark that does not heavily use RTX features. What's surprising is how bad thermal performance is seeing as to how TDP is limited to 90W for the 3000. Seems like a repaste is a must.
     
  5. SMGJohn

    SMGJohn Notebook Evangelist

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    1070 is better for sure imao, but it seems to be a mix of bag with the RTX 3000, its like an AMD GPU, its worse in some but comparable in others and in a few its better.
    https://www.notebookcheck.net/GeFor...-RTX-3000-Laptop_9581_7364_9854.247598.0.html

    I assume the RTX 3000 would be neck to neck with an AVG 120W GTX 1070 if it had game optimisation drivers but 150W 1070? No way, the Quadro would be left in the dust as shown in some of these benchmarks.
     
  6. nukke

    nukke Notebook Enthusiast

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    Yeah, it does sound like the gap would close significantly. However, looking at those reviews, the GPU seems to be reaching 80C as it is. Assuming you could flash a 100+W VBIOS on it, plus repaste it with either Kryonaut or liquid metal, I think it would still underperform when compared to a 1070 in a beefy gaming laptop.
     
  7. SMGJohn

    SMGJohn Notebook Evangelist

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    I frankly do not understand how Lenovo could screw up the cooling system on the P53 much less the P73 when they are very large machines, larger than some gaming thin and light these days and it bothers me when they have better temperatures on 2060 and the same CPU but ThinkPad with its thicker chassis does not.
    Something very wrong with the cooling design in laptops recently and Lenovo is joining those ranks perfectly.
    The P53 and P73 share same cooling solution found on P52 and P72, the issue here is CPU only has one pipe which is also shared with the GPU (facepalm) and the GPU has 2 pipes and the third one which is the CPU pipe, so already here we can see the issue, GPU gets hot so will the CPU, but if CPU gets really hot then GPU will too, because after all shared pipes sound all good in theory, never works out in practise unless there is a whole lot of them.
    Lenovo_ThinkPad_P53_3.jpg cooling.jpg
     
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  8. nukke

    nukke Notebook Enthusiast

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    Yes, I completely agree. For as overengineered as their chassis are in terms of features, with things like keyboard cage that's spill-proof, REALLY resistant carbon material, and usually really great batteries, they use ONE heatpipe for the CPU and ONE heatpipe for the GPU. In 2019. What is Lenovo thinking?! This is completely unacceptable.

    If you look at the user manual for the P73, on page 95 you can see that they're using two heatpipes for the GPU and one for the CPU. I think the Razer Blades have 4 heatpipes and they're way lighter than the P-series. What gives?
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2019
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  9. SMGJohn

    SMGJohn Notebook Evangelist

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    ThinkPads have in general never had great GPU performance but at least their older machines could cool i7 extreme edition.
    Its really nothing but laziness and sadly that is a trend for a lot of companies, even Clevo and their cheap soldered gaming laptops which also have nasty cooling but awful build quality.

    Sent fra min SM-G970F via Tapatalk
     
  10. jack574

    jack574 Notebook Guru

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    What did you decide in the end? I've just ordered a P73 with i7 and RTX3000.

    From this review https://www.ultrabookreview.com/33057-lenovo-thinkpad-p73-review/

    it seems that the i7/RTX3000 configuration should be ok in terms of heat. Sounds like it's more the i9/RTX4000 and upwards that would suffer.

    Thanks
     
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