Lenovo Legion 5 (Ryzen 7 4800H) (Geforce 1660Ti) Thermal Issue

Discussion in 'Lenovo' started by Phoenix, Sep 16, 2021.

  1. Phoenix

    Phoenix Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hi guys, I re-pasted my Legion 5 and now I'm getting even worse scores on Cinebench R23.

    Initially, I was scoring 11327 stock thermal paste, now I'm scoring 10310 after re-paste?

    I used Arctic MX-4... surely this paste is better than what they apply by default?

    Why am I scoring nearly 1000 points less after re-pasting?

    What am I doing wrong?

    I've tried re-seating and re-pasting the heat sink at least 5 or 6 different times and it's always the same result.

    There's no way the generic paste is better than MX4 or am I missing something?

    I am regretting re-pasting, I feel like my machine is busted now, not to mention I broke 2 plastic clips trying to get the back cover off even though I was extremely gentle.

    Does anyone have any good advice on how to get my machine performing like it was out of the box?
     
  2. Tenoroon

    Tenoroon Notebook Evangelist

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    Well, it would be best for you to check CPU temps whenever you are running R23, and see if there's any thermal throttling going on.

    I would assume its the MX4. I used to use MX4 to re-paste laptops, and its good for the first few days and then goes to crap as it is a very light, liquidy paste. If you want some reliable paste that is very viscous and won't move around too much, I would recommend Thermalright TFX or Phobya Nanogrease.
     
  3. Phoenix

    Phoenix Notebook Enthusiast

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    It's definitely thermal throttling! I'm reaching temps up into 100C.

    With stock paste, I was getting around 96C and I don't think my cpu was throttling in cinebench.
     
  4. Tenoroon

    Tenoroon Notebook Evangelist

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    Yeah, the stock paste probably wasn't good, but it was firm, and it ensured contact between the CPU die and the heatsink, unlike your MX-4 right now. Again, I'd recommend buying one of the 2 pastes I told you about, and if you are really paranoid, just go with TFX, I've used it in some pretty crappy heatsink contact laptops and it helps out a lot.
     
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  5. Spring1898

    Spring1898 Notebook Consultant

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    Contrary to tenoroon's experience, my experience with MX-4 has been perfectly normal.

    If you are truly getting worse temps, I would be concerned with how you are applying the paste and reapplying the heat sink
     
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  6. laptopnoob678

    laptopnoob678 Notebook Consultant

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    Had the same issue re-pasting with MX-4.

    I have some Kryonaut but I thought that was even worse for laptops and longevity. Should I re-paste with that or buy something more solid?

    I spread the paste as well as opposed to using a bit in the middle as it's being applied to the die and not a lid. Is that wrong?
     
  7. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    The grain of rice in the middle is the best way to do it. Let the pressure of the heatsink spread the paste.
     
  8. laptopnoob678

    laptopnoob678 Notebook Consultant

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    Even on direct die applications?

    My concern is just that MX-4 is not viscous enough
     
  9. KING19

    KING19 Notebook Deity

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    Personally the line method works better for AMD CPUs because of the bigger dye. Im getting better temps than the first time i repasted with the rice grain method.
     
  10. Spring1898

    Spring1898 Notebook Consultant

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    Viscosity has nothing to do with the conductivity or effectiveness of the thermal paste, only how easily it spreads on initial pressure/application. Not sure where that idea comes from.
    Some people have gone to great lengths in the past to try and decrease viscosity by heating up the paste such as putting the tube in a plastic bag and setting it in warm water for a bit, to make it spread better initially.

    From experience and repasting multiple systems, especially the same systems multiple times, I can assure you that this has absolutely no effect on the end result, and that if there is enough paste to cover the die, it will. Sometimes it will take a couple heat cycles to get to the very edge if you were particularly skimpy with the paste, but it has also been proven that 'too much' paste doesn't negatively affect temperatures either. If you live in a very cold climate and the paste is too thick, then just put it in a pocket for a few minutes before you need it.

    I use whichever method is appropriate to the shape of the die; long skinny die, like old intel dies, long skinny line. Square die, dot in the middle. Whatever pattern you apply it will squish into a circle at the end anyway. Whether it is a bare die or not, it makes no difference. You can just get away with less paste on a bare die.


    Have the people having issue ever repasted a CPU before? Because I would be more suspect of the application/reapplication method, or that you may have gotten a counterfeit product.
    You may want to explain how exactly you are doing, to ensure there is nothing you are doing wrong in the method as that is the easiest to troubleshoot. Even a generic real product should not have abnormally worse performance than stock if applied correctly.

    The first poster mentioned applying paste to the heatsink. I don't know if he misspoke or was actually applying the thermal paste to the heatsink, the die, or both. Don't do that.

    For Example:
    1. remove heat sink from die
    2. clean off heat sink and dies from all old paste (may use alcohol and tissue, or cloth, or paper towel)
    3. apply appropriate amount of thermal paste to cpu/gpu die
    4. line-up heatsink and place directly down (no sliding) and torque screws in order, half turn at a time to ensure even application of pressure.
    5. retest temperatures (before you put the back plate on the laptop if you are not sure if you did it right)



    Some issues (don't laugh, I have seen all this, and some people just don't know)
    1. not cleaning off paste from heatsink also, only die,
    2. sliding heatsink around over die so all thermal paste is scraped off.
    3. torqueing down one screw completely at a time (unless you have constant pressure on the die) resulting in the heatsink getting torqued down one side at a time pushing out the thermal paste.
    4. taking off and putting back on the heatsink without changing the paste after checking it spread right, (doing so causes bubbles to form and air is not a good conductor, it is insulator).
    5. misaligning heatsink so it does not make contact with the die
    6. misaligning thermal pads so heatsink does not make contact with die
    7. using not enough paste
    8. using way too much paste
    9. applying paste to both heatsink and die (only put it on the die)
    10. not taking any paste off anything and just putting new paste onto old paste and putting heatsink back on
    That is all I could think of off the top of my head
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2021
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