Lenovo Legion 5/5 Pro/7 2021 Discussion

Discussion in 'Lenovo' started by saturnotaku, May 21, 2021.

  1. sk3tch

    sk3tch Notebook Deity

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    That is awesome! Better results than my i9 laptop. My CPU got like a tiny bit better results but it doesn't even matter.

    Yeah I have heard nothing but bad things about that Mediatek one. That was the big thing that dissuaded me from the AMD build.
     
  2. Terreos

    Terreos Royal Guard

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    It's an easy swap though. Stinks you have to buy one right out of the box, but again not difficult. I'll upgrade my ram while I'm in there too just for some piece of mind. Right now the wifi seems to be holding good. However I'm in the same room as the router. So it seems as soon as you get any range away from the router it starts acting up.

    Right now I'm looking to either disable or uninstall icue so I don't have to deal with that draining my battery when I'm off the wall charger. The plain cyan color actually looks nice. So I'm just gonna stick with that.
     
  3. sk3tch

    sk3tch Notebook Deity

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    Nice. I disabled it and haven't looked back!
     
  4. GMLP

    GMLP Notebook Consultant

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    To those struggling to open the bottom panel on the Legion 7, don’t waste time breaking your picks or scratching the anodised aluminium. I used a pair of cheap polyco work gloves (see link below if you’re in Australia, otherwise search Amazon) for extra grip and carefully pushed down on either one of the side vents after removing all screws. From then on you can slowly work your way around unlatching the panel.

    https://www.werko.com.au/product/kn...293F1hwLV9lndL6fYYL5vOcfEZ3DrBm8aAmAHEALw_wcB
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2021
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  5. jlp0209

    jlp0209 Notebook Evangelist

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    Now that I've had the chance to actually use the 7i for work and some games, I have to say this is my favorite laptop I've ever owned. Definitely glad I went with the 3080 since my favorite games are F1 and Forza Horizon, I'll take all the frames I can get. Temps are great and there's no need to undervolt the CPU. No BS TCC offset like my Alienware laptop that will be going back. And the screen, it's been beaten to death, is among the best I've ever used on a laptop.

    My laptop carousel is finally over and I can comfortably sell off my desktop and go laptop only (for now, haha). It's all thanks to my wife who spilled coffee on my Asus G14. Had that not happened I'd never have considered going with alternatives or larger laptops.
     
  6. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Figured I'd throw in my $0.02 about the Legion 7i after having a chance to use it over the holiday weekend. Overall, it's doing everything I could ask for in a gaming laptop while being a step-up in feel and build quality from most other models I've purchased and subsequently gotten rid of, including the Legion 5 Pro that I foolishly sold a few months ago. Note that my model is the i7 11800H with RTX 3070 and 1 TB SSD. The RAM was upgraded from 16 GB x16 to 32 GB x8.

    The Great
    • The screen. Spec wise, the resolution, aspect ratio, and refresh rate are just about perfect for both gaming and productivity. The panel in my specific unit is basically flawless when it comes to backlight bleed. It's the best of any matte and/or high-refresh display on a Windows-based laptop I've ever used and probably ranks 3rd among all notebooks for overall quality behind the M1 MacBook Air and Pro and Dell XPS 17.
    • The form factor and port layout. It strikes the right balance between the screen real estate you'd get on a larger 17-inch laptop with the portability afforded to a 15-inch. Having most of the connectivity on the back is a huge convenience, as are the backlit port labels.
    • The thermals. Truly outstanding, at least on my unit. Idle temperatures are typically in the mid-30s for both the CPU and GPU. In performance mode, the CPU will hit peaks of around 85C but only for a moment when it hits a burst frequency of 4.6 GHz. It then settles down to the mid-70s with sustained clock frequencies of 4.0-4.1 GHz. The GPU doesn't go above 65C while running Furmark or Timespy. It got 98.9% in the 3DMark stress test, which is exceptional for a system that was not tweaked using ThrottleStop or Afterburner.
    • The performance. While I haven't played many games on it, the RTX 3070 has handled everything I've thrown at it with aplomb. Were this my only computer, I would have probably gone with the 3080, but as a supplement to a powerful desktop, I couldn't ask for anything more. The flexibility to choose between full dGPU mode with G-Sync or Advanced Optimus is such a great value-add for the consumer. PCI-Express Gen 4 is also the upgrade I never knew I needed. The stock 1 TB Samsung SSD Lenovo shipped on mine is blazing fast.
    • The value for money. This is with the assumption that you get one while it's on sale, which fortunately seems to happen often. Utilizing a pair of stackable coupon codes and Rakuten cash back, my i7/3070 configuration was a bit more than $1900 out the door, including 2-year accidental damage warranty, tax, and overnight shipping.
    The Good
    • The keyboard. I'm very heavy handed when I type, and the key travel on the L7 feels ever so slightly shorter than on the L5. This results in a slightly harsher bottom-out sensation. The metal deck gets warmer under load than on the all-plastic L5, but it's never uncomfortable. It's a very good keyboard, don't get me wrong, though Asus is still the best in the business, IMO.
    • The trackpad. Feels nice for a gaming laptop. Better than the plastic Legion 5, but not quite as good as the Dell XPS, Razer Blade, or most Asus Zephyrus variants. There's occasional palm rejection issues, but they are nowhere near as bad as the Legion 5 or 5 Pro.
    • The fan behavior and acoustics. I was most worried about this aspect of the laptop given Tiger Lake H seems to run hotter than Ryzen 5000. The L7 has been a pleasant surprise. I experience high-pitched whistle under load, but after testing other laptops, I'm convinced this is a problem with my own ears. I don't hear it when performing everyday tasks that don't stress the CPU or GPU. Idle fan behavior is on the better end of the gaming laptop spectrum. They do spin up from time to time when performing light-duty tasks, but it's not even close to being as frequent or annoying as on other models I've used (looking at you, every Tongfang laptop ever).
    The Mediocre
    • The battery life. This is more of an Intel problem than a Legion 7 one. Best I can manage is 4-5 hours of browsing, watching YouTube, and office work with the screen at 50% brightness and keyboard lighting disabled. My AMD-based Legion 5 Pro could easily manage 7-8 hours performing the same tasks. At least Type-C charging is supported.
    • The accessibility. While it's great that you can upgrade the RAM, storage, and WiFi, the bottom panel design makes it much harder to get to these parts than necessary. It's not a matter of if you'll break a retention clip or two, but when.
    • The x16 memory. Sucks that this is still a thing, but performance isn't hampered by it as much on Intel platforms as it is on AMD. For the most part, I'm seeing 5% or less performance improvement using my CL22 x8 RAM. I could realize more gains with faster CL20 stuff, but I'm not interested in spending the money for it right now, at least not until there's confirmation of a rumored XMP-enabled BIOS for these machines.
    • The missing fn+R shortcut. Apparently the ability to change the refresh rate from 165 to 60 Hz via fn+R does not work on Intel-based Legion models. This is despite the R key being highlighted when you press fn to see all the other combinations. I've read several complaints on Lenovo's support forum, but someone who is apparently a BIOS engineer said it's just not available. It's not the end of the world, but this was a really nice convenience on my AMD-based Legion laptops.
    The bad
    • The iCue integration. Corsair and Lenovo share equal responsibility here, with neither company appearing particularly interested in fixing the problems that have plagued the Legion 7 line for the past two years and counting. Yes, you can disable or uninstall it, and the built-in lighting effects are decent enough. However, this should not be necessary. For the next-generation Legion flagship, Lenovo needs to either partner with a different company (my vote would be Logitech) or bring per-key RGB control in-house, integrating it into the Vantage software.
    • The power brick. I appreciate Lenovo providing a more-than-adequate AC adapter in the box, but there has to be a way for them to slim it down as the comically large size makes it a pain to lug around the house or to take on the road.
     
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  7. Terreos

    Terreos Royal Guard

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    I’ll keep this in mind when I pop mine open. Gotta swap out the Wi-Fi card and I’ll swap the stock ram with my Hyper X kit. Mostly because I can. I’m not expecting anything amazing to change with that upgrade. Thermals seems solid so I’ll let any repasting go until it’s time to open it up again to clean it. Hopefully I don’t snap any clips.
     
  8. Aquineas

    Aquineas Newbie

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    Alright folks, I ordered a pair of Legion 7 Slim Gen 6's for my two oldest; I'd previously ordered Legion 5's but returned them to get the 3060s (yeah, I know it's not as powerful as the 3070, but my kids aren't at the point where they need ultra-powerful just yet). In any case, I went elsewhere to order Windows 11 Pro and MS Office , and I'd gone to the Lenovo site to download all the drivers I'll need for a fresh install. Well, keep reading, because while on the Lenovo site, I got a pop-up ad for another $100 off, that looks stackable with the other deals. This is probably only good for today (11/30/2021), but here it is just in case.

    TL;DR
    That $100 off code is:
    HOLIDAYSURPRISE


    Now, where can I download all the drivers I'll need for a fresh install on a Legion 7 Slim Gen 6?
     
  9. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    The code has been valid for a few days as I posted about it on the previous page.

    This is not necessary as Lenovo's Windows installs are much cleaner than most OEMs. The only software I get rid of is McAfee, which does uninstall without leaving anything behind when you check the option to do a complete removal.
     
  10. jlp0209

    jlp0209 Notebook Evangelist

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    Nice, they'll enjoy those laptops!

    Here is the Lenovo driver page for your models, I believe. If not, just go to Lenovo's support site and enter in the model number or serial number when you receive them and the drivers page should come up automatically.

    https://pcsupport.lenovo.com/us/en/...series/legion-s7-15ach6/downloads/driver-list
     
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