Legion 5, 5 thermal pastes tested.

Discussion in 'Lenovo' started by Phoenix, Nov 14, 2021.

  1. Phoenix

    Phoenix Notebook Enthusiast

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    I do not recommend that you re-paste your Legion 5 at all unless you are having thermal issues.

    (Edit) Apparently, after much research, the best kind of TIM to use for these laptops is Honeywell PTM7950.(Stock) It's just what these machines are designed to use.

    I deleted my testing results on all pastes because they all eventually had the same result on this machine. (Pumpout issues) All of the pastes I tried were of high quality and extremely good however, you're going to need to use Honeywell PTM7950 pre-cured sheets which is the stock paste for these laptops.

    Did tons of research and testing and this is the conclusion I have came to.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2021
    dmanti, KING19, Vasudev and 1 other person like this.
  2. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Deity

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    While not a paste these work well.


    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08BL3SCWH

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The lowest temps "idle' w/ fans @ 100%
    [​IMG]

    I haven't OC/UV anything on this machine at this point and can squeeze out 4Ghz out of a possible 4.5Ghz on the CPU
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Phoenix

    Phoenix Notebook Enthusiast

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    Thanks for posting! I was considering trying those but I couldn't find much information about how they worked on a laptop. Might have to try them.
     
  4. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Deity

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    I took them and put them over the die and marked the x/y edges with my fingernail and then trimmed them. A single pad could potentially cover 3 CPU/GPU pairs. They're slippery as hell though so you'll need to hold onto them while placing the HS back on or at least until you're close to having it on. I set 1 tab of the pad on the die and slightly moved the laptop and it slid off and 1/4 way down the board under the RAM. Might recommend using tweezers to hold them. Some mentioned using a small drop of isopropyl to tac them to the die while reassembling. Shouldn't be too much of an issue though on a non-lap surface that doesn't move.

    If you don't want to measure them for an exact fit I would say cutting the thing into 1/4's would suffice for fitment.
     
  5. Phoenix

    Phoenix Notebook Enthusiast

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    I will definitely try those out if the SYY-157 on my chips end up pumping out.

    But everything seems to be running good, fingers crossed.

    At least with pads you don't have to worry about pump-out issues. I had a hell of a time trying to find the right paste for my laptop... It was a very stressful journey.
     
  6. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Deity

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    I've had decent pastes and horrible pastes that went to hell in 4 days time to temps over 100C on the CPU with nothing running. I decided to rebuild my server though for Alder Lake from the ground up and sell the existing one when I'm done moving the HDD's over. so, I ordered a 2-pack of the pads and cannibalized one of them for the laptop as intended. They do act differently compared to pastes though in the laptop at least. Seems like they're a bit slower to trigger the fans to ramp up but, once they do kick in the temps recover fairly quickly. The main goal though is to keep the temps more consistent and less fans running @ 90-100%. The Antec paste was holding up pretty well and was still tacky to the touch after running for 11 months 24/7. Didn't need to do this but, wanted to see if it would improve things a bit or at least be the same. Since these things don't degrade over time like a paste it should be a once and done situation. Maybe twice and done if you play with the idea of double layering them on the dies. Not too sure if the thickness of a double layer would impede the transfer or not. Ran into some issues with a thick pasting job where it hindered more than helped.

    I wasn't really expecting the significant bump in the CPU either. I guess I didn't really think much of it running at 3-3.25 before. Not sure why it's rated at a max of 4.5Ghz and only showing a baseline of 2.6Ghz, that's Intel for you though on Windows. Clocking the CPU speed wasn't the priority when I picked this thing up anyway, it was the dual NVME slots.
     
  7. N2ishun

    N2ishun Notebook Evangelist

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    Bummer dude.
    I musta won the silicone lottery, easily able to boost to 5.0ghz (out of 5.1)
    System in sig line.
    Still on factory paste (whatever Clevo uses) and never seen a reason to mess with it.
    System uptime is at least 12 hours as of this moment of taking the screenshot.
    fans.jpg
     
  8. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Deity

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    @N2ishun

    We've basically have the same HW / Case here. I'm running on a NP6855 / 9750H which shouldn't be much different than a 10875H. Maybe internally something is quite a bit different since I'm running a GTX1650 and you're on a RTX which probably means there's a different cooling setup as well as board arrangement. However, if you search for mine on here you would probably only find my postings about it regarding the screen upgrade I did on it.

    The only time I see numbers like yours though is if I shutdown for an hour and let things cool down and that doesn't last long after turning it back on. It might be the lottery it might be the generation of the release it it could be the board layout or the HS. The paste from the factory didn't seem to be the best in my case or I thought I could get it better than what it was doing. However I'm 60 hours into these pads and as expected they're holding their own. For a $740 laptop though it's decent enough for the things I need it to do on a daily basis.

    My server on the other hand is where I put more investment. Totally different beast to work with in capabilities and performance. Current build is running on 8700K and the rebuild is going to be 12700K. I might sink some more cash into the 12700H if it ups the tech like the K version. It's hard to say what the new releases and bundled HW in laptops will look like and cost though.
     
  9. RogerF81

    RogerF81 Newbie

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    Btw which program ("Fan Speed Setting") is this exactly? Does this work only on the non-pro L5?
     
  10. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Deity

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    It's a Clevo and all the other names they're sold under app. Might work on a Legion but, not sure. Never tried wen I had my Y720.

    https://repo.palkeo.com/clevo-mirror/ UN/PW: repo

    It can be found there under most any model listed as control center. It basically adds a DOS applet that gives you control over the fans.
     
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