Laptop Screen Upgrades

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by sicily428, Apr 27, 2018.

  1. t456

    t456 1977-09-05, 12:56:00 UTC

    Reputations:
    1,959
    Messages:
    2,588
    Likes Received:
    2,048
    Trophy Points:
    181
    Well ... no, all of four them need to move:
    Code:
    4  -> 18-21
    6  -> 34
    7  -> 35
    10 -> 23-26
    The 'high-speed grounds' might work too, depending on whether they're hooked up on a combined circuit, but the regular control grounds will definitively do and since you're swapping them around anyway it's best to simply hedge against a make-over.
     
  2. dglt

    dglt Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    12
    Messages:
    131
    Likes Received:
    44
    Trophy Points:
    41
    ok, that makes much more sense. thanks again, i'll solder those up in the morning and give it another shot. sorry to keep picking your brain but do i need to be concerned with write protection and if i do run into that issue i would just ground the WP pin on the chip while writing?
     
  3. dglt

    dglt Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    12
    Messages:
    131
    Likes Received:
    44
    Trophy Points:
    41
    i keep getting overvoltage detected and read fails, i tried from the ZIF socket the way the cable was meant to be used, i also tried using ICSP but get no read, i tried swapping the 2 data cables (red/black) but same result, the overvoltage error happens when only leaving the VCC power/ground connected so the problem is there i believe.
    Resoldered plug:
    upload_2021-1-12_13-21-50.png

    Bad pins found/overvoltage error:
    upload_2021-1-12_13-22-51.png
     
  4. dglt

    dglt Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    12
    Messages:
    131
    Likes Received:
    44
    Trophy Points:
    41
    fixed pin detection by soldering wires directly to the 3 pads next to each other labeled data, clk, gnd. and im supplying power via the single wire soldered to pin #20 on the edp plug and running each wire to soic8 blank board plugged into the zif socket and i have pins 1,2,3,4 bridged as the chip layout calls for

    upload_2021-1-12_15-4-17.png
    upload_2021-1-12_15-5-5.png

    i tried a few different VCC pins between
     
  5. t456

    t456 1977-09-05, 12:56:00 UTC

    Reputations:
    1,959
    Messages:
    2,588
    Likes Received:
    2,048
    Trophy Points:
    181
    Ok, so it's working now then?

    If not; the Atmel is still a guess and pin-out can differ between eeprom models and the overvoltage error makes sense if the wrong pin is getting power. Same if the programmer is running on 5V instead of 3.3V (straight USB voltage rather than using a buck converter). If you can make out the markings of the eeprom then that'd simplify things bit.

    Btw, what was the reason for flashing a different edid?
     
  6. dglt

    dglt Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    12
    Messages:
    131
    Likes Received:
    44
    Trophy Points:
    41
    ive been at it again today for hours, i dont think this uses an A24C02 chip. i've been probing around looking for a chip that uses the A24C02 pin layout (from all the ones i looked at on Xgpro the layout of pins seem the same. i took a bunch of pictures as best i could, if you have a minute to look at them to see if you can spot the chip i would greatly appreciate your input.

    https://imgur.com/a/fMHZR3y

    as for the reason, this panel is not technically a g-sync panel but i have it working as one in linux because i can specify an edid override with an edid i put together and it works awesome but on windows its a lot more complicated and i already grabbed the bios modules from a gsync legion 7i and injected them into my bios, i need the edid to match and read as a different model in order to go any further with forcing g-sync on windows (a fools errand, yet here i am) :confused:

    Edit: since i already found the data, clk, gnd pins and later i found the wp pad, all i should need is to find the right vcc pad and i should be good to go but i cant seem to spot which vcc pad is the right one and using pins 18-21 on the edp connector is not working out
     
  7. t456

    t456 1977-09-05, 12:56:00 UTC

    Reputations:
    1,959
    Messages:
    2,588
    Likes Received:
    2,048
    Trophy Points:
    181
    Can't see all of the pcb, but the 8-pin in the middle is your best bet. Google the scribbles +pdf and you should have the pin-out. That will then tell you which is vcc and which is ground. Trace them back to the exposed connection pads and solder the wire to those. The pads were used in the factory to program the chip during manufacturing. if they duck behind the board then use a multimeter between the eeprom pin and the pad you want to test.

    On the right side I can make out TCON_TEST' and 'WP', so guess you'd find the data, clock and voltage pads nearby.
     
  8. dglt

    dglt Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    12
    Messages:
    131
    Likes Received:
    44
    Trophy Points:
    41
    i did put a meter on the 8 pin chip, the pads for data, clk, and wp dont show continuity when i test each of the pins to each of those pads. what did you mean by google the "scribbles". i tried searching for the board but came up empty, same for that 8pin chip
     
  9. dglt

    dglt Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    12
    Messages:
    131
    Likes Received:
    44
    Trophy Points:
    41
    i have another idea, if i was to solder a lead from WP to GND i should be able to write edid over i2c right?

    edit: didnt work

    edit2: the markings on this chip read 2L946 0E29B6
    upload_2021-1-13_23-10-47.png
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2021
  10. t456

    t456 1977-09-05, 12:56:00 UTC

    Reputations:
    1,959
    Messages:
    2,588
    Likes Received:
    2,048
    Trophy Points:
    181
    There's no other 8-pin chip on the board?

    The edid eeprom is mostly a TSSOP8 type, but it is possible to use the controller chip instead to store that bit of data. Never seen such an example before, though. Could search that particular chip and check whether it indeed has I2C pins and a small storage option.
     
Loading...

Share This Page