Kingspec SSD, are they any good?

Discussion in 'Panasonic' started by rtreads, Jan 23, 2011.

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  1. Squeeto

    Squeeto Newbie

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  2. orange_george

    orange_george Notebook Evangelist

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    @Squeeto;

    Those drives use a 40 pin connector plus 4 pins for master/slave selection resulting in 44 pins, which CAN be misleading, they do NOT fit a 44 pin connector!

    Your 44 pin connector plus 4 pins for master/slave selection gives 48 pins, which CAN be misleading, they DO fit a 44 pin connector.

    Are you "On The Ball" or is it misleading??

    o.g.
     
  3. Squeeto

    Squeeto Newbie

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    They say it is a 40 pin but count the pins on the drive in the picture, 44 + 4!
    Unless they took a picture of a standard 44 + 4 and photoshopped their own label on it. But who would do this? I am thinking that marketing got it wrong and are just slapping their label on someone elses oem product.
     
  4. Squeeto

    Squeeto Newbie

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    Problem has been fixed.
    MyDigitalSSD drives are now stated as 44 pin.

    I have ordered one. Let me know if you want a benchmark test and what software to use.
     
  5. orange_george

    orange_george Notebook Evangelist

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    In the words of a famous tv sports pundit: "You Cannot Be Serious Man!"

    Yesterday, the product label & the item description said 40 pin, after receiving your e-mail it's all changed to 44 pin. :eek: :eek: must be one of those; have a go, if we get it wrong, we'll try again moments. :D :D

    This time tomorrow they will have re-branded them; "My Mickey Mouse SSD" :D :D Buy One....Get One Free lol.

    I'm not trying to put a downer on this, but, the comments of others who have "Been There" are:

    The options in Pata form are comparatively limited & expensive, hence the earlier invitation to those with Pata SLC drives to tune in with an update on their performance....said the dumb man to his deaf sister!

    @Squeeto, tune in when your new baby arrives, we'll run a couple of benchmarks trying not to st..st..stutter as we do it. If you can open the case & identify the nand flash & controller all the better.

    o.g.
     
  6. eboyhan

    eboyhan Newbie

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    Let me make a few points about PATA SSDs. Many SSDs with IDE interfaces are first generation products when the details of how SSDs work (especially how they do writes) was not well understood.

    Most who are looking for IDE SSDs want to upgrade older laptops where physical space in the drive bay is at a premium and SATA/PATA adapters won't fit (as is possible in desktops). Most are doing this to replace laptop boot drives. The IO pattern is likely to be lots of smaller reads and writes. If you look at benchmarks, pay especial attention to random 4K reads/writes -- you won't be doing too many larger sized IO's (nor too much sequential stuff) -- so don't be dazzled by the high performance of large block IOs. Also don't pay a lot of attention to quoted aggregate IO bandwidths in excess of 50MB for read and writes. IDE interface limitations mean you can't realistically expect to get above 50MB.

    You are doing the conversion to an SSD because the average access times (latency + track to track access) are effectively zero. For even very fast 7200 rpm HDDs these times are going to be in the 10ms to 20ms range -- these access times far outweigh IO transfer times -- so SSDs (even with slow transfer times) will appear blazingly fast compared to HDDs when doing boot drive/OS IO patterns.

    All that being said, the first generation products tended to have really bad performance degradation the more they were used -- this was due mostly to imperfect understandings of how an SSD does writes. Early controllers (especially the Jmicron one) were very bad with this. The Indilynx first gen controller was pretty good, and the Sandforce controllers are superb. If you can get controller info (vendors are loath to provide this info) go with Sandforce or Indilynx. I have used Runcore SSDs with Indilynx controllers -- they seem ok.

    Any SSD right after installation will seem really great. The real test is whether the performance is maintained for month after month of hard use. Putting an SSD drive in and using it for a few days and reporting great results is often misleading. Either lengthy use or special "heavy wear write" benchmarks are necessary to accurately evaluate an SSD. Sites such as Tom's hardware do a really good job with this -- unfortunately they only test SATA drives because that's where the market is.
     
  7. Squeeto

    Squeeto Newbie

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    Drive came:
    [​IMG]
    The label (sticker) still says 40 pin though.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This is tested on XP with an AMD Athlon 64, 3000+.

    How does this compare to the RunCore?
     
  8. Alex

    Alex Super Moderator

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  9. Squeeto

    Squeeto Newbie

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    The real issue seems to be that I haven't been able to get the drive out of DMA mode 2.
     
  10. John Hawk

    John Hawk Notebook Enthusiast

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    Yesterday I read a report at Toms Hardware that covered the relability of SSDs from an industry viewpoint - the concensus was that the only game in town were Intel SLC SSDs. One manager of a server farm had to return 5 out of 20 of a delivery as being defective, and Kingspec could have been the makers, but I can't swear that I remember correctly. However, that would seem to be bear out the experiences of a previous poster vis-a-vis the reliability of Kingspec SSDs.
    The report didn't deal with speed, but as reliability is still so variable with these comparatively new devices, I'd rather have a slow SSD that kept working than a hot device that only lasted a month.
     
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