K53TA.. The best deal ever... could be!

Discussion in 'Asus' started by UnXpectedError, Aug 8, 2011.

  1. ryanlecocq

    ryanlecocq Notebook Consultant

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    By that do you mean what version of windows? If you're talking Windows 8, I would say stay with 7, even if you like the metro interface. Drivers are immature and you will get universally 2-3 fps lower with every game. If you mean Windows 7 Home Professional, that will be fine as that's what comes on it. I run a custom Windows 7 install that has all of the unnecessary features removed to save space (not starter, custom made). I just do that because I use a small SSD only on my k53ta. If you're using the stock 500gb that little bit of difference won't matter.
     
  2. dchinu

    dchinu Notebook Geek

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    Bumped and Knocked on the corner albeit in the carry bag Still 3 Screw-hole around the left hinge gave up :no: had to Do a Tear down clean up.
    Still Runs like a Champ but Word of Caution : Don't move around with this machine..
     
  3. DropTheBomb

    DropTheBomb Notebook Enthusiast

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    Yes, i ment Windows 7 haha As i said i only have access to a copy of Win 7 Pro rather then home and just wanted to double check if its fine to use that instead since i really wanna get rid of all the bloatware and what not

    Really? that sucks, ive used my k53ta for university for already 2 years and ive been moving this guy everywhere and its still strong
     
  4. Popeye-K53TA

    Popeye-K53TA Notebook Guru

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    me too, every day at work, nothing broken yet
     
  5. matis1985

    matis1985 Newbie

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    hello everyone. I've got a problem with my x53ta everytime when i use k10stat and overclock my amd a6 my laptop wont shutdown- it's stuck on the shutting down screen. When i used Ubuntu i didn't overclock my processor but this problem was still there- no shutdown. My laptop was 4 times in service- they changed hdd, led screen, they tested it rof two weeks and they said that my laptop works fine but it isn't. Every use of k10stat or fusion tweaker = no shutdown. Maybe someone know the solution for my problem? please help me
     
  6. OdU_Geek

    OdU_Geek Notebook Consultant

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    Are you saying that it shut down fine before you overclocked for the first time? And ever since you overclocked it won't shut down, regardless of OS? When you tried Ubuntu, was it on the same hard drive, or did you have it on a separate hard drive?
     
  7. Gintoki

    Gintoki Notebook Prophet

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    ..........
     
  8. matis1985

    matis1985 Newbie

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    I own this laptop for over a year and this problem happend for the first time i february this year. I overclocked apu to 2ghz only for games specially for diablo 3. Temps were around 66-69. Now after playing diablo at 2ghz laptop wont shutdown. I tried ubuntu after cleaning the whole hdd and the problem was still there.
     
  9. OdU_Geek

    OdU_Geek Notebook Consultant

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    Finally got around to overclocking/undervolting this laptop on Linux. I was using Linux Mint 14 Cinnamon. I changed P-state values using a program called k10ctl, then used a Cinnamon applet to select my P-state. Unfortunately, this method can only change P-states 0 and 2-4, and not 1,5,6 (1 will look like it's changed, but has no effect). This is probably fixable, but I haven't looked into it yet.

    Disclaimer: As always, if you don't know what you're doing, performing this operation may result in damaging your hardware, and I am not responsible for your actions or mistakes. By attempting this operation, you take full responsibility for any damage incurred to your hardware and resulting void of warranty (if you still have one...).

    Overclocking/Undervolting the K53TA-bbr6 in Linux

    First, if you have K10stat on Windows and you've previously undervolted, you can save yourself a lot of time by making a spreadsheet recording FID, DID, frequency, and voltage values.

    To save you some time:
    [​IMG]

    There are other things like northbridge values... just ignore those as we have no control over any of that. For our purposes, we only need to change the FID, DID (core frequency multipliers), and the VID (sets voltage). It should be noted that the a6-3400m uses serial VID mode, as well.

    Download k10ctl here: k10ctl
    You can either follow my instructions or follow instructions here: k10ctl
    (I recommend using a browser that translates this German page into English)

    Instructions:
    1. Download and unzip the .tar.bz2

    2. Install k10ctl:
    a. Open up a console and change to the directory where you downloaded the file to
    Code:
    //my download directory was the following:
    cd ~/Downloads/k10ctl
    b. Install k10ctl
    Code:
    sudo make install
    That command installed k10ctl to the path / usr / local / sbin

    3. Configure k10ctl
    a. load the kernal module msr
    Code:
    sudo modprobe msr
    Then append the file " / etc / modules " to load msr at boot, permanently, by opening it with an editor as root and entering msr. If you don't edit it as root, it won't save the file.
    My /etc/modules file looks like this
    Code:
    # /etc/modules: kernel modules to load at boot time.
    #
    # This file contains the names of kernel modules that should be loaded
    # at boot time, one per line. Lines beginning with "#" are ignored.
    
    lp
    rtc
    msr
    4. Now we set up our P-states. Sadly, we can not change P-states 5 or 6, and changing 1 has no effect, at this time. If you are feeling confident you have the right setup, skip ahead to section b where we get our new p-state settings to load at boot.

    a.
    to print a readout of current values type:
    Code:
    sudo k10ctl 0
    (make sure to stretch your terminal wide enough to receive the output formatted correctly)
    and you should see something like this:
    [​IMG]

    The relevant columns are CpuVid (sets voltage), CpuDid, CpuFid (core multipliers), and UCpu (tells the current voltage)

    To change your P-states, use these commands
    k10ctl commands:
    -cv (CPUVID) 0-127 changes voltage , lower cv means higher voltage by .0125 V
    -cf (CPUFID) 0-63 changes FID
    -cd (CPUDID) 0-7 changes DID
    Code:
    usage: sudo k10ctl (one or multiple cores) (pstate#) -cv (#) -cd (#) -cf (#)
    examples-  sudo k10ctl 0-3 4 -cv 74 -cf 14 -cd 5	
    sudo k10ctl 0 4 -cf 14 -cd 5
    If you know your FID, DID values for the frequencies you want to set, this shouldn't be too hard to setup. All you will have to do is incrementally move the -cv value until you reach your optimal voltage. If you need to test your voltage stability, look into using ftp://mersenne.org/gimps/mprime2414.tar.gz or ftp://mersenne.org/gimps/sprime2414-freebsd.tar.gz

    b.
    method 1: load at linux boot, we have to append the file / etc / rc.local . Edit it as root and enter your P-states in a form like this:
    Code:
    #!/bin/sh -e
    #
    # rc.local
    #
    # This script is executed at the end of each multiuser runlevel.
    # Make sure that the script will "exit 0" on success or any other
    # value on error.
    #
    # In order to enable or disable this script just change the execution
    # bits.
    #
    # By default this script does nothing.
    
    /usr/local/sbin/k10ctl 0-3 4 -cf 22 -cd 4 -cv 62
    /usr/local/sbin/k10ctl 0-3 3 -cf 22 -cd 4 -cv 62
    /usr/local/sbin/k10ctl 0-3 2 -cf 22 -cd 4 -cv 62
    # this one has no effect...
    /usr/local/sbin/k10ctl 0-3 1 -cf 22 -cd 4 -cv 62
    /usr/local/sbin/k10ctl 0-3 0 -cf 22 -cd 4 -cv 62
    
    exit 0
    Now you should be good to go.

    method 2: load at UI startup
    -do this by searching for the application "startup applications"
    1. create a new startup application. name it whatever you want
    2. enter the commands in the same form as you would in a console
    Code:
    //for example:
    k10ctl 0-3 4 -cf 22 -cd 4 -cv 62 && k10ctl 0-3 3 -cf 22 -cd 4 -cv 62 && k10ctl 0-3 2 -cf 22 -cd 4 -cv 62 && k10ctl 0-3 0 -cf 22 -cd 4 -cv 62
    //using the "&&" is just like an "and", allowing us to string together multiple commands
    If anyone has any questions, I'll try my best to help you out. I'm pretty new to Linux, though, so I may or may not be able to help you. When you get finished, I recommend downloading something that allows you to control your P-states. Since you can't change P-states 5 and 6, it'll sit at 800-950 mhz at voltages around ~.950V, so a bit high for such low frequencies. I set all my P-states to 1.4ghz and lock it to the highest.

    I wish I had taken the time to figure this out back when this laptop was popular and this thread was hoppin'. Oh well.

    Good luck! :thumbsup:
     
  10. alexbbcom

    alexbbcom Newbie

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    can upgrade memory to 16G ?
    8GBx2 BUS1333

    now i use 4G*2 bus1333 = 8g

    i want to use window 2012 and start another clinet on my vmware
     
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