Is the price difference between i7-10875h and i9-10980hk worth it?

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by AndresHdz, Jul 12, 2020.

  1. AndresHdz

    AndresHdz Notebook Guru

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    I saw they both have similar clock speeds, single core performance and in multi core performance just a 12% increase. While the price difference is $500 between models with same other components.
    Is the performance increase worth it for $500? (Heavy tasks) And why?
     
  2. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    For a theoretical 5% and 8% increase, probably not. Unless the system is used every day for 8/12/18 hours at a time to make $$$$$ for you.

    See:
    https://www.cpubenchmark.net/compare/Intel-i7-10875H-vs-Intel-i9-10980HK/3726vs3700

    If the system, in total, was in the $4K to $5K range, I would consider it if thinking/hoping I would use the system for more than ~18 months or so (again, making $$$$$ from it).

    I'm guessing though that the total cost of the platform may not be that much though?
     
  3. AndresHdz

    AndresHdz Notebook Guru

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    The i7 rig is $2400, and i9 is $2900
    And yeah, is for my work but also for gaming
     
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  4. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    How long are you anticipating keeping it then?
     
  5. AndresHdz

    AndresHdz Notebook Guru

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    3 years, the problem is right now my budget only goes to i7, is it worth the wait and extra work for the i9?
     
  6. senso

    senso Notebook Deity

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    What kind of tasks in specific?
    What laptop model?
    Lots of chassis will lead to overheating even with an i7, so the i9 doesn't perform much better due to being limited by temperature, and/or crippled BIOS and EC firmware that limits max power usage on top..

    I think that getting a cheaper laptop and a beffy NUC style can be a better option, just config the NUC to work headless and just remote into the NUC and do the heavy lifting..
     
  7. AndresHdz

    AndresHdz Notebook Guru

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    Mostly simulations (solidworks), programming, flight simming, and game development.
    If it is the I9, it would be an MSI GS7
    I7, a Sager
     
  8. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    A hard budget trumps everything else (always).

    If we look at the CPU value increase (in the link above), it is almost the same percentage as the increase in the cost. That indicates you are paying for extra performance linearly/(theoretically).

    If you're actually able to be 5% to 8.5% more productive during your work usage, the increased cost is justified along with a reasonable wait time, to save/earn the extra funds.

    As @senso mentions though, there may be other options to consider too, including the very real possibility that the specific model you're considering may not even give you full i7 performance, depending on the chassis/cooling design and BIOS implementation.
     
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  9. senso

    senso Notebook Deity

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    MSI GS75?

    The GS75 only has two heatpipes over the CPU, it has decent fin area, but over long periods of time doing simulations you will want at the very least a repaste with liquid metal and a raised laptop back, you wont be able to stretch the i9 legs much.

    For that kind of work a DTR-ish laptop chassis would be a better idea for a better cooling system.
     
  10. AndresHdz

    AndresHdz Notebook Guru

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    So in this case of laptops with not a lot of cooling systems the i7 would be a better option? As I don’t want to go higher on the budget for a better cooling...
     
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