Is the 120 gb5400rpm harddrive fast as the 60 gb 7200rpm?

Discussion in 'Dell' started by harddoom, Apr 23, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. gosman

    gosman Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    1
    Messages:
    141
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    30
    The compromise would be the one I ordered: 100gb at 7200rpm. Loads my photoshop pictures like a hurricane!
     
  2. DoubleBlack

    DoubleBlack Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    70
    Messages:
    1,086
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    55
    Which would be nice, but it costs a pretty penny!
     
  3. esoterica

    esoterica Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    17
    Messages:
    186
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    30
    You can always go with the cheapest Hard Drive Dell offers, then buy a second 7200RPM larger drive at newegg for a lot less money than the upgrade options and end up with 2 drives instead for less than the cost of upgrading to just one.

    Just pull the new cheaper drive out and set it aside, plug in the new drive, install your operating system fresh on the new better drive and all your drivers etc...

    If something ever happened to this aftermarket drive like a catastrophic disaster of some sort, you'd still have that second drive that originaly came with your system stored away in your underware drawer that you could just pop in and away you go.

    I didn't do this because I already have too many extra drives and parts around here, plus, after you've done countless installs on new drives and systems it begins to lose the fun aspect of doing it after a while like it had the first few times you did it. Saving $100 wasn't worth spending the time for me.

    The desktop PC I happen to be on right now has two 10K RPM 40Gig Drives on it running under a RAID 0 configuration for a year now and I've yet to even fill up half of a 40Gig drive, and I thought I was bad about storing old junk on it I don't need.

    My old laptop I just finally retired and replaced with a new Dell Latitude B820 was an old Dell Lattitude CS that only has like an 8Gig Hard Drive running Windows 2000 Pro. That thing was a lesson in proper data management for me for sure. Since Dell made that particular model at the time to be as light and portable as possible it doesn't have any extra drives like no CD drive, no floppy etc... so everything did have to be loaded on it across the network by copying CD's over to it, running the installation, then deleteing the installation files to recover the room. That thing was a constant chore for me to keep that little hard drive under the 3/4 full mark and when your running a Windows OS system and start filling up your drive over the 3/4 full mark your just asking for problems, trust me on that one, seen it too many times.
     
  4. jfinnican

    jfinnican Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    15
    I agree and disagree with this. (No, Im not John Kerry)

    Actually, partitioning does help. When you access the drive, it has to cover the entire span of data on that partition. This means, if you have one partition from the front to the back of the drive, as far out as the data is on that partition is how far out the head will travel, each time the drive is accessed.

    However,

    If you put your data / Swap on seperate partitions, you "increase" (term used loosely) the performance because the head is not forced to travel that much further during every read / write execution on that partition.

    I do agree that a 2nd drive is by far, better than partitioning but for the same reason. However IDE / SATA are single threaded IO. This means that data can only be read / written one at a time per controller, not device. This is more of an issue for IDE as 2 devices on the Primary / Secondary controller share that task. Another reason why SCSI is "better technology" as the drives and controllers are multithreaded IO. They can read and write data simultaniously. (sorry, my spelling stinks)

    IMO the best way to increase swap performance is to get a 2GB compact flash card and just drop it on that.... they are very cheap now BTW.

    Again, 7200RPM Drives to not make the drives "faster" Its only purpose is to even out the performance curve as you write data farther to the outside of the drive. You still loose performance as you write, just not as bad. Some drives just perform better because... they are better drives. I have seen 7200 RPM Samsung Drives give Raptors a **** good run for its money. I agree raptors are fast drives, however, I have some 160GB 7200RPM 16M Cache drives that give them a great run for the money, and they are 1/3 the price.

    The true bottleneck here is Drive techonolgy, Single threaded IO, and the controllers themselves. Dont get cought up in the "bigger is better" scam as Its often not the case.
     
  5. Photoguy30523

    Photoguy30523 Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    10
    Messages:
    271
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    30
    i go the 100gig 7200rpm harddrive but how do i really know if a 7200?
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page