Is sudden acceleration bad for the car?

Discussion in 'Motorized Vehicles' started by Pai, Sep 7, 2009.

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  1. Syndrome

    Syndrome Torque Matters

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    Honestly I don't really wait for any of my vehicles to warm up, I feel guilty every time I start up and drive off, but I'm just too dmn lazy to let it warm up. And one thing I forgot in my previous post, accelerating fast like that will be hard on your transmission more than your motor, that is if you've got an automatic and allow it to downshift by itself. Its rare for me to let my automatics downshift when they want to, once I know the car I do all the downshifting myself.
     
  2. runtohell121

    runtohell121 Notebook Deity

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    Well, I've been driving an automatic all time, the Acura didn't seem to be having much problem from sudden acceleration. The Honda Accord, when we first bought it from the owner, the transmission was kind of damage already.. from 1st to 2nd gear, it slips which is common problem for 1998-2002 Honda Accord V6. Just step on the gas, the transmission should downshift itself if it response quickly that is.
     
  3. flipfire

    flipfire Moderately Boss

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    OP is talking about a new car with a new engine thats still in the break-in stage, very bad idea to redline. Sudden acceleration is not recommended but you probably didnt do any damage to your engine at 4k rpm's

    You only need to wait 15seconds on a cold startup. The reason for this is oil pressure and enough time for the engine to spray oil over the internals. Remember that start up causes the most wear on an engine.

    You just have to granny shift for 10mins till its in operating temperatures, then you can go nuts. Cold oil doesnt lubricate as well as warm oil. Also car engines run optimally at operating temperatures. But for performance turbos, you have to warm up for 1-3mins or else it will drive like a pig.

    Pai, log on to your local Civic or car forums for best info.
     
  4. Levenly

    Levenly Grappling Deity

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    general rule of thumb - if your car isn't built to handle acceleration nor speed, then don't race it.
     
  5. MrX8503

    MrX8503 Notebook Evangelist

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    That is idiotic advice. If you don't warm up your engine be prepared to buy a new car.

    Good advice, I'm surprised no one mentioned of a break in period. Then again this isn't a car forum
     
  6. Syndrome

    Syndrome Torque Matters

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    I've ran my truck for years(since 93, and 400k miles without rebuilding the motor) without warming them up and they still run strong. Of course I don't live in the coldest of places, but it does freeze for a few months a year. I don't break them out and race them while cold, but I don't start them and then wait 5 minutes before driving them.

    The break in period should only last a few thousand miles, And your right, you do want to be nice to it then, and change the oil out soon the first time.
     
  7. Patrick

    Patrick I beat spamers with stiks

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    People are so nice to their cars.... I will Redline my car pulling away from my house in the morning. And by Redline I mean hit ~4200rpm until the car decided the engine is warm enough to allow me to hit 6500rpm.
     
  8. Trottel

    Trottel Notebook Virtuoso

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    My owner's manual says not to warm up the car and to drive right away. One of my engines hit 100k miles a couple months ago (I've put on maybe 100 since) and an oil analysis shows very little wear. The other has 180k now and also shows very little wear. Also, most of my driving is short distance, the stuff that is supposed to be bad for your car. One of my cars has an oil temp gauge and the oil doesn't warm up before I park it. The oil takes about 10-15 minutes to reach full temp. Using premium oil, filters, and regular changes has a lot more affect on engine wear than how you drive the car. I use Mobil 1 15w-50 in my 92 BMW 325i convertible and Mobil 1 5w-30 in my 92 BMW 325i sedan. Only the finest synthetic media filters the oil in both cases, which catches much finer particles than regular paper filters that people buy and shops install. The premium I pay for oil and filters and the frequency at which I do changes is going to ensure my engines last longer than joe blow's engine in his automatic accord that never goes over 4k rpm. I redline my cars every chance I get.
     
  9. MrX8503

    MrX8503 Notebook Evangelist

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    Easy driving first few minutes is relative to warming up an engine. I'm sure your manual doesn't say redline it right away in sub zero freezing temperatures.

    Nothing hard to understand about how metals are weakened from abrupt temperature changes.
     
  10. K-TRON

    K-TRON Hi, I'm Jimmy Diesel ^_^

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    I let my engines idle for at least minutes before racing off with them. My neighbor has a diesel in his hummer and he has a timer set to 5 minutes. After 5 minutes is up, he can use it.
    I know guys with older style diesels like MAN and DEUTZ, and they let them sit idling for about 10-15 minutes before using them. I know on Detroits, you can manually lock the engine at 1200rpm for warmup.

    New engines arent particular good, just cause its new doesnt mean its built better or will last as long. In reality, older engines will last longer than any of the aluminum block ones machined today. Cast iron will always be the superior engine block - when it comes to durability.

    K-TRON
     
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