Is my Razer Blade 15 screwed?

Discussion in 'Razer' started by Rob Moua, Mar 21, 2020.

  1. Rob Moua

    Rob Moua Newbie

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  2. amihail91

    amihail91 Notebook Consultant

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    Oof - how hot is hot?
     
  3. Rob Moua

    Rob Moua Newbie

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    When running Metro Exodus at medium was getting like 85C and keyboard is hot.
     
  4. No0B

    No0B Notebook Consultant

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    That capacitor blew up. Does the machine still fully function? If so, the capacitor either blew up in a way that just lets the current pass unaltered (highly unlikely), or there's a fallback trace. So whatever component depends on the filtering that that capacitor provides is now getting less clean current. And in the moment of blowing up, whatever's at the ends of the traces that capacitor is part of, probably got a whole lot of current going through it.

    Without schematics of the motherboard I'm not sure we can say what it's for. Based on the closeness to the GPU's VRMs it may as well filter something for that, but may just as well filter for something on the other side of the motherboard. It's likely nothing too important since there's an empty space for another capacitor right next to it and their descriptions on the board are the same aside from the number increment.
     
  5. Rob Moua

    Rob Moua Newbie

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    The laptop boots up, runs games fine, the fan is on and increases when needed and nothing that I noticed differently. I am undervolting on GPU and CPU too. I would like to know for sure what that blown component is for though.
     
  6. Rob Moua

    Rob Moua Newbie

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  7. No0B

    No0B Notebook Consultant

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    As all the displayed voltages are either usually fluctuating heavily, or are offsets, and HWiNFO doesn't expose more voltages on this machine, this doesn't help unfortunately. Software readouts of system voltages are not accurate enough anyway to reliably tell anything fishy going on. Except for when it's extreme.

    That said, nothing wrong with these voltages. The battery is supposed to be around 17.6V fully charged. That fits the bill. The CPU VID is only remotely representative of the real voltage, because it's the voltage the CPU requests from the VRM's controller. What it's actually getting can be wholly different. Usually, desktop motherboards and some notebooks implement sensors as part of their VRM, which again is not very accurate, but close enough for most monitoring needs. The Blade either doesn't have that, or HWiNFO doesn't implement it.

    If you want to be absolutely sure, measure the voltage coming in at the pads next to the blown capacitor, and compare that to other, healthy machines. In any case, if the machine functions, it might be not all that important. I'd still remove it just in case and replace it with a fresh one if possible.
     
  8. senso

    senso Notebook Deity

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    Thats a polyfuse(basically its a resistor, the more current you draw the higher the resistance so it acts like a fuse, when it cools down it resets, its to prevent accidental shorts, so it did its job), it shorted because you either left the battery or the charger connected and you made a short circuit between that component and the heatsink most likely.
    It looks a bit discoloured, and there seems to be a bit of surface damage, to be totally sure I would replace it, but if its working dont touch it, if your laptop starts crashing or stops working, thats the first culprit that you will need to change if such happens.
     
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  9. No0B

    No0B Notebook Consultant

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    Oh really? I kind of suspected it to be one actually, but went with it being a capacitor, since there's also light brown SMD capacitors in all kinds of electronics. Was just not sure about the writing on it, which I couldn't find anywhere in reference to capacitors. The more you know.

    Sorry, @Rob Moua. Got it wrong.
     
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  10. senso

    senso Notebook Deity

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    Its written PF801 on the silkscreen, plus polyfuses have that look(replace a few dozens when I repaired laptops for a living, so I known then by looks).
     
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