Is it typical for Lenovo to stop support for notebooks after release?

Discussion in 'Lenovo' started by HTWingNut, Jul 5, 2009.

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  1. HTWingNut

    HTWingNut Potato

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    Thanks for your input. I almost never use tech support for issues. I'm mainly concerned about driver and BIOS updates to tune and improve performance and support new OS features (like Windows 7).

    So far they seem to think there needs to be an issue to offer any video driver, or any other device driver, updates.
     
  2. admlam

    admlam Notebook Deity NBR Reviewer

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    I wholeheartedly agree with both sides of the argument.

    On one hand, my purchase of the U330 was based on Lenovo's reputation, which was established by the legacy of the ThinkPad brand, and the attractive specifications on paper. Even at that, the U330 still doesn't exactly lives up to all the advertised specifications, the battery life and wear issues in particular, which Lenovo dismisses as nuances in testing methodology - Okay, fair enough I suppose.

    By merit of being two separate lines catering to two completely different markets, the IdeaPad is not a ThinkPad. Hence, Lenovo is not obligated to provide the same level of service. With that in mind, I would opt for the ThinkPad and never look at the IdeaPad line for my future purchases.

    Still, by not providing 64 bit drivers or promising Windows 7 support, that's just rubbing salt into the wounds of fed up U330 owners. \end rant
     
  3. Mark@Lenovo

    Mark@Lenovo Company Representative

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    admlam,

    I've raised the question in IdeaPad Win7 support, especially since we continue to sell the U330 and purchasers after June 26 qualify for the win7 upgrade. As I understand it, driver and application (for existing preload) support will be in place at the time MS officially releases Win 7.

    All,

    IdeaPad and ThinkPad are indeed two seperate product lines in the business. As such they may have different specs, pricing, service / support options, and sales routes.

    We've had more updates for some IdeaPads than others in terms of BIOS and drivers. There are a number of cases where there are differences in capabilities between Thinkpad and IdeaPad. For example, all ThinkPads have option batteries available, but not all IdeaPad models may. Virtualization is supported on a number of ThinkPads while it is not supported on Ideapad. However, many IdeaPads tend to have HDMI ports, much better speakers, gloss screens (which may or may not be a plus, depending on preference) etc.

    I think the opportunity for Lenovo is to understand the changing needs over the life of the product, and in many cases, the customer's desire to change or update it - different OS, upgrades, etc. Declining sale prices in the industry do create cost / expense pressures which may limit the amount of ongoing updates to an existing product beyond basic warranty support (resolving any defects in the original config)

    Personally, I think this is a real challenge for this industry, because as a customer, my expectations don't decline just because things are on sale.



    Mark
     
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