Is it a good idea to get a 4k gaming laptop?

Discussion in 'Gaming (Software and Graphics Cards)' started by jddunlap, Jan 20, 2015.

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  1. ryzeki

    ryzeki Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    Yes, you can notice the pixels because they are still physically noticeable. PPI on a 15-18inch laptop is not that big. However, you will notice scaling, and artifacts, with a 4k screen.

    I'd say a well made IPS 1080 screen will work better for now. My asus has a 15.6 inch ips screen and I have a viewing distance of about 2 feet, and I don't really "notice" pixels until I get closer.
     
  2. jddunlap

    jddunlap Notebook Enthusiast

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    17 inches, and 2 feet. It's a little less noticable on 15.6" but still there is a noticable difference for me.
     
  3. octiceps

    octiceps Nimrod

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    You must have out-of-this-world eyesight then.
     
  4. hfm

    hfm Notebook Prophet

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    I have actually been using everything at 1600x900 including windows on my blade due to Unity. Looks great. Obviously the desktop looks better at 1800p, extremely easy to get used to. Honestly for games is extremely hard to notice.
     
  5. maxheap

    maxheap caparison horus :)

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    I love 3K while writing papers, the pdfs look so crisp (LaTeX generated stuff looks amazing on 3K, like posters just pop, all the detail is there on screen). I wouldn't comment on 4K as I never had it (I will get hands on experience next week), though it might be too small. Maybe on 17 or 18 inch (if it existed).

     
  6. aqnb

    aqnb Notebook Evangelist

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    One thing I didn't realize till I didn't see 3K screen in person was how much more "pure" colors are with high-DPI screens. It's basically the same thing like people complain about Oculus Rift headsets: screen-door effect caused by seeing unlit grid between pixels.

    Even without seeing any pixel patterns that would show more details, just looking at big empty mono-colored areas you can clearly see the difference (especially noticeable with white).

    Simply by having different inter-pixel spaces, high-DPI screens do look different than just 1080p ones. Once you notice, it's kinda curse. Before I wasn't aware of pixel grid on 1080p screen, now I can't unsee it. :(
     
  7. HTWingNut

    HTWingNut Potato

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    If you can see the pixel grid on your 1080p screen then either you have a crappy screen or are sitting way to close to your LCD. If I get about a foot from my LCD I can start to see it, but anything beyond that is not noticeable, and I've used several 4k screens for extended periods and have a 3k 13.3" screen as well that I use on a regular basis. In any case, from my experience the headaches with 3k/4k are not worth it. I would have preferred a 1080p LCD in my Samsung notebook but it is only offered with 1080p and got the laptop for a bargain price, so I'll deal with it. Plus I rarely game on it (although it has scaling issues there too).
     
  8. nipsen

    nipsen Notebook Ditty

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    ..since "4k" is really 3840 x 2160, double 1920x1080, it does actually scale down well to an even pixel-height. So I wouldn't really worry too much about that for games in an exclusive screen context. I think.. there was a long discussion about this somewhere else on the forum as well.. that the doubling effect actually will be lower, since the individual pixel collections on a 4k screen are smaller. I'm not .. completely sure about that, but it's likely.

    On top of that, a newer 4k screen would be made with newer lcd2 or ips tech, and that is going to give you an advantage over more common back-lit panels in every way.

    The only real drawback to having a 4k screen turns up if you run windows. Where everything that isn't the new overlay either becomes tiny, or blurred from careless upscale, or doesn't fit with the actual graphical representation. Actually, the sdk still allows people to include graphical components with fixed sizes. This (read: idiocy) is probably the biggest issue stopping common adoption of a better standard right now. ..of course, if you work with linux normally - no problem. Enjoy your 15 year old vector-based scaling UI. :p
     
  9. jddunlap

    jddunlap Notebook Enthusiast

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    This is exactly it.
     
  10. jddunlap

    jddunlap Notebook Enthusiast

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    Ironically I hosed an Ubuntu install by trying to scale it to 200% and had to muddle around on the system terminal to try to fix it. As for Windows, there are still apps that look messed up on high-DPI and I've been tracking these for a while, and they have been being fixed at a pretty rapid pace, so I am not too worried.
     
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