Intel's new Wi-Fi Cards detailed on the website

Discussion in 'Networking and Wireless' started by coldcoffee, Mar 22, 2017.

  1. coldcoffee

    coldcoffee Newbie

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  2. Starlight5

    Starlight5 So what if I'm crazy? The best people are.

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    @coldcoffee 9560 seem to have some CNVio connector/interface, can't find any info on it. Waiting eagerly for WiGiG version.
     
  3. downloads

    downloads Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    So I guess that settles it - we're not gonna see three stream cards. Instead they will achieve the same sort of speeds by making channels 160 MHz wide.

    That might make it easier for users to upgrade without the necessity to wire a third antenna somewhere but that also means we've been sold three stream routers that will never be used as such, and those of us with wave 1 802.11ac would have to, not only buy a new card but also a new router...
     
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  4. Starlight5

    Starlight5 So what if I'm crazy? The best people are.

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    @downloads on the other hand such a router will definitely be cheaper, cooler and more compact than 3-stream monstrosities.
     
  5. downloads

    downloads Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    I don't think so - one stream less means only slightly less power usage by one of the radios, but you still need the same number of radios. And most power usage comes from SoC anyway.
    As for the price I bet you that won't happen - they sell number and the higher the number, the higher the price.

    An unrelated thing - how quickly will 5GHz band get saturated if we keep using 160 MHz channel width?
     
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  6. HiveMind

    HiveMind Notebook Enthusiast

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    Is that the main difference?


    How useful will the Intel CNVio interface be?
     
  7. Ionising_Radiation

    Ionising_Radiation ?v = ve*ln(m0/m1)

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    Rather slowly. 5 GHz has dozens of channels, compared to the 13 of 2.4 GHz... Not to mention how widely used 2.4 GHz is.
     
  8. downloads

    downloads Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    I'm not sure - I think there are only two 160MHz channels in the US - 50 and 114 and only 6 80MHz channels. I'm not sure how channel bonding works on 5GHz band.
     
  9. IntelUser

    IntelUser Notebook Deity

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    Sorry for resurrecting the thread, but I know the difference.

    CNVi refers to the integrated wireless portion on the next generation chipsets(CNL PCH-H). They mention CRF, which is a Companion RF module, which will be needed for full function.

    It means due to integration it'll be much cheaper because parts of the WiFi chipset will be in the PCH while other part would be in the CRF module.
     
  10. TheThinker

    TheThinker Newbie

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    Can any one please confirm if I can replace Intel: 9560 on my Alienware 17 R4, which has a killer 1435.
     
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