Intel`s next SSD, 520 - Includes Sandforce

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Cloudfire, Oct 21, 2011.

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  1. Mihael Keehl

    Mihael Keehl Notebook Evangelist

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    Precisely why I didn't bother getting the new Samsung 830 that just hit, I figured it was easier just getting a new 470 series, which it was and for a really good price.
     
  2. Tsunade_Hime

    Tsunade_Hime such bacon. wow

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    Yeah pretty strange on Ebay old school PM800/810 are still ridiculously overpriced when I saw 2 weeks ago a brand new 256 GB 470 series for 280 shipped..
     
  3. Mihael Keehl

    Mihael Keehl Notebook Evangelist

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    Yeah, it was expensive, but you can get them pretty cheap you just have to be lucky enough to win the auction. I got mine relatively cheap compared to most, but then again it was simply a bare drive.

    When auctioned, that drive goes as much as $225 from what I've seen. Follow a few auctions and you'll see what I'm talking about.
     
  4. djembe

    djembe drum while you work

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    Well, the 4th came and went without any Intel announcement.
     
  5. Cloudfire

    Cloudfire (Really odd person)

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  6. Nemix77

    Nemix77 Notebook Deity

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    I'm really getting sick of waiting... Intel shows Q3 2011 on their SSD road map with rumors of a November 4th 2011 release but it's come and gone and still no official announcement, more like Q4 2011.

    I'm waiting on Hawley Creek which should be released at the same time or a week after 520 but still no words.

    I'm getting tired of waiting for Intel, only reason why I'm doing so is because most on this forum recommend Intel for SSD's especially on mSATA's since Crucial has nothing on the market for this form factor.

    I'm so thinking of getting a MyDigital Bullet Proof 128GB mSATA right now, in fact I've been thinking of doing that since a month ago but I keep telling myself it'll be worth the wait for Intel and at the same time thinking if I get the MyDigital and Intel comes out a week or two later that would be bummer.

    But this, this is getting ridiculous!
     
  7. blinder

    blinder Notebook Consultant

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    I'm waiting on Hawley Creek as well Nemix77 - hang in there mate - you're not alone :)
     
  8. Nemix77

    Nemix77 Notebook Deity

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    Thanks for comfort zone.

    I'm hoping Hawley Creek turns out as good as the 320's speed with inclusion of all features found on it's older brother and without firmware glitch.
     
  9. ickibar123

    ickibar123 Notebook Consultant

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    I too am waiting for a worthy SSD to upgrade from my X25-m G2 80GB. From the roadmap articles I've seen, the Intel 520 has 40K IOPS random read, whereas my G2 has 35K IOPS random read. Not much of an improvement.
    All the sandforce 2K series SSDs from the comparison charts on Anandtech, the random read performance on SATA 2 isn't that much improved either.

    Maybe King Crest will be it, or Sandforce 3K series controllers, or whatever it'll be called
     
  10. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    Given any current SSD (since early 2011), the R r/w speeds do not make a drive faster or slower in real world use. Sure the 'scores' on benchmarks change - but that is not how a workstation/notebook computer is normally used.

    The response latency of the nand during read/write operations is what is mostly reponsible for the 'feel' of the SSD in actual use.

    To see a noticeable difference in how SSD's operate - you need a current platform that can not only show them off, but also not hinder them too.

    A SNB platform with an i7 and at least 8GB RAM (16GB RAM recommended) is what will show off SSD differences if there are any.

    To put this in perspective:

    An Intel 510 Series 250GB SSD (partitioned to use only 100GB and the rest left 'unallocated') on an i7 SNB platform with 32GB RAM 'scores' a 7.8 in WEI. With a 4.4GHz O/C, this system is simply the fastest and snappiest system I have ever used.

    An M4 256GB SSD (partitioned as the Intel 510, above) on a mobile i7 platform with 16GB RAM 'scores' a 7.9 in WEI. It is maybe 2-5% 'snappier' than the Intel 510 (with a R w score of ~4.5 times less than the M4 and a R r score ~33% less than the M4) when the storage sub-system is the constraining factor.

    When the Intel based platform was also at 16GB RAM - the 'better' M4's storage sub-system R r/w 'scores' were not enough to produce more work - the horsepower of the Intel 510 based better cpu was more than enough to offset the better R r/w benchmarks the M4 could produce.

    When the M4 and the Intel were switched and the M4 was used on the higher end platform; there was less work produced than with the nominally lower performing (in benchmarks) Intel SSD - the Sequentials really do play a part in overall performance and it really shows.

    When pushed, the current offerings are at least double (in my case closer to 10x) more 'worthy' than an 80GB X25-M - especially if it is a 'gen 1' model - given that the platform and usage we put them on will be both current and 'real world'.



    See:
    AnandTech - The Crucial m4 SSD Update: Faster with FW0009



    So, on a SATA2 platform (and all that entails...) it is not the SSD's that have not improved - it is the platform that is holding them back.

    The 'need' and the 'wow' factor of an SSD is best shown on a fully optimized current platform with at least 16GB RAM - and even then, over a state of the art mechanical drive setup, it needs a certain usage scenario to be 'worth it', imo. Unless all we're doing is trying to impress ourselves and our friends with the 'snappiness' our system has.

    Point: an i7 SNB platform is simply starving for RAM at 8GB.

    16GB makes it come alive (even with an SSD + 8GB RAM initally) and 32GB sets it free. I'm talking just 'snappiness' here - if your workload also demands the high capacity RAM for the smoothest, most lag-free workflow (ie: gaming, video/photo editing, VM's, etc) - then sticking to 8GB (or, horror! less) is like racing at Daytona on Wal-Mart tires.

    With prices much more reasonable for 8GB RAM modules, these 'ideal' configs are within almost anyone's reach.

    See:
    Newegg.ca - Patriot Signature 8GB 204-Pin DDR3 SO-DIMM DDR3 1333 (PC3 10600) Laptop Memory Model PSD38G13332S

    See:
    Newegg.ca - Patriot Gamer 2 Series 8GB 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1333 (PC3 10666) Desktop Memory Model PG38G1333EL



    Why am I concentrating on everything other than the SSD's in this post? Because the platform+cpu+ram combo make a bigger difference in real world performance (and 'snap') than any current modern SSD does.

    When storage sub-systems are RAM (speed-wise) based, I'll change my opinion - depending on the specific workload in question. ;)
     
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