Intel Mobile Processor Compatibility Guide

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Commander Wolf, Jan 17, 2008.

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  1. ridingdirty

    ridingdirty Newbie

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    It looks like inserting a quadcore may be possible on the dv6. I say this for two reasons.

    1. If you have a PM45 Chipset. The bios and chipset driver VERSION (F.46 I believe for the BIOS. Not sure on the chipset off the top of my head) are the same for the dv7 with the q9000 and (at least my) dv6-1362nr. The biggest problem I see is the heat that CPU puts out.

    For example: This DV7 (dv7-2040us) has the same drivers for BIOS and chipset (even has the same gpu) as mine.

    2. If you look up the manual for the DV6 (again at least mine shows this), the Q9000 and even the Q9100 show as available processors.

    This is not a guarantee, but if you have money and time it may be worth it to check this.

    dv7-2040us is the model. Look it up on newegg (specs are available still). You can see it has a PM45 Board.

    Try these steps. (GO TO THE HP SUPPORT SITE FOR THE BELOW)

    1. Make sure the install chipset driver is the same as the HP Pavilion dv7-2040us. If not, install it as LONG AS IT IS AVAILABLE FOR YOUR SPECIFIC COMPUTER.

    2. Make sure bios is at same bios for HP Pavilion dv7-2040us. If not, install it as LONG AS IT IS AVAILABLE FOR YOUR SPECIFIC COMPUTER.

    3. Spend $40 approximately on a Q9000, install it, and cross your fingers.

    OR

    Get a P9700/9600 and call it a day.
     
  2. Ritz009

    Ritz009 Newbie

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    Dear Commander Wolf

    I really admire your efforts in putting this fabulous thread to help out Core 2 folks.

    I have a simple question will HP/Pegatron Maureen which is mentioned to have SOCKET P, support any Extreme or Quad Core CPUs in the likes of -

    Core 2 Extreme (2Core)
    • Core 2 Extreme X7800 2600 4096 800
    • Core 2 Extreme X7900 2800 4096 800
    • Core 2 Extreme X9000 2800 6144 800
    • Core 2 Extreme X9100 3066 6144 1066
    Quad Core (4Core)
    • Core 2 Quad Q9000 2000 2/3072 1066 45
    • Core 2 Quad Q9100 2266 2/6144 1066 45
    • Core 2 Quad Q9200 2400 2/6144 1066 45
    Quad Core Extreme
    • Core 2 Extreme QX9300 2533 2/6144 1066
    The official document only refers to Penryn Txxxx & Pxxxx Processor Support :( and what frightens me is the WIKI Page of Socket P it seems that Quad Core have tricky different Socket Spec as Socket P' (sic)

    Thanks in advance for all the help.

    Ritz
     
  3. DylRicho

    DylRicho Notebook Consultant

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    I'd really like to know why a desktop computer is using laptop components. It seems rather silly and honestly, annoying.

    To answer your question, the fastest processor for your machine is the T9900 (spec code SLGEE). If quad-cores are not listed, I wouldn't risk it.

    They do require more power, and I think the specified Socket P' is capable of providing more power, while Socket P isn't.

    I also doubt any Core2 Extreme will work. I mean, the only reason a desktop would use laptop parts is to save on power consumption and heat dissipation, so I don't think HP would then go and support a Core2 Extreme that outputs more heat than the processors designated in the spec sheet.
     
  4. tijo

    tijo Sacred Blame Super Moderator

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    Unrelated to the CPU compatibility., but it seems like the touchsmart line was built similar to iMacs, but smaller and thinner. Basically, a LCD panel with the internals right behind it. HP probably decided to put laptop components to lower the overall amount of heat generated. Either because they wanted to make it as thing as possible, but more likely because they could cheap on cooling and construction that way.
     
  5. DylRicho

    DylRicho Notebook Consultant

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    And for this reason, I would suggest to avoid anything higher than a T9900.
     
  6. yobry1

    yobry1 Newbie

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    Thanx for the great guide. I'm looking for more info on 855pm chipset. The guide says 400mhz fsb but, I've read on several forums 533mhz fsb cpu's working so I installed M770 s479 cpu in my toshiba with 855pm chipset and it does work. Problem is win 7 system shows 2.13ghz but is running at 598mhz. There is no way to change power settings in bios (old toshiba limited bios, ugh) and changing power settings in win7 to high perfomance doesn't help either. So I put the M745 back in and it still running only at 598mhz. This is a fresh install of win7 with all updates installed so I tried to install rmclock to see if I could change multiplier from 6x to a higher but when I try to install rmclock i get error- cannot install or load RTCore32 driver. Any ideas why this won't install?

    Is there another app that can change the multiplier?

    Has anyone else successfully installed a 533 fsb cpu with 855pm chipset and running at the correct speed(instead of 598mhz) in win7?
     
  7. DylRicho

    DylRicho Notebook Consultant

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    You may have tried high-performance, but have you checked the processor performance states? It sounds like something is either limiting the processor, or the software is reporting false frequencies.

    1) Click "Change plan settings" next to the high-performance plan.

    2) Click "Change advanced power settings."

    3) Scroll down to "Processor power management."

    4a) 100% on minimum will disable SpeedStep, while 0% will obviously limit performance severely. Ideally, you should be conservative with the minimum state, to make sure the processor can relax while not being taxed.

    4b) Feel free to go for 100% on maximum, unless you feel like saving power on battery. For the system cooling policy, be sure to use active, which will turn up the fan before slowing the Pentium down.

    5) Can you also try the latest version of CPU-Z, to see if SpeedStep is enabled and working? (The frequency will be constantly changing, if it's active.)

    Dylan
     
  8. xurena

    xurena Newbie

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    Thanks for this guide. Just upgraded today my Dell Vostro 1200 (year 2008) Intel GM965 chipset from T5470 1.6Ghz to T7800 2.6Ghz, works fine, no heat, in fact heat is lower than previous one.

    :)
     
  9. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    Something most people miss is that today's workloads are more strenuous than when these CPU's were originally introduced. Even 'light' workloads like browsing, word processing and simple O/S navigation.

    The more powerful processor is able to run at it's idle states for a longer %age of it's time because it finishes the workload faster. Hence, lower heat (and probably less noise (fans) and more battery life... for a given workload).

    See:
    http://www.cpubenchmark.net/compare.php?cmp[]=986&cmp[]=1005


    While the multithreaded performance is a satisfying 77% higher with the more powerful processor, the real improvement for 'basic workloads' is the single threaded performance that is an equally impressive ~64% higher.

    Except for the high TDP (almost 10x vs. today's platforms at the same or better performance level...), the T7800 offers what is very close to a current 'good' experience for basic computer usage.

    Great to see your experience was so successful. :)


     
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