Intel Core i9-9900k 8c/16t, i7-9700K 8c/8t, i7-9600k 6c/6t 2nd Gen Coffee Lake CPU's + Z390

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by hmscott, Nov 27, 2017.

  1. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    What was the microcode revision of the P0 9900K that was tested?
    C4 (or C6, I honestly forgot if it's C4 or C6) microcode is a piece of Dog feces even on an old W10 build like 1703 (which doesn't have any OS mitigations if it isn't fully updated).
    A2, AE and BE are much better and have identical performance on a windows build with all mitigations disabled.
     
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  2. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    What I am curious about is with the 9900ks or 9900k R0, can the built in mitigations be disabled? I know some require the OS to enable / support them, but are there changes that are always enabled in the newer stepping microcode included?

    And, if you disable the mitigations in the OS, are the latency benefits of the new R0 stepping also disabled?
     
  3. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOK's Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

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    @Talon can test his 9900KS with InSpectre tool
     
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  4. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    I was hoping he'd figure that out - hint hint - :D

    That way he can enable / disable mitigations and compare results - what shows / doesn't show in InSpectre and it's effect on performance.

    Could be fun :)
     
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  5. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOK's Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

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    Always fun with new hardware. And more fun if you can upgrade or downgrade your machine for benching:D
    4F838C74-4284-4F2F-AFD3-007248B96A09.jpeg

    Edit. First bench after 10 years tucked away in the drawer
    http://forum.notebookreview.com/thr...ers-welcome-too.810490/page-672#post-10964266
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2019
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  6. Talon

    Talon Notebook Virtuoso

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    Sorry just seeing this now, I will test this out shortly. I wondered about that myself, but since the chip has hardware mitigation, would we be applying software and hardware mitigation if selected on? What would be the default setting? Somewhat confusing for sure. Either way I would always choose to have them off since I feel the risk to my essentially pure gaming machine is pretty low.
     
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  7. ajc9988

    ajc9988 Death by a thousand paper cuts

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    Yes, you would still have software fixes. Spectre and meltdown were a multitude of flaws. Same with the later L1 cache flaw, the memory flaw, the HT flaw, etc. The hardware fixes only addressed certain Spectre and other flaws. Microcode, firmware, and software mitigations are still in play here, just like they are with cascade-sp and cascade-X.

    The hardware mitigations are baked in. There is no off switch. But you can still remove the software mitigations.

    Does that make more sense of the hardware/software mitigation issue? Now, for microcode fixes, that comes down to firmware version used or OS version used. Firmware will update the microcode auto magically. You must use a firmware new enough to use the KS processor. So it may take some research. As to the OS, if the MB is no longer updating security or firmware patches, the OS loads the newer microcode during the secure boot loading for windows and during some phase for Linux. So, you would have to make sure you use an old enough version of windows 10 or earlier AND need to make sure the update from MS containing the microcode is not installed.

    And that is just for the microcode. Then there is the actual patches to mitigate the vulnerabilities on top of that.

    Just wanted to give more info on it.
     
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  8. Talon

    Talon Notebook Virtuoso

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    It looks as though the 9900KS is Meltdown hardware protected. In fact once I disabled OS mitigation via Inspectre tool I cannot re enable it! I've rebooted a few times and it always just defaults to OFF now. Using the MDS tool, it appears my chip is not affected by Meltdown at all due to the hardware mitigation. It appears to also have taken care of the MDS vulnerabilities.

    Odd that it also recognizes the 9900KS as Whiskey Lake vs Coffee Lake?

    https://imgur.com/a/i2bi6JX

    Cinebench shows essentially same performance with Spectre turned on and off via Inspectre. I need to do testing using something else.
     
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  9. Robbo99999

    Robbo99999 Notebook Prophet

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    Maybe you actually have INCREASED performance now that Meltdown is being taken care of in hardware and the software Meltdown mitigations are disabled? I'm kinda surprised that the software mitigations weren't turned off by default if your hardware contains the mitigations itself - I would have thought Windows might have auto detected your CPU had that hardware mitigation and so switched off it's software mitigation. You'd think that Microsoft could provide updates to turn off unnecessary software mitigations when new hardware comes on the scene. Do you have more performance now that you have manually turned off Meltdown software protection? (You still have the protection in hardware, so I guess that's all good).
     
  10. Talon

    Talon Notebook Virtuoso

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    Refreshing to see a channel that is actually taking the time to really dive deep into thermal and power testing for the 9900KS. His results are strikingly similar to the results I showed here with my own 9900KS. The part that is most interesting to me is the power consumption savings especially as you drive the clockspeeds up which leads to some seriously improved thermals.
     
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