Intel + AMD SOC NUC - yep, that's right

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by HTWingNut, Jan 7, 2018.

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  1. HTWingNut

    HTWingNut Potato

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    Interesting...



    Intel quad core CPU + AMD Radeon RX Vega Mobile Graphics on same PCB. Apparently GPU similar performance to Nvidia GTX 1060 and has HBM 2 RAM onboard as well.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    100W TDP cooling. There is a 65W and a 100W version. 65W @ $799, 100W @ $999.

    These will likely make their way into laptops eventually.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    It's interesting that AMD has their own similar design, combining Ryzen + Vega hybrid, with similar goals.

    I wonder how either or both Intel and AMD justify and differentiate themselves, especially when deciding to simultaneous release - essentially so even if AMD came out a couple of months first.

    The major differentiation - Meltdown / Spectre - must have been on the minds of both given the behind the scenes discovery months before release.

    Until this security snafu I was wondering how people would decide which to get, and thought it was most likely Intel would get the larger integration by vendors, so AMD would be seen as an also ran participant - but benefiting from all sales of the hybrids.

    I wonder how that is going to change moving forward now, with Intel's CPU portion seen as more insecure than AMD's - and not just the insecurity but the performance hit seen now and growing as new mediation patches for OS, firmware, and applications continues.

    These new revelations really add some spice to the competition. :)
     
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  3. cj_miranda23

    cj_miranda23 Notebook Evangelist

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    Linus "Intel expected performance in the neighborhood of better than 1060 max q" for a price of 1K for 100 watts without ram, storage and and OS. Another overpriced product imo!
     
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  4. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    There will be other cost conscious implementations, the Intel NUC's have a history of being overpriced, yet very popular - it's that awesome Skull logo ;)
    dims.png
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2018
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  5. cj_miranda23

    cj_miranda23 Notebook Evangelist

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    Whoever the company I wish they would tremendously reduce their price. My god for 1K you can purchase a Ryzen 1700x plus Gtx 1080 Ti cpu gpu combo:eek:
     
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  6. HTWingNut

    HTWingNut Potato

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    Yeah, price is a killer. It should cost half as much, honestly.
     
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  7. OverTallman

    OverTallman Notebook Evangelist

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    Well if you want a powerhouse that's as small as a USFF or a thin client, besides this and some micro-STX builds (which are equally expensive, sometimes even more), you really don't have other choices.
     
  8. HTWingNut

    HTWingNut Potato

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    To me, the point of a NUC isn't necessarily for gaming, and having a decently powerful dedicated GPU and "VR ready" indicates it's intended as such. You can get as powerful or more powerful hardware in a very small form factor that gives more flexibility and expansion and at a cheaper price. I can see this applicable to thin and light laptops, however, since everything is all soldered on anyhow.

    Don't get me wrong. I'm glad they make this tech because it usually cascades into other areas. Just as a user, not sure I see much of a market for it.
     
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