Intel’s Core-X i9 and i7 series (x299) & Xeon (1P/2P)

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Dr. AMK, May 12, 2017.

  1. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

    Reputations:
    4,976
    Messages:
    17,571
    Likes Received:
    21,576
    Trophy Points:
    931
    That's not an x299 i9 CPU, it's a z370 i7 CPU...again you posted in this thread with OT content... :rolleyes:

    Here's a good place to discuss that special edition CPU:

    Alleged Intel Core i7-8086K 40th Anniversary Processor Leaked and Benchmarked – 6c/12t , 5.1 ghz !
    http://forum.notebookreview.com/threads/alleged-intel-core-i7-8086k-40th-anniversary-processor-leaked-and-benchmarked-–-6c-12t-5-1-ghz.815636/page-4#post-10740528
     
  2. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKS = That sucks! Dont wast your $ on FILTHY

    Reputations:
    15,702
    Messages:
    19,923
    Likes Received:
    31,268
    Trophy Points:
    931
    X299 is soon dead. This is what’s coming...

    I really hope AMD this time can offer a lot more than 16 cores for next (coming) Ryzen Threadripper... Intel Unveils 28-core/56-thread HEDT Processor-Techpowerup.com

    Intel crushes Computex with a 28-core chip, a 5GHz 8086K, two new architectures and more-Pcworld.com

    As we all know... Last time was AMD trumped by 18 core i9-7980Xe. Will we see the same happen this time as well?

    Edit.

    Intel Shows Off 28 Core / 56 Thread HEDT X299 Processor, Destroys Every Other HEDT Chip – Also Promises Mainstream Platform CPU Updates in 2018
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2018
    Dr. AMK likes this.
  3. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

    Reputations:
    1,855
    Messages:
    1,363
    Likes Received:
    2,868
    Trophy Points:
    181
    The arrival of Intel's 28-core CPU at 2:47
     
    Talon and Papusan like this.
  4. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

    Reputations:
    4,976
    Messages:
    17,571
    Likes Received:
    21,576
    Trophy Points:
    931
    Time to start another Intel CPU / Motherboard chipset thread, as "x299 is dead..." - @Papusan

    How about one of you two do it this time? I'm swearing off / at Intel until the new architecture CPU's arrive next 18-24 months. :)
     
    Dr. AMK likes this.
  5. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKS = That sucks! Dont wast your $ on FILTHY

    Reputations:
    15,702
    Messages:
    19,923
    Likes Received:
    31,268
    Trophy Points:
    931
    Talon and Dr. AMK like this.
  6. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

    Reputations:
    1,855
    Messages:
    1,363
    Likes Received:
    2,868
    Trophy Points:
    181
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2018
    Mr. Fox, Vasudev and Papusan like this.
  7. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

    Reputations:
    4,976
    Messages:
    17,571
    Likes Received:
    21,576
    Trophy Points:
    931
    Intel i9-9980XE Review: Disappointing Overclocker, But Good Stock
    Gamers Nexus
    Published on Nov 13, 2018
    The Intel i9-9980XE didn't perform exactly as we expected. Our review of the CPU looks at stock and overclocking performance, including extensive thermals. Article: https://www.gamersnexus.net/hwreviews...
    This review benchmarks the Intel i9-9980XE vs. AMD Threadripper 2990WX, Intel i9-7980XE, 9900K, and more. Testing includes a focus on overclocking and thermals, with additional testing for power consumption, Premiere rendering, Handbrake transcoding, Photoshop, gaming tests, and more.


    Intel i9- 9980XE Review - ANOTHER Skylake Refresh?
    HardwareCanucks
    Published on Nov 13, 2018
    The Intel i9-9980XE is an expensive processor that's supposed to perform well in benchmarks against the AMD Threadripper 2 2950X. But at $2000 its VERY hard to recommend.
     
    Vasudev, Dr. AMK and jaug1337 like this.
  8. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox Undefiled BGA-Hating Elitist

    Reputations:
    24,281
    Messages:
    32,874
    Likes Received:
    47,496
    Trophy Points:
    931
    Intel Announces Cascade Lake Advanced Performance and Xeon E-2100
    Cascade Lake advanced performance represents a new class of Intel Xeon Scalable processors designed for the most demanding high-performance computing (HPC), artificial intelligence (AI) and infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) workloads. The processor incorporates a performance optimized multi-chip package to deliver up to 48 cores per CPU and 12 DDR4 memory channels per socket. Intel shared initial details of the processor in advance of the Supercomputing 2018 conference to provide further insight to the company's extended innovations in workload types.

    Cascade Lake advanced performance processors are expected to continue Intel's focus on offering workload-optimized performance leadership by delivering both core CPU performance gains1 and leadership in memory bandwidth constrained workloads. Performance estimations include:
    • Linpack up to 1.21x versus Intel Xeon Scalable 8180 processor and 3.4x versus AMD EPYC 7601
    • Stream Triad up to 1.83x versus Intel Scalable 8180 processor and 1.3x versus AMD EPYC 7601

    Intel Shares More 48-Core Cascade Lake-AP Xeon Performance Data Vs AMD EPYC
    Processor core counts are skyrocketing these days, both on the consumer side and of course in the workstation sector. In regards to the latter, Intel last week announced the immediate availability of its Xeon E-2100 processors targeted at small and medium size businesses, and also a 48-core Cascade Lake CPU for burlier workloads. According to Intel's own testing, the 48-core chip trounces AMD's Epyc 7601 processor.

    Let's back up a moment. Intel is gearing up to launch a line of Cascade Lake-SP Xeon processors built on a 14-nanometer plus-plus (14nm++) manufacturing process, set to debut before the end of the year. Intel also announced that it will plans to launch even higher performing Cascade Lake-AP processors during the first half of 2019, and they will be powerhouses compared to the current Xeon Scalable family, as well as AMD's Epyc 7601.

    That's where the 48-core chip comes into play. It beats AMD's 32-core/64-thread Epyc 7601 in core and thread counts, while we'll have to wait and see how it stacks up in terms of clockspeeds and overall cache. In the meantime, Intel claims its upcoming slice of silicon tops AMD's monstrous part with a 3.4x uplift in LInpack and a 1.3x uplift in Steam Triad. And compared to the Xeon Scalable 8180, the performance delta is 1.21x and 1.83x, respectively.

    Intel is now providing some more performance metrics based on a set of real-world applications, rather than synthetic tests. As shown in the slide above, Intel's performance claim compared the Epyc 7601 amounts to the following:
    • MILC: Up to 1.5x
    • WRF: Up to 1.6x
    • OpenFOAM: Up to 1.6x
    • NAMD (APOA1): Up to 2.1x
    • YASK (ISO3DFD): Up to 3.1x
    It's fair to say that the average user is not familiar with any of those applications. In short, they represent a variety of high-performance computing (HPC) modeling and simulation tasks, from quantum chromodynamics to weather and atmosphere research and prediction. Heavy duty stuff, in other words, and of interest to the scientific community.

    Of course, with Intel's 48-core Cascade Lake-AP having more cores and threads than AMD's Epyc 7601, we would naturally expect better performance in applications that can take full or at least partial advantage of the additional processing resources. So, this isn't as much about the architecture as Intel may want to portray, as it is about core and thread counts. It's also worth noting the fine print, and specifically that SMT is on with two threads per core in YASK and NAMD, and one thread per core in some others, while still other tests have SMT disabled, which in some cases could be a function of the test itself.

    Nevertheless, these are impressive performance claims, if they hold true. The performance advantage could also be short lived—AMD recently showed off a 64-core/128-thread Epyc "Rome" processor based on its 7nm Zen 2 architecture.
     
    Vasudev and Dr. AMK like this.
  9. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Prophet

    Reputations:
    3,736
    Messages:
    6,954
    Likes Received:
    2,354
    Trophy Points:
    331
    It's all-around bad when even a notorious Intel boot licker is throwing shade your way.

     
    ajc9988 and Dr. AMK like this.
  10. ajc9988

    ajc9988 Death by a thousand paper cuts

    Reputations:
    1,233
    Messages:
    5,083
    Likes Received:
    7,117
    Trophy Points:
    681
    Have you not seen the Zen2 Epyc coverage? Or that the 64 core is likely in the same power envelope as the 32 core (so 180W-250W), whereas expected power envelope of the AP professor is minimum of 350W estimated from what I've seen, as well as them turning off SMT on the AMD servers, although Intel argues it is proper to do for linpack to give a higher score and they have effectively done so in other ways through affinity settings in prior test beds.

    I'm actually less impressed with this chip overall, especially since a prototype 64 core chip can own a server with 2x28 core chips, which is more than a single 48-core chip.

    Then factor in the improved floating point performance, which improves AVX instructions, the changes to IF2 and the I/O chip getting rid of NUMA on socket while this adds NUMA on Intel's side, plus questions of how they are using the UPI interconnect, I'm REALLY unimpressed with Intel's offerings, including the 9th series HEDT that dropped this morning.

    Sent from my SM-G900P using Tapatalk
     
    hmscott likes this.
Loading...

Share This Page