Input lag and Gsync on laptops

Discussion in 'Gaming (Software and Graphics Cards)' started by D2 Ultima, Apr 16, 2017.

  1. D2 Ultima

    D2 Ultima Livestreaming Master

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    If we do it, we need to not say we're laptop users. We'll instantly get attacked for it and people will write off anything we say.

    If anything, we should bring up the fact that vsync is automatically globally on for single GPU, Gsync laptops (it isn't for me, but I am non-gsync, SLI) after the initial statement.

    Either way, I'm down for joining it all.
     
  2. crusher88

    crusher88 Notebook Consultant

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    well from what you guys are saying, i should limit my fps to 60 for g sync to work properly but not alll games got that option in their settings,. and if active V sync that will just make the perfomance worse.. i'm unsure about what to do now... confused :/
     
  3. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Prophet

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    No, you need to limit your frame rate to something less than 60 in order for G-Sync to work. For games that don't give you this option, you can use the program RivaTuner Statistics Server.
     
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  4. D2 Ultima

    D2 Ultima Livestreaming Master

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    Yeah, from what I've discovered using NVPI and in-game limiters, the driver limiting function picks the best frame to limit to. 62fps for 59/60/61/62fps, etc. 125fps for 119/120/121/122/123/124fps. It seems that certain FPS limits don't work very well and are very stuttery.

    For example I limited Overwatch to 120fps. It looked horrible. Sometimes there were massive lagspikes.
    Then I tried 119fps. Same thing. 118fps also same thing.

    116fps was fine. 125fps, 126fps were fine. No stutter present.

    So it seems you have to fiddle a little to find a non-stuttery framerate limiting. I think the driver limiting in NVPI is a good dry run scenario. Try driver-limiting near the fps you want, then pick an FPS limit at where the driver limiter defaults to. Since 119 through 124 limits to ~125fps, 125fps is a good limit. 132fps is also a good limit. 56fps is a good limit. 70fps is a good limit.

    Fiddle and see what's best, then use it for gsync (or for driver limiting in general).
     
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  5. bennyg

    bennyg Notebook Deity

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    So people have been paying for gsync hardware all this time and it's not even working as intended?

    Criminal.
     
  6. crusher88

    crusher88 Notebook Consultant

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    i loved this thing i discovered.. now screen tearing is actually gone!
     
  7. HTWingNut

    HTWingNut Blah

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    Working as intended, just not properly utilized. And it comes down to response time and if you notice it or not in the games you play.

    I still put the onus on Nvidia though for not making it clear how users should best utilize it or offer a "one button optimization" method for those that don't want to fuss with the details.
     
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  8. alexwise

    alexwise Newbie

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    I don't know about you guys, but my Gsync does not work without Vsync being engaged in Nvidia Control Panel. I've capped FPS even as low as 50 and still saw tearing in the bottom part of the screen.

    Maybe laptop Gsync work differently from the desktop one.
     
  9. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Prophet

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    A desktop G-Sync monitor has a hardware module connected to the DisplayPort that communicates with the GPU in order to get it working. AFAIK, laptop screens contain no such hardware and thus the adaptive refresh needs to be implemented differently.
     
  10. alexwise

    alexwise Newbie

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    Yes, I'm aware of the module. Laptop are connected directly to the motherboard therefore implementation of the tech is different.

    However, it is puzzling why wouldn't Nvidia make turning Gsync on consistent between laptops and desktops.
     
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