IC Graphite Thermal Pad Available for Test and Review

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Innovation cooling, Apr 9, 2018.

  1. rinneh

    rinneh Notebook Prophet

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    I will try to do a test if I do get my hands on it. Currently in Asia, and the higher ambient temps make my unit more hot also. 4c core temps difference between the first 3 cores and the last core during gaming and I want to bring the 3 hotter cores to the same temp as the cooler core. I was hoping these pads would act a bit like a shim and thus create more pressure. But havent seen one for a decent price yet in Europe.
     
  2. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    I hear ya. I had to go through intense work to bring my non AVX prime95 temps to 1C between all cores. The results are definitely worth it, but I had to fight the battle of the bulge, vs convex heatsinks and imbalance and sandpaper to accomplish anything.

    There is always something very satisfying about taming your temps. Just like having a car you custom built and modified. Like..."your baby."
     
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  3. rinneh

    rinneh Notebook Prophet

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    Satisfying indeed but imo also a necessity. Even though intel states up to 100c is safe with the current generation of CPU's Im not buying that. I never want to go over 85c. Which my laptop now does in Asia, 88c to be precise.

    I did lap heatsinks in the past on my desktop but have zero experience with that on laptops. How did you work around raised edges on the heatsinks which come on contact with the VRM's etc? Also hwo to make sure the heatsink is not bulging outwards or convex?

    I truly hope these pads would give me more heatsink pressure. I hae a very strange temperature pattern.

    For example core 1 - 84c, core 2 - 85c, core 3 - 83c and core 4 - 81c.

    Not the usual core 0 and 2 that are way hotter than the rest.

    It doesn thelp I am such a perfectionist. Even though deep in my mind i know a laptop doesnt last as long as a desktop. I want to make it like it can last forever.
     
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  4. jujitsu1

    jujitsu1 Newbie

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    I would definitely like to try this. I have an Alienware 17R4 with thermal issues. I was going to try liquid metal but with the issue of it possibly leaking out this seems safer. Yes i know it is still electrically conductive but seems a bit safer than liquid.
     
  5. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    Read my foam dam guide for helping the LM leaking out issue here.
    Also, Mr Fox had success with this while another user did not (although that other user was using an existing shim), but it MAY be possible to use these IC pads as thermal shims, by putting LM on the CPU as normal, rubbing LM (read my guide) vigorously over the copper heatsink surface above the CPU contact area, then putting this pad between the CPU and heatsink, to increase heatsink pressure. This needs to be tested. I would test it myself but my back won't allow it right now. If I get well enough, I may remove my r9 290x and try it there.
     
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  6. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    Tested the "shim" between LM on the r9 290x. temps worse by 2C. Not a horrible result, considering the absolutely atrocious pressure with the X-bracket and the reference heatsink (the pressure is so atrocious it literally oxidizes all of the LM, but still cools okay if you apply enough to NOT have it all absorbed off the CPU).

    The shim method might work on high pressure heatsinks if used between CPU (IHS or bare die if you're brave)->LM pad->IC->LM spread on HS->mount.
     
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  7. amirbahalegharn

    amirbahalegharn Notebook Enthusiast

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  8. doofus99

    doofus99 Notebook Evangelist

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    Having read 41 pages of this thread it appears the Panasonic PGS soft pads, those with the "ZL" in the code, EYGS product code WITH "ZL", like for example EYG-S0612ZLWF, are just as good or better as the best thermal pastes, approaching LM, and with none of the issues of leaking all over the place? And as cheap as chips?

    Am I reading this right?

    I have an AW17 R5 arriving soon (it is taking unbelievable time to arrive since ordering) and would be very much interested in your views!
     
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  9. doofus99

    doofus99 Notebook Evangelist

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  10. doofus99

    doofus99 Notebook Evangelist

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    I wonder can the material, being spongy in nature, be stacked? I was thinking with the imprecise machining used for the Dell Alienware heatsinks and Clevos that require extra pressure to overcome the stiffness of the heatsink/heatpipes assembly and allow for better contact (paper clip methods etc), I was wondering would the spongy material make much better contact and fill uneven gaps much better than liquid pastes and ignore gravity as a bonus?
     
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