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IBM Thinkpad T60 - T60p with 4GB RAM Issue... ?Answered?

Discussion in 'Lenovo' started by sambucar, Aug 1, 2007.

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  1. sambucar

    sambucar Newbie

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    Hello,

    This is my first post and I have been reading about a few of you who have recently purchased a T60 or T60p Series IBM/Lenovo Thinkpad and questioning the 4GB of RAM only registering as 3GB or 3070MB in VISTA Control Panel. There have been some answers here and there and all seem to be good and right to an extent however I received a bit of a different answer when I asked the rep that sold me my IBM Thinkpad T60p. Here is what I was told (word for word):

    "The T7600 CPU can support 64-bit OS. The main reason we are selling 32-bit OS is due to the limited driver support of 64-bit OS version. It is true that a 32-bit OS cannot fully utilize 4GB memory. Most likely, it can utilize 3GB of the RAM. The advantage of having 4GB RAM is it allows dual channel mode operation, which will increase the speed of the RAM accessing speed. There is one thing that I am not 100% sure is whether T60p (hardware) supports 4GB ram or not (even if you have a 64-bit OS)"

    My actual experience to this point is that I received the IBM T60p a few days ago and installed the 4GB of RAM... I have Windows Vista Business 32-bit installed and sure enough, through Control Panel, mine reads 3070MB or 3GB RAM as well. Same as others of you have noticed.

    However, let's keep in mind that IBM does indeed sell this same exact Model (8743CTO) IBM Thinkpad T60p Workstation configured with 4GB of RAM so IBM/Lenovo themselves have some reason in this offering. This leads me to believe that there is a reason for the 4GB whether now or soon in the future.

    I am interested in further discussion on this topic as I was somewhat frustrated at first as well. I received my T60p (as configurations show below) with 2GB of Installed RAM which I then replaced with two 2GB sticks for a total of 4GB installed RAM.

    Thank you

    =========================================================
    My Systems:

    - IBM Thinkpad T60p - (Core 2 Duo T7600 2.33GHz, 4GB, 100GB - 7200RPM, 802.11N, DL-DVD Multi-Recorder, 15.4" Display)

    - IBM Thinkpad X31 - (Pentium Mobile LV 1.4GHz, 2GB, 120GB - 5400RPM, Cisco 802.11a/b/g, Dock with DL-DVD Multi-Recorder, 12" Display)
     
  2. eskimochaos

    eskimochaos Notebook Evangelist

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    You cant have 4gb or readable ram on a 32bit OS, end of story no ends ifs or butts. 32 bit OS's can only recognize 3gb and this will NEVER change.
     
  3. sambucar

    sambucar Newbie

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    Very good, Thank you for your input.
     
  4. paradoxer

    paradoxer Notebook Geek

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    Totally wrong.

    Dell sells XPS M1710/2010 with Vista 32-bit, and they can access 4GB RAM with PAE. But, since a lot of devices in the computer steal memory, you do not have 4GB RAM free.

    If you install 32-bit Linux on the Dell series, you will also be able to see 4GB RAM. And as the Vista 32-bit, you will not have all the RAM free, since the hardware steals RAM.

    On the IBM/Lenovo ThinkPad series, you will NOT be able to see more than 3GB RAM. Even if you install 64-bit OS, you will still see only 3GB RAM. That is because of a limitation in the BIOS or the embedded controller on the ThinkPad series.

    Both IBM/Dell/HP use the same chipset, and the chipset itself (945PM) has a limitation of 4GB.

    HP seems to have solved this matter in another way. In a 64-bit OS, you will only be able to see all of the RAM available, and not all the RAM accesssible by the hardware. HP reports around 3.3 - 3-5 GB RAM.

    Search my previous posts if you are interested in more details.
     
  5. paradoxer

    paradoxer Notebook Geek

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  6. tennismaster

    tennismaster Notebook Consultant

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    Thinkpads are certified to run linux...don't forget that linux could use 4 gigs.
     
  7. unhooked

    unhooked Notebook Deity

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    How is he wrong?
    With 32-bit Windows, installing 4GB of memory is a complete waste.
    End of story.
    Doesn't matter how you slice and dice it. :cool:

    Win Srv 2003, Linux...
    Why do you bother bringing those up???
     
  8. unhooked

    unhooked Notebook Deity

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    Just buy 3Gigs of memory (2GB + 1GB) and be done with it.
    In regards of dual channel. It's a common myth that it provides any significant or noticable advantages.
    BTW, with 3GB installed, your sticks will be running in asynchronous dual-channel.
     
  9. paradoxer

    paradoxer Notebook Geek

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    Dude, read what he wrote AND what I quoted. Return later.

    Your asynchronous dual-channel is = single channel performance. Read my previous post and you will find out how much it differs in performance.

    ... AND there are people using other operating systems than only your 32-bit XP.

    People actually read the posts here to learn things, not to listen to assumptions.
     
  10. unhooked

    unhooked Notebook Deity

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    Dude, people are asking a pretty simple question.
    Yet you're trying to complicate things, totally unnecessarily.

    Dual channel advantages are so slim, they're only detectable in benchmarks.

    Besides, what performance are you talking about?
     

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