i7-9850H vs i9-9980HK for 4k video editing

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by jack574, Dec 13, 2019.

  1. win32asmguy

    win32asmguy Moderator Moderator

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  2. jack574

    jack574 Notebook Consultant

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    "Why does the image in this post seem to indicate little to no GPU usage?"

    It was rebuilding an assembly behind the scenes, so nothing on the screen was changing.

    Still can't decide if the RTX 4000 is worth the extra £340 over the RTX 3000 or not...
     
  3. jack574

    jack574 Notebook Consultant

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    Hhhmmm. They tell me that all of the RTX cards do well. The RTX 3000 obviously wasn't tested.

    Doesn't help me decide whether the 4000 is worth £340 more than the 3000.....
     
  4. win32asmguy

    win32asmguy Moderator Moderator

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    Alright, I understand the bencharks @tilleroftheearth linked now. Those are done for a new feature which allows Solidworks to utilize the GPU for tasks. So in that case, you could definitely get benefit out of the more powerful GPU. It is about 33% faster than the RTX 3000 IIRC, not to mention having higher vram which may be necessary if it being utilized to render your projects. Oh, and note that this new "Enhanced Graphics Performance" mode is a beta feature in Solidworks 2019, and only considered stable in 2020.
     
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  5. jack574

    jack574 Notebook Consultant

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    Hhhmm, ok - thanks for that clarification, that's useful.

    Hard to know where to draw the line. The 3000 will be hugely more powerful than my current K4000M, but obviously the 4000 will be an improvement over the 3000.

    Then, the 5000 will be an improvement over the 4000...

    Have to draw the line somewhere!

    I don't plan to be replacing this laptop for a good few years (my current M6700 is 7 years old and still going strong apart from its startup issues), so perhaps it's worth stretching to the 4000. The 4000 is £340 more than the 3000, but to jump from the 4000 to the 5000 is another £811...

    Risk is I pay the extra for the 4000 but never even hit the limits of the 3000... Better that than the other way around I guess...

    Thanks
     
  6. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    @jack574, I have no doubt you'll hit the limits within ownership no matter what options you configure. :)

    The question is will you be using SW 2020 and later? If so, the RTX 5000, with double the RAM and other goodies, is the 'value' buy. I haven't seen anyone using a computer use less of its capabilities over time. Unless they totally abandon tech and go live in the jungle somewhere (that, I've seen).

    Have a very clear idea about your budget. Consider planning to upgrade the RAM more slowly in two or more stages (but within the next year, max), and even the storage subsystem can be put on hold for a few months (you do still have your old system, after all).

    Buy the parts you can't (easily) upgrade and know that when the platform is maxed out in every way, it will provide you with the most performance you can reasonably buy today and for the next 7+ years.

    The way I see it? ~33% faster is like buying/using tech from 5 years down the road, today. ;)

    That is a nice way to have your platform keep up at least partially with the O/S, Program and filesize changes we can expect to see and to keep it relevant that much longer.
     
  7. jack574

    jack574 Notebook Consultant

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    Hhhmmm... The additional cost to go from the 4000 to the 5000 is 1/4 of the cost of an entire new PC, so the question is would that money be put to better use upgrading the whole PC a year or so earlier, than spending on a better GPU now?

    Think I'm leaning towards the 4000...
     
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  8. win32asmguy

    win32asmguy Moderator Moderator

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    I think the difference between the 4000 and 5000 is not as big as it is with the desktop cards. On the Precision 7740, both cards are limited to 115W TDP so the synthetic benchmarks all show performance very close together. So unless you have a use case for the extra VRAM, its probably not worth it in my opinion.
     
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  9. jack574

    jack574 Notebook Consultant

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    Good, thanks. That's very helpful.

    What about the extra £340 to go from the 3000 to the 4000? Is that money well spent do you think?

    Also, do you happen to know if the 4000 in the Precision 7740 is the "RTX 4000", "RTX 4000 Mobile" or the "RTX 5000 Max-Q" when I'm looking at benchmarks?

    Thanks again
     
  10. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    The RTX 4000 on any current mobile platform I know of is the 'mobile/Max Q' version. Note that the comparison was for the desktop cards.

    That is one reason I would be swayed to the RTX 5000, the mobile cards are power limited, but the hardware features (16GB vram, etc. ) will still be useful longer on a mobile platform.

    Don't just configure this on the web and hit buy... Talk to a sales person and get the best deal you can. ;)

    If it makes you feel better, does ~100 a year more seems more worth it? For the '5000.

    Can't help that your workloads/workflows need (or at least can benefit) from the extra firepower. :)

    I'm not saying to ignore a hard budget. But if you do have the means, spending on hardware is a cost that is usually easily recouped.
     
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