i7 9700KF temps on Manjaro Gnome.

Discussion in 'Linux Compatibility and Software' started by x-pac, Apr 8, 2020.

  1. x-pac

    x-pac Notebook Enthusiast

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    So, I've been running Manjaro Gnome on my Eurocom Sky X7C (i7 9700 KF, RTX 2080 @ 200 Watts, 16 GB DDR4, 1TB m.2) for almost a year now, and it seems to me like my CPU is running hot in Linux in general. Here's what the core temperatures are like with just a single tab of Firefox running. Games would usually push things up to mid 70s to mid 80s.
    [​IMG]
    On Window$, which I would rather not have on my computer at all, the CPU temps seem to remain more or less normal, hovering around 45-55 degrees with similar usage.

    Does anyone have any idea as to what is causing this temperature difference? The CPU has not been overclocked or anything, even though I do have the unlocked BIOS, and I am wondering if this is some kind of bad microcode problem with Intel?
     
  2. senso

    senso Notebook Deity

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    Lack of undervolt?
    Maybe its needing a repaste?
     
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  3. x-pac

    x-pac Notebook Enthusiast

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    Either of those would be hardware-specific, and OS-independent... wouldn't they? Besides, it's a new laptop (less than a year old) running a custom copper heatsink, delidded CPU and kryonaut on all surfaces. I doubt it's a pasting issue... mostly because under Window$ the temps seem to be normal.
     
  4. jclausius

    jclausius Notebook Virtuoso

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    Yes for the re-paste, but not necessarily for the undervolt. Are you undervolting? If so, how are you doing it - BIOS or in Windows using something like ThrottleStop?

     
  5. x-pac

    x-pac Notebook Enthusiast

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    Not currently undervolting... :-/
     
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  6. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    There you go. Undervolting is almost a necessity since default voltage values are universally too high, especially for laptops.
     
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  7. senso

    senso Notebook Deity

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    Unless you did your undervolt at the BIOS level, its not OS agnostic, also, since you didn't say if you used Windows yesterday, or last year, and given the "hate" it seems like you haven't used Win in a long time, and 1 year is more than enough for paste to degrade and for heatsink fins and fans to be dirty/dusty.

    Also, Manjaro might be applying the latest microcode update at boot, so even if you undervolted on BIOS it might be using latest microcodes that disable undervolting..
     
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  8. x-pac

    x-pac Notebook Enthusiast

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    Windows has been on the laptop for a while... Eurocom shipped it with dual-boot set up. I would occasionally boot into it just to check the temps.
     
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  9. jclausius

    jclausius Notebook Virtuoso

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    In regards to the temp differentials between OSs, it isn't really apples to apples in a comparison of temps between two systems (even on the same hardware). It will be dependent on what services are running between the two.

    On Windows take a look at Task Manager, and see what processes CPU / Memory use are active and the amount allocated. For Linux, run 'top' from a command line (or you may use something like "System Monitor" depending on your distro). Take a look at what is running there.

    It could just be Linux temps are higher because you have it configured to do more.

    Just a thought.

     
  10. x-pac

    x-pac Notebook Enthusiast

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    I did, in fact, take a look at the processes running under each OS. Neither showed anything abnormal... the weird bit is even when Linux is throwing 65 - 70 degrees on the CPU, the actual CPU usage is still around 9-12%.
     
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