i5-2520 vs. i7-2620

Discussion in 'What Notebook Should I Buy?' started by fuchstronaut, Apr 28, 2011.

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  1. fuchstronaut

    fuchstronaut Notebook Consultant

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    Hi there,

    I've ordered a Dell Latitude E6320 just yesterday but it's not too late to make a change.
    I configured it with 8GB RAM and the i7-2620, but now I'm a little concerned about the battery life.
    Do you guys think, that less RAM or an i5-2520 will safe me some battery life?
    After all it's the same dual-core, just 200MHz faster.

    I don't really need the RAM and the faster CPU but it wont cost me more, so I just configured it.
    What do you guys think? Should I change my order? How much extrabattery life will it bring?
    More than 10 minutes?
     
  2. Bag3l

    Bag3l Notebook Evangelist

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    The i7 is a Quad Core processor, so obviously it will be drawing more power to run because, to be frank, it's more powerful. But the thing is, these new Sandy Bridge models are extremely energy efficient in comparison to the old iCore models (2010), so you don't need to worry about battery life.

    You will be much happier with the faster processor in the long run. I'd say stick with it because you really won't miss those few extra minutes (because really, that's all it really comes down to.) "Battery Life" itself is relative to what your computing habits are. Moderation is key.
     
  3. fuchstronaut

    fuchstronaut Notebook Consultant

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    Actually the i7-2620 is a dualcore. It's just 200MHz faster clocked and got 1MB more Cache
     
  4. maheshpatel

    maheshpatel Notebook Consultant

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    i7 is slightly faster other then that everything is same go for i7
     
  5. Rykoshet

    Rykoshet Notebook Deity

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    I find it not to be worth the money (since I believe it's $100+) of an upgrade.

    The extra cache isn't bad, check which integrated graphics each use (ie, are they both HD3000).

    If you're going dual-core, I'd suggest 2520 or 2630 if you're going quad, but skip the 2620.
     
  6. Teff

    Teff Notebook Consultant

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    As has been said, that's a dual core chip, not a quad core.

    The battery life difference between the i7 and i5 are likely quite small - keep in mind that in normal operation your CPUs will run closer to 800-1000Mhz, and they only clock up to the top end when you're doing heavy duty tasks. Because the i7 has more cache, it probably pulls a little bit more power at the same clock speeds, but it is not going to be a significant portion of the power the machine uses. My bet is that the battery life difference would not be noticeable in the real world, but probably be measurable in the lab if you're applying the same loads to both machines (probably like 10-15 minutes difference max)

    The integrated video in them is exactly the same. The only major difference in integrated video in the mobile i3/5/7 line is that the clockspeed on it on the i3 and i5-2410M are a little bit lower. From the i5-2420M to the dual and quad core i7 models, they remain the same.

    IMO, the price/performance benefit of going with an i7 are minimal in the case of the dual core CPUs - you're not going to see significant real world difference in the vast majority of applications. There are occasionally programs that benefit from the additional cache of the i7, but the i5 does have hyperthreading, so it's not like you're missing out on the most important other feature.

    If you can remove it from the order, I can bet that you won't miss the loss of the i7. If you find you need more performance than the i5 offers, you really would need to go to a quad core system to satisfy your performance needs.
     
  7. fuchstronaut

    fuchstronaut Notebook Consultant

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    thanks for your answer, since theres no difference I'll simply stay with the i7 (theres no pricediference for me)
     
  8. Bronsky

    Bronsky Wait and Hope.

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    If SB CPU's are similar to the first gen, the I7 should use 10-15% more power under heavy load. For that, you get about 5% more power output from the CPU. The extra cache results in a bit less efficient power use. IMO, it's no big deal and you will probably not notice the difference in overall battery life (.5 hours in 8?). I, most certainly, would not return my unit for that reason and if you got the extra power and ram for free, just get more efficient at aggressive power settings.

    Bronsky:cool:
     
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