*HP HDX DRAGON Owners Lounge, Part 1*

Discussion in 'HP' started by J-Bytes, Sep 14, 2007.

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  1. Scott_T

    Scott_T Notebook Enthusiast

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    So hear me out on this. What I am thinking of doing is buying a 7200rpm drive, maybe 200gb...I can use that in the second drive bay of my dv9000 to get some data off of it. Then I could put it in bay 2 of the new dragon?

    What would be slick is if I could then copy that data to the primary Dragon drive. Then finally swap out that primary Dragon drive for the faster 7200 drive and do a system restore?

    Speaking of system restore, I have never used the HP partition on my DV9000. Can I restore my system from that D(hp system) drive? Or do I need to make DVD's?

    I am surprised that there is not a 12 cell for the Dragon. You's think the aftermarket battery guys would be all over that for a monster like the Dragon..

    Regards,

    Scott
     
  2. Phinfan

    Phinfan Notebook Geek

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    I run my webcam with Cyberlink Youcam.
     
  3. Phinfan

    Phinfan Notebook Geek

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    This computer is very efficient. The one battery will last me through a movie. I have 2 batteries and watched movies all the way from Las Vegas to Chicago.
     
  4. Scott_T

    Scott_T Notebook Enthusiast

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    My dv9000 has the built in cam. The app I have never used that came pre installed is cyberlink youcam...Not sure if that helps. When I fire up the app, the cam comes on.

    Scott
     
  5. CyberVisions

    CyberVisions Martian Notebook Overlord

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  6. Scott_T

    Scott_T Notebook Enthusiast

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    The ram I will certainly order from new egg....

    The display is the one thing that just seemed a bit too pricey. I could not really justify it, having never seen it.

    Could you please list the specs on your ram and HD. I want to be sure I do not order the wrong stuff.

    BTW, I run PSCS3 and not any other Adobe apps. Occasionally Illustrator, but that is rare.

    Also why the upgrade to the wireless? Is there an advantage there? I thoiught they were all fairly similar...

    I will also look into the ultimate vista, although I thought the only thing ultimate offered was domain type network and some minor bells and whistles. Nothing really different in the core OS....

    Thanks for the reply,
    Scott
     
  7. CyberVisions

    CyberVisions Martian Notebook Overlord

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    I have the HDX with Ultimate 64, and 4gb DDR2. With the X9000 processor, the HDX screams - I actually can't believe how slow my desktop is compared to it.

    Having said that, keep in mind that few companies out there have jumped on the 64bit train, and that includes Adobe. Even though I'm using the CS3 Master also, so far I haven't had any problems, and I typically use PS, Illustrator, FW, Flash, Acrobat Pro 9, DW, ID, and some of the peripheral programs that come with it. The only thing I haven't used yet is Premier and After Effects. And I usually run several programs open at the same time when I'm working on site design/development without any problems. In fact, Ultimate is so good at utilizing the system and video RAM you don't even notice a drop in performance with several Adobe programs open, and you know what memory hogs they are.

    Adobe's official position, regardless, is that none of their programs are compatible with 64 bit technology, even though it happens to work with it. I expect they're just covering their butts. You can go to Start64.com to see what's available for 64bit systems.

    The only problem I've had to date is with the BD-ROM, but if you go back to page 193 (post 1927) you can read about the problems and solutions. After that I haven't had any issues.
     
  8. wolfskinbjc

    wolfskinbjc Notebook Geek

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  9. JohnnyFlash

    JohnnyFlash Notebook Virtuoso

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  10. CyberVisions

    CyberVisions Martian Notebook Overlord

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    My RAM and HD specs are in my signature - 2x320gb SATA's, 4gb DDR2 RAM. The RAM was 50% off when I got mine, even though I would've gotten it anyway if it wasn't. I also use an external 300gb Maxtor, and I plan to get another 500gb or 1TB drive this week. The SATA speeds are a bit slower, but I don't notice it, and you can't hear them when they're accessing. Keep in mind also that with 2 drives, HP makes a 14gb partition on one for the Recovery drive.

    Ultimate - aside from the additional capability of utilizing the maximum amount of RAM configuration, Ultimate's biggest draw (for me and others like me) is it's stability. I've yet to have any real problem with it, other than the compatibility issues with 32bit programs, but I already knew that before I got it. There's also a lot more that Ultimate has on the "extras" side than the others. I've typically run one or more utility programs (System Suite is my favorite, along with Diskeeper and Memory Boost) to make up for the lack of tools that XP and older Windows platforms have. I planned to add the same to my Ultimate setup, but I've found that most of what I got those other programs for is already incorporated into Vista, the one exception being Diskeeper. DK allows you to defrag things that Windows can't, simply because Windows can't be booted in order for those defrag operations to be performed. There's a couple of things that Memory Boost has that Ultimate doesn't, but it's not enough to have to install it again in my current system. In fact, I did install it, but took it out once I realized it wasn't really needed.

    Wireless Adapters - The letters in the wireless model indicate the wireless standard that they access - Wireless A,B,G, or N. Since my business relies on network access speed to the 'net, I run a Dual Band N Router (Linksys). The N standard uses 2 frequencies - 2.4ghz and 5ghz, just like a wireless phone at home. Using Dual-Band enables the user to access both frequencies individually - standard N adapters can only access the 2.4ghz frequency. The advantage to having 2 freq. access is that you can stream, say, gaming or multimedia content on one frequency, while someone else is downloading on the other without interfering.

    Example - I use the 5ghz frequency for both my HDX and my PS3 online access. I have my wife and daughter's systems set to access the 2.4ghz frequency. Anyone out there who has ever tried to do any online gaming while their kid is downloading MP3's knows how it affects everything. By separating the resources in to 2 frequencies instead of one, each user can get the full speed benefit of N in addition to not having to worry about interference from others on the 'net at the same time.

    In order to get the benefit of using both frequencies, you need both a Dual-Band router and a Dual-Band Adapter as well, whether it's a gaming/media adapter or USB. So far I've yet to see anyone come out with an Express54 network adapter of any kind at all.

    The other advantage of Dual-Band N is with the new Media Adapters that are coming out, like Slingbox (the HDX comes with the demo) and Sony's Location Free Base. These devices allow you to stream media content from anywhere in your home to the 'net, and by extension to you anywhere you have a connection. Say you're traveling and want to watch all of the Generation Kill Episodes from HBO On Demand. With one of the media adapters, you can access your cable box and stream that content directly to your system.

    In the end, it all depends on your particular situation - as a Consultant, I provide website hosting, design and maintenance services, and for support I also have Cisco Webex for remote technical access if I need to hook into a client's system, so for me it's a no-brainer. If like me you access the 'net frequently and need the download speed, then N is worth it. If not, then don't worry about it.

    Also, regardless of whether or not I have an installed adapter, I usually get a separate adapter that's compatible with my router. Whether or not an adapter or router are the same wireless standard, different companies build their hardware different, and I like to keep things in the family hardware wise. I know there are plenty of people who swear that everything works together if it's the same standard, but I've been doing this for a "few" years, and experience has taught me otherwise.

    HD Display - As far as the 1080p display goes, as I said in my previous post, unless you've seen it and used it, it's tough to understand the difference. I have a 32" Aquos that I use for gaming as well as BD's and cable, so I know the difference in display quality that 1080p gives you. I also use a 21" Samsung monitor with my desktop, and even though it's not HD, it's pretty **** nice. But as you said, you have to be able to justify the expenditure. For me, I had the benefit of an HP Employee discount, so that took a pretty good chunk off of the total cost of the unit, so I could afford to max out the configuration.

    2 other unrelated thoughts - First, you'll figure out soon enough that there aren't many case options for a 20" notebook. I have the HP roller case that they offer with the HDX - it's not bad, but it could be better. Despite what others have posted, there is in fact ONE company that makes a traditional notebook case that will fit a 20" system. It's made by Dicota, and the model is the Multigiant. Believe it or not, the main US supplier is the Dell Online Store. I've had mine on order for about 2 months now, supposed to get it in a couple of weeks as it was delayed. I thought it was pretty lame of HP that they don't have an option for their 20" system that Dell does for theirs. Most reviews I've seen online for it are very positive, and it's about half what the roller case costs. However, once you start adding batteries, adapters, and other crap, it gets pretty heavy - the HDX is about 15lbs anyway, so I suspect the reason HP doesn't carry the MG is because they probably feel it was too heavy for a traditional case. Point is, get a case now, either the one that HP has or the one that Dell does. The advantage of the roller case is that you don't have to take your system out at airport security like you would a traditional case.

    Second thought - one other accessory I got with mine (I got the quickdock, Vista switch and System switch and BT mouse) is the Bluetooth mouse. The main reason I got the HDX is that I've been retired on disablity for almost 10 years, after having 3 spinal surgeries that have left me with pretty high levels of chronic pain. There are many days it's hard for me to get out of bed just to go down to my office in my basement, so I wind up literally working in bed. (those of you that think it would be great, think again - you don't ever want to be in my position - ever) What I've found is that I can use the BT mouse on the bezel space between the keyboard and the edge, next to the touchpad, and I'm able to cover the entire screen. Just something I thought I'd throw in for further knowledge.

    Hope all of this blabber helps. Let me know if there's anything else I can enlighten you on...
     
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