*HP HDX 9000 DRAGON Owners Lounge, Part 2*

Discussion in 'HP' started by 2.0, Sep 3, 2010.

  1. remdale

    remdale Notebook Evangelist

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    Thanks for the nice set!
     
  2. MobileArtist

    MobileArtist Notebook Deity

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    I hope that at least one of the apps will work for you.
     
  3. remdale

    remdale Notebook Evangelist

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    Yeah. Friendeye or Dimmer+Desktop Lighter work almost perfect. There are some Start menu and panel brightness glitches though.
     
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  4. remdale

    remdale Notebook Evangelist

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    New updates!
    I took apart XB3000. It's a docking station for the dragon and now wanna share some information with you.
    There's space for a 3.5" hard drive by design. But it cannot be connected without a caddy. It can be bought separately (hard to find though) or purchased with another configuration of the XB3000. I was interested in how it could be attached to the docking station because I couldn't find any SATA, IDE or PCI express bus going out of the dragon's docking port. After taking it apart, I realized what it is. The HDD's caddy is a module that hosts an IDE/SATA to USB converter. It then can be attached to the XB3000's USB bus. My guess was correct. XB3000 has a USB hub (SMSC USB2507-ADT microcontroller) which can host up to 7 devices. In case of the XB3000, it is linked to 2 external USB ports and the HDD caddy's port (looks like a battery connector). Not sure of an actual transfer speed of HDD through the USB 2.0 channel:eek:
    As the docking station hosts 2 speakers, you can also see TPA3005D2 that is a 6W per channel audio amplifier.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
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  5. remdale

    remdale Notebook Evangelist

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    Now time for a big update!
    I got the Dragon to work with Dual Core 1066 FSB CPU's. The solution is so simple. In short, just solder a wire and flash RAM, that's it!

    Flashing RAM for CAS6 latencies.
    If you are using DDR2 800, you should just disable all the other latencies and leave just CAS6.
    If you are using Thaiphoon, just read the RAM's flash, uncheck 5T and 4T, apply and flash for each RAM module.
    [​IMG]
    Please refer to the Flashing RAM section in this post for other methods
    http://forum.notebookreview.com/thr...rs-lounge-part-2.515212/page-228#post-7298927

    The RAM will start working at around 443MHz
    [​IMG]

    FSB1066 BCLK pin mod

    Now here's how I got it to work.
    The whole FSB stuff is up to the north bridge, CPU and the clock generator as they are connected with BCLK/FSL lanes. I analyzed their datasheets, made some conclusions and understood my mistake that I did last time.
    The CPU outputs BCLK signal (a combination of BCLK0, BCLK1 and BCLK2) to the north bridge (BCLK0, BCLK1 and BCLK2 inputs) and the clock generator (FSLA, FSLB, FSLC inputs) to report of which FSB the CPU has been inserted. My mistake was that I thought the north bridge was outputting BCLK, so disconnected the north bridge from this communication, thus the input for it was BCLK0=0, BCLK1=0, BCLK2=0 (i.e. 000). According to Intel's specs: if there's any input but 001, 010 or 011, the chipset will shutdown the PLL (the clock generator). That's what happens when you install a 1066 FSB CPU.
    Here's a list of BCLK combinations:
    000 - FSB1066 CPU
    001 - FSB533 CPU
    010 - FSB800 CPU
    011 - FSB667 CPU
    I decided to make the chipset think an FSB 800 CPU has been inserted. So it required a 010 input and I had to measure the voltage for the 1. When T9500 was inserted it output 1.05v. Then I had to find where to take it from. I found VCCP voltage that did its job well and the closest source for it was the D502 diode. First, I disconnected the north bridge's BCLK1 by moving the R520 resistor so that still having it connected to the north bridge on one end, and the other end was used to connect the diode to the resistor. See the picture.
    The resistor I'm using is a replacement for the one I lost during my previous experiments. There was no such a tiny resistor in the shop, so I bough the tiniest one they had. Due to its sizes, I moved it a bit further from other elements to not short anything on the board. So I soldered it to the test point located on the same wire.
    The wire is connected to the diode's pin that is closer to the battery connector.
    [​IMG]

    Even though the electrical change has taken place, you still can use FSB800 CPUs!

    I've tested both P7350 and the engineering sample of T9600 marked as X9000. Both work fine. I've done the test with the latest official BIOS and the modded one.
    Some screenshots in Russian:D
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Now QX9300 should start with just 2 cores active, but I have not tried that yet.
    The most difficult part (QX9300, FX3700M) is coming soon
     
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  6. MobileArtist

    MobileArtist Notebook Deity

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    remdale:

    I continue to be impressed by the breath of your technical skill, your resourcefullness, and your perseverance!
     
  7. remdale

    remdale Notebook Evangelist

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    I was really surprised as well.
    I've got more news on QX9300. I got it to work somehow by following the instructions from this Lenovo forum
    https://forum.thinkpads.com/viewtopic.php?f=29&t=110620&start=30
    Here's a simple picture that explains what your next step should be. It was posted on the same forum.
    [​IMG]

    Those pins are not needed for our everyday life and should not be connected, so there are 2 ways. You can either isolate the pins and drill the socket or remove them by soldering them away. I'm not going to sell QX9300 separately, so I went the second way.
    By the way, the heatsink fits almost perfect
    [​IMG]

    Then I checked if the CPU could start without the removed pins. So I inserted it in my Dell M6400 and it booted fine. So I gave it a try with the Dragon.
    [​IMG]

    I'm using my modified BIOS that includes updated microcodes. I called it M.40 and edited the ROM date to make the difference.
    I don't know why the CPU speed is 1900 MHz though. Maybe because the other 2 cores are not functioning or need to boot with a correct ACPI table for quads.
    I wish somebody could help me with editing it because I'm not skillful at that. Right now I'm comparing Dragon's and M6400's ACPI tables to understand how it works and do the work correctly.

    MobileArtist, are you going to do all the work on your own or with somebody else?
     
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  8. MobileArtist

    MobileArtist Notebook Deity

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    If you get the 3700M working, I have a trusted tech person to do it. For a variety of reasons I bought the IBM/Lenovo variation, new, as it is a rarer card, and I assume that anything that is HP proprietary is in the Vbios, which can be flashed. If I'm wrong, then I'll get an HP version.
     
  9. remdale

    remdale Notebook Evangelist

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    What exactly is rarer there?

    Sorry I forgot to say that Win7 refused to start with QX9300. I need some time to sort that out.
    The Dragon is a unique machine because it has 3 power phases, i.e. it is capable of supplying 45W quads. Moreover, the user manual says that the Dragon is able to supply up to 55W CPUs.
    Power IC (ADP3207) that supplies CPU is the same with Dell M6400. According to the M6400's datasheet, it's max output current is 32.9A.
    If we do some calculation: 55W/32.9A=1.67V
    It means that we could increase the CPU's voltage up to around 1.67V!! But it's not possible physically.
    Anyway, if our Dragons had a good cooling system, it could handle good overclocking.
     
  10. MobileArtist

    MobileArtist Notebook Deity

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    The IBM variant is very hard to come by, and I was originally intrigued by some posters on the ThinkPad forum saying that it was easier to overclock than the HP version.

    Also, it apparently has (if memory serves) two more capacitors than the HP version.
     
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