HP 6930p owner's lounge

Discussion in 'HP Business Class Notebooks' started by przemke, Oct 16, 2011.

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  1. Indrek

    Indrek Notebook Virtuoso

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    Depends on your requirements, really. If you need CPU performance, a Sandy Bridge or Ivy Bridge i3 should outperform any mobile Core 2 Duo, though not necessarily by a significant amount (depending on the exact CPUs). If you need graphics performance, then the SB and IB integrated GPUs should also outperform even dedicated graphics in 14-15" laptops from the Core 2 Duo era. A new laptop is also more likely to have modern connectors like HDMI/DisplayPort for digital video (though the T500 does have DisplayPort), USB 3.0 (can be added to older laptops using ExpressCard) or SATA III (should only matter for high-end SSDs, though). If you don't need any of those, then the 6930p as well as the ThinkPads you mentioned will have much better build quality, better keyboards, productivity-oriented 16:10 screens (up to 1680x1050 for the T500), as well as other standard business-class features like docking stations, fingerprint readers, dual pointing devices (except for the X200), etc.
     
  2. amazing-boy

    amazing-boy Notebook Evangelist

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    Most important things to me are, in the order:

    1- keyboard quality
    2- display
    3- battery life
    4- low noise and cool system
    5- portability
    ...
    ...
    6- performance

    I really not too much interested into performance such that I think only with i5 I could notice a really improvement.
    I no need great graphic performance, the usage is strictly business oriented and I'm not a gamer.

    Among product in the choice there are, like said, Lenovo, Hp and eventually some Sony Vaio.
    I've had two Dell E4300 (Both rapidly reselled) and I don't consider this brand at the same level of Lenovo or Hp for what concern build quality.
    This evening I've found another model for the same price but it is a consumer notebook.
    I refer to the Hp DV 4310el
    Do You know it ?
    It is equipped with an i5 but I don't know if in terms of build and keyboard it is still at a good level.
     
  3. Indrek

    Indrek Notebook Virtuoso

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    I'll respond to these one-by-one.

    1. Choice of keyboard is very much an individual preference, but objectively speaking ThinkPads and HP's business-class laptops (later Compaqs and early EliteBooks) are widely regarded as having some of the best laptop keyboards. The 6930p should be almost identical to your current 6510b in terms of feel and layout, whereas a ThinkPad would probably need some getting used to (key travel is different, Fn/Ctrl keys are swapped, navigation keys are in a different location, and so forth). Of course, a modern consumer-class chiclet keyboard will be even more different, but then again one will eventually get used to anything.

    2. Not sure exactly which aspect of the display is important to you. Business-class laptops usually have mediocre-to-decent TN panels (with some notable exceptions), but cheap consumer-class laptops in the €300 price range will be no better, except that the ubiquitous glossy coating will improve colours and contrast under some lighting conditions. Resolution-wise, you're looking at a choice of 16:10 (1280x800, 1440x900 and 1680x1050) vs. 16:9 (almost invariably 1366x768 in this price range). For business/productivity use, I'd definitely recomment the former (and thus business-class laptops, though note that newer ThinkPads, EliteBooks and Latitudes have also switched to 16:9).

    3. The battery life on low-end laptops is usually nothing to write home about. For older business-class machines, it all depends on whether the battery you get with the laptop is used, and if so, how much wear it has. Depending on how much battery life you need, you might end up having to buy a new battery pretty soon. On the flipside, you have the option of using additional travel batteries, which offer extra battery life, though at the expense of weight and portability. For reference, my 6930p with P8800, Intel graphics, 8 GB of RAM and SSD+HDD combo gets about 3.5-4 hours of battery life under light-to-moderate use, and that's with 17% battery wear. With a fresh battery it should get 5 hours, and a travel battery could probably extend that to 10 hours.

    4. Noise shouldn't be much of an issue, especially if you're going for integrated graphics. ThinkPads do have the advantage of having air intake vents on the back, rather than the bottom, which means they can be used on soft surfaces (like in the lap or on a bed) without blocking the air intake, but that's a fairly minor thing for most people. You can read reviews here on notebookreview.com or on notebookcheck.net for typical operating temperatures.

    5. The X200 is obviously the smallest and easiest to carry around, of the ones you mentioned. Can't really draw any comparisons to typical consumer-class laptops without knowing any specific models you're considering (even the HP you mentioned seems to be available in 13" and 17" varieties). Ultrabooks and netbooks aside, though, I'd expect a consumer-class laptop to have roughly comparable dimensions and weight as a business-class laptop of the same screen size. You can always check the specifications for the models you're considering, and compare dimensions and weight.


    Anyway, if you haven't already, you should probably start a topic about this in the What Notebook Should I Buy? subforum, because we're getting off-topic here. Or feel free to drop me a PM. For more information and opinions about the ThinkPads, you can also check the Lenovo subforum, where there should be an owners' thread for each of the models you were considering.
     
  4. amazing-boy

    amazing-boy Notebook Evangelist

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    Opening a topic in the proper section and... sending a pm.
    :)

    thks.
     
  5. jke

    jke Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hola,
    as a place for the following info because the original thread on the display latch mechanism is already closed: I've recently purchased a KK082AV (Intel-LED) version of the 6930p and opened it up to repair the display latch on mine. The initial idea of course was to get my hands on the WXGA LED screen, but there's something to the LED version that just doesn't do it for me. I guess my next machine will be a Dell (!) E6430s. Oh well. Anyways, here's the difference I spotted between the KK082AV and my CCFL-typed 6930p ex 2009:

    [​IMG]
    hp-6930p-display-lock by kikuyumoja, on Flickr

    It's just the socket for the spring mechanism that's different. The rest is about the same. So if the lock on your 6930p is still faulty, fixing the springs may help. Oh, and there's also more (mechanical) tension on the CCFL version than on the LED version of the screen. I've exchanged these parts between both machines and now my 6930p is eventually fixed! Three years after the purchase.... :rolleyes:

    (yes, this included swapping the base plate :)
     
  6. Indrek

    Indrek Notebook Virtuoso

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    With regards to the ExpressCard problem I described earlier in this thread, it turned out to be a motherboard problem, as suspected. I returned the motherboard and got a refund (the seller was out of stock so couldn't send a replacement), and decided to just get an Intel 6930p. Got one in pretty nice condition off eBay.de for €260 with warranty until March 2013 and simply installed the upgrades I had done to my original - P8800, 8 GB RAM, SSD+HDD and USB 3.0 ExpressCard (which is working fine now). Will assemble the rest into a working laptop and sell it, to hopefully recuperate most of the cost.
     
  7. mrudenko

    mrudenko Notebook Enthusiast

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    Just picked up one of these nice 6930p for my dad. The machine I received looks mint and almost un-used so very happy.

    Two issues:

    1) after doing a win7 install I can't seam to figure out what driver I need for an "Other Devices" item in device manager:

    Base System device location PCI bus 133, device 9, function 2

    If somebody could point me in the right direction/right driver it would be greatly appreciated

    2) as mentioned the machine looks brand new, however today, on day 2 with the unit I am noticing that the machine is making a very low decibel hissing noise emanating from the motherboard what seems to be just below (toward the front of the machine) of the cooling fan on the left side, CPU? . It does not appear to be the hard drive. It almost plays a tune to the CPU usage if that makes any sense? it cuts in and out as the machine processes jobs. The hissing noise seam like an electronic chip hissing. Has anybody encountered this with this or other HP machines? Bummer that the warranty expired in July 2012. As I have typed this the noise has now reduced in loudness to the point where i now need to put my ear to the machine to hear it, but before it was clearly audible sitting in front of the laptop. Almost seams like the machine needed to warm up like an engine to run smoothly. But the noise is still there:(

    Thank in advance

    Matthew


    OK figured this one out, it was the Ricoh card reader hp driver file sp45112.exe

    1) regarding this I don't know what it is as I haven't used win7 yet but I can suggest leaving this if all stuff you need works. Might be quicklaunch buttons for example - if you care check the device ID from "details tab" (or similar) in driver properties, one like below and you should look after that phrase
    Currently I have two unknown devices in winXP:
    ACPI\HPQ0004\3&B1BFB68&0
    ACPI\HPQ0006\2&DABA3FF&0
    2) it's most likely some coil or a transformer on the mainboard. This happens sometimes, saw it once or twice on the predecessors line of this laptop. it is told that if you locate the proper chip you can use some hot glue or silicone to silence it
    it must be one that is stressed when hard drive is working (unless it's something in the hard drive itself as that's about the location you describe)
     
  8. przemke

    przemke Notebook Geek

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    Turns out the case is not that tough, after about 3 drops (in a couple of months) from ~50cm table in the same manner to the left side the plastic corner crushed and aluminium surface there is bent. looks bad, maybe will try to glue it and bent back before looking for a new case ;]

    well bad spot, I've always considered myself a good crash-tester for any device :p
     

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  9. Indrek

    Indrek Notebook Virtuoso

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    Well, the purpose of the case is not to be rigid and indestructible, but to absorb the shock and protect the electronics inside. If your laptop is still working fine, then I'd say it did its job.
     
  10. przemke

    przemke Notebook Geek

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    Yes, in that way you are right, it did its job :)
    However makes it a bit more complicated as recently i've noticed a couple of bad pixels on center right side of the screen (1440x900). as laptop is still under warranty i don't know if the will replace screen when there's obvious physical damage to the case :(
     
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